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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | November 28, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The government and th African National Congress said yesterday they will resume constitutional negotiations next week as the first step toward getting full-scale talks going again among all of South Africa's political groups.The talks between delegations headed by ANC President Nelson Mandela and President F. W. de Klerk are scheduled for Wednesday through Friday, with a second round in the first week of January.The delegations plan to talk about most of the major unresolved issues, including ending violence and drafting a democratic constitution to replace apartheid.
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NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | October 11, 1992
DURBAN, South Africa -- In the turbulent world of South African politics, Mangosuthu Buthelezi is making his last stand, and he is summoning his tribe's ancient warrior tradition to the task.Chief Buthelezi, this country's most prominent Zulu leader, is relying on the ethnic pride of the nation's Zulus to wage a life-and-death struggle with the African National Congress, which has displaced the Zulu kingdom as the most formidable black force in South Africa.Inkatha is considered a conservative black organization, which promotes free enterprise, while the ANC has a large number of communists in its ranks.
NEWS
September 29, 1992
Dramatic events in South Africa provide new hope that a political center with power to achieve the dream of a democratic, multi-ethnic society is slowly, painfully taking form. Its core is -- and must remain -- an alliance between the white Nationalist government headed by F.W. de Klerk and the black African National Congress under the leadership of Nelson Mandela.When these men are at odds, as was the case from last June to this past weekend, all progress stops. When they dare to agree, as they did in putting constitutional talks back on track, they have power to confront the many forces that would keep South Africa divided and at war with itself.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
DURBAN, South Africa -- The South African reform process was dealt a blow yesterday by Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi, who said he would not talk with the government as long as it was making private deals with the dominant black African National Congress.Mr. Buthelezi, leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party, said he would not abide by any agreements struck between the government of President F. W. de Klerk and the ANC led by Nelson Mandela."Either we will have bilateral negotiations between the government and the ANC, which will lead to the victory of revolutionaries . . . or we will have multilateral negotiations leading to a fair, race-free democracy in which the ANC is one party among many," he said.
NEWS
July 29, 1992
Charges against South African security forces of suppressing dissent, brutalizing captives and taking sides in ethnic conflicts have taken on greater credibility in recent weeks. They cast doubt over the integrity of negotiations for a new South Africa taking place among political parties.The "smoking gun" of evidence against the police is the statement to the Sunday Times of South Africa by Dr. Jonathan Gluckman, a pathologist who examined 200 bodies of victims of police torture in recent years.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | July 28, 1992
NONGOMA, South Africa -- It was a day of glory revisited.The battlefields of past Zulu wars stretched far into the distance between the bronze-colored hills of Zululand, interrupted by an occasional huddle of grass-topped huts.From the direction of the royal residence, home of King Goodwill Zwelithini, came a regiment of stern-faced warriors dressed in animal skins and strips of beads.The warriors marched swiftly into an open field in a fierce display of militancy, brandishing spears, sticks and shields of leather and wood.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 7, 1992
ULUNDI, South Africa -- With reform talks in tatters and tensions rising, this country is now on the verge of civil war, according to Zulu Chief Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi.The black pro-government leader, whose Inkatha Freedom Party has been locked in violent conflict with Nelson Mandela's African National Congress, said yesterday that the decision of the ANC to withdraw from negotiations to end apartheid could lead only to more bloodshed."I think it is very dangerous," Mr. Buthelezi, 63, said in an interview in his office here in the capital of KwaZulu, the black homeland set aside by the government for his tribe, of which he is chief minister.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | July 5, 1992
BOIPATONG, South Africa -- As the sun goes down, the barricades go up in this dusty little township, revealing the battle zone that Boipatong has become.Tree trunks and stones are dragged to the entrance of virtually every dirt street, making it difficult for attackers to come by car or truck.The boys of the township, known locally as "comrades," become the watchmen for the community. They put down their schoolbooks and take up rocks as weapons for their all-night patrols."We don't have guns.
NEWS
June 23, 1992
For South Africa, the temporary breakdown of constitutional talks is ominous. The slaughter which provoked it is more so. Black-white negotiations in the Convention for a Democratic South Africa (Codesa) were fated to stop and stutter and start again. But if a halt cannot be brought to the violence between Zulu and Xhosa, between African National Congress and Inkatha Freedom Party, it is grim news. If supporters of the ANC believe that the government through the police is fomenting the attacks carried out by Zulu people, then the potential alliance between ANC and the current white government, on which South Africa's hope for internal peace rests, cannot materialize.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer The New York Times contributed to this article | June 20, 1992
BOIPATONG, South Africa -- A large contingent of white policemen stood by at the KwaMadala hostel yesterday, across the highway from this township of modest houses and little shacks where 39 people were massacred this week.The survivors of the massacre Wednesday night say that Zulu tribesmen from the hostel committed the massacre. Many residents suspect police of complicity in the attack and say that police vans were used to protect the attackers rather than the residents, who were murdered in their own homes by a gang of 200 men wielding knives, guns, axes and spears.
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