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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Special to the Sun | July 23, 2008
When Charlie Gailunas harvests zucchini from his lush Catonsville garden, he might overlook a specimen camouflaged beneath a canopy of leaves. "Sometimes you miss one," he says. By the time he finally discovers the hidden squash, it may have grown to baseball-bat proportions, far beyond the zucchini's capacity for tenderness and a pleasing, mild taste. Gailunas, a retired hospital administrator who has cultivated his 700-square-foot garden for 30 years, doesn't toss the zucchini, nor does he pawn it off. He makes Gagutz, a Sicilian soup introduced to him by a neighbor's mother who lived in Little Italy.
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FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | February 9, 1994
In this menu it's important to pay as much attention to technique as to the food items -- the latter can be interchanged at your pleasure. Salmon can be traded for other fish fillets, or even for boneless skinless chicken breasts, or some cuts of pork. Crookneck squash, tomato halves or even eggplant can replace the zucchini. If you want a spicier meal, use cayenne pepper instead of paprika or try other favorite herbs in lieu of the ones suggested here.This meal makes full use of one cooking source from entree to dessert.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 16, 2000
"Less is more" is a philosophy I heartily embrace when cooking today, but it was not always so. In the early days of my culinary career, I thought nothing of making recipes that included two pages of ingredients. No dish was too complicated to undertake, no technique too difficult to try. Oh, how times have changed. I still love good food, but I have much less time to devote to cooking today, so I am always on the lookout for simple dishes filled with robust taste. Nowhere is food simpler yet more intensely flavored than in Provence, and on a recent visit there, I realized again how uncomplicated yet delicious the dishes from this region of France are. The memories of such modest, unpretentious fare were in my mind when I was trying to decide what to take to a potluck supper last week.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and Elinor Klivans,Special to the Sun | September 21, 2005
It begins with a spring trickle -- a few peas, some spinach and those first tender green beans. Then it picks up speed like a raging river. Summer progresses, squash and cucumber vines become laden and tomato plants sag with the weight of their red globes. Then we move into the first fall days when it is time to snip broccoli and the last of the fresh herbs. Carrots, onions, leeks, garlic and parsnips are ready to be pulled from the ground. It is a veritable vegetable avalanche and happens just when one feels ready to turn on the oven again and take advantage of all of this bounty.
FEATURES
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | August 9, 1998
On the dinner plate or in the garden, zucchini is one of those things in life that's most appreciated when there's just enough of it, less so when there's an overabundance.Still, it's a good idea, given zucchini's prolific nature, to prepare to handle a bumper crop from the backyard garden or a neighbor's largess.Tips:* Fresh zucchini (green or yellow) should be firm, with no brown spots. Smaller squash (6 inches or less) are usually sweeter than larger, more mature ones. Store in a loosely closed plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to three days.
FEATURES
By Kyra Effren and Kyra Effren,Dallas Morning News Universal Press Syndicate | March 16, 1994
Passover begins at sundown March 26 with the traditional Seder dinner.And, as they have for generations, Jews will partake of the ceremonial dishes of Seder as they begin their celebration of the Jews' flight from Egypt to freedom.But these days, families celebrating Passover are creating Seder menus and dishes that update traditions to reflect today's more casual lifestyles.This trend shows up in the "holidays" section of the cookbook "From Generation To Generation" ($16.95), recently published by the Sisterhood of Temple Emmanu-El in Dallas.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY | July 5, 2006
When I tire of brats or other sausages on the grill, a whole chicken makes a great change. Usually a project for a weekend meal when I have more time, a chicken grilled indirectly and flavored with herbs or a marinade is delicious. But even as it's cooking, I'm thinking about the leftovers. Plenty of chicken will be left to be boned and used for another meal. This hash is born of such leftovers. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which supplied the recipe analysis. Menu Chicken-and-zucchini hash Leaf lettuce salad with avocado and olives Ice cream cones TIPS Don't have leftover chicken?
FEATURES
By Carol J. G. Ward and Carol J. G. Ward,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 9, 1998
Anyone who has ever sown a few basil seeds in a patio container can testify that the herb absolutely loves warm, humid weather.This fragrant, fragile herb is easy to grow and produces prolifically if you trim off the flowers. Right about now, pesto-weary gardeners are wondering how much basil one clay pot can produce.Like many of the culinary herbs, basil also is a strong herbal medicine. A member of the mint family, it can be used as a tonic and an antiseptic. Rub crushed, fresh basil leaves on skin to relieve insect bites.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | July 9, 2000
When summer heat and humidity diminish appetites, consider making a meal of light, refreshing "sides." The following duo of side dishes -- a Gruyere-topped zucchini and tomato gratin, a cooling tabbouleh with extra vegetables can be served soon after they're prepared or chilled and served the next day or so, when their flavors have melded. A boon for picnics and cookouts, these side dishes all travel well. Serve this classic summer medley warm or cold as a side dish for grilled foods, or with an assortment of other side dishes.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | January 2, 2002
James F. Glover of Owings Mills is seeking a zucchini casserole, a dish his late wife made. "It consisted of ground meat, zucchini, tomato, cheese and probably something else that I can't remember. It was baked in the oven." Natalie R. Zajac of Nottingham responded with a recipe that she said her mother made very often, especially during summer when fresh vegetables were available. The ingredients are available in most food markets year-round. Zucchini Casserole Makes 8 to 10 servings 1 1/2 pounds sliced zucchini (about 3 large)
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