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By Waltrina Stovall and Waltrina Stovall,Dallas Morning News | August 31, 1994
Have you ever tried to raise just enough zucchini for your family needs?You probably soon had more than enough to share with friends, neighbors and casual acquaintances.Zucchini (known in France and Great Britain as courgettes) is not native to the New World, but was brought over by Italians in the 1920s according to John Mariani's Dictionary of American Food & Drink.The book doesn't say how many seeds, or plants, were shipped over, but a handful was likely ample. The green vegetable is popular not only in the United States but also in Mexico, where it is called calabacitas.
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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | August 26, 1998
WHEN LAST WE left the fat zucchini, they were hanging in a pillowcase from the rafters of the back porch.The saga of the suspended zucchini began last week when I scooped out some wide-bodied zucchini, filled them with sugar, stuffed them in a pillowcase and waited for them to ferment. The idea, pulled from a cookbook, was to make a zucchini rum that would drip from the pillowcase and be collected in a bowl. That process has now been completed and has produced two notable results. First, it has brought forth a liquid.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | July 28, 1996
ZUCCHINI IS a vegetable of many metaphors.It is hard to refer to them in the singular. You rarely see a solo, declarative zucchini. The more common condition is Zucchini! Katie, bar the door!They arrive with the sudden fury of a summer thunderstorm. For a long time there is nothing. Then one afternoon you notice a gathering of dark forms, and before you know it they descend on you. Big green guys, most long and thin; some wide guys as well.Their initial appearance is the cause of some excitement.
FEATURES
By Patricia Jamieson and Patricia Jamieson,Eating Well Magazine United Feature Syndicate | July 14, 1993
At this time of year, zucchini is so plentiful you can hardly give it away.American cooks have come up with numerous, often ingenious, ways to deal with the overflow from the garden, but all too often, healthful vegetables are combined with high-fat ingredients.Beverly Parker of Austin, Texas, was concerned about the large quantity of vegetable oil in her zucchini muffin recipe. At first, we tried using a prune puree as a fat substitute, but the strong prune flavor overwhelmed the simple muffin.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 7, 2003
Soaring temperatures and high humidity have been unremitting features of much of this summer. As a result I have found myself planning lighter meals to counter the oppressive weather, especially when entertaining. Twice this past week, for example, I served icy-cold Zucchini Vichyssoise to begin meals. The first night I ladled the chilled mixture into bowls and offered it as a first course for a supper in honor of out-of-town visitors. The next evening, I took a big container of it to the home of good friends to have as an appetizer.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 25, 1999
I am always on the lookout for new starters, and last week I developed a new hors d'oeuvre in a serendipitous way. I decided to grill lamb chops and serve them with roasted zucchini slices topped with goat cheese and a sprinkling of parsley, mint and lemon zest. But when I pulled the zucchini from the oven, I realized that they were the perfect size to be served as appetizers. These nibbles can be prepared in advance and will only need to be heated at serving time. Zucchini Croutons With Goat Cheese, Parsley and MintServes 6 to 8 1 1/2 pounds medium zucchini (3 to 4 zucchini)
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
In The Classic Zucchini Cookbook, Andrea Chesman repeats the old saying that the true test of a friend is one willing to accept zucchini in September. Certainly zucchini is one of the most prolific summer vegetables, straining the appetites of even ardent fans. Grill it, bake it, fry it and boil it, you still end up with zucchini crowding the bottom drawer of the refrigerator. Chesman notes that three zucchini plants supplied enough vegetables for her to test recipes on her family nearly every day one summer.
FEATURES
By Gerald Etter and Gerald Etter,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 31, 1991
Zucchini and yellow squash are hitting markets in a delicious, summer-fresh avalanche. Both of these vegetables are in peak season and readily available at bargain prices.Most summers, area farmers plant so much of these squashes that when they come into full season, they flood the market. "This makes it very cheap," says Walter Zolotuchin of Stella Farms in Tansboro, N.J. "But it's still a wonderful food."For the record, zucchini is the long, green squash. Yellow squash -- called yellow zucchini by some -- comes in two varieties: straightneck, which is shaped like a small baseball bat, and crookneck, much like straightneck but with an arched shape.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 12, 2006
Most of my friends are social creatures (just like my spouse and I) and love to entertain. However, when it's so hot outside that cooking an entire meal seems more like hard labor than pleasure, my fellow cooks and I often opt for preparing a meal together. We choose a menu, then each pick a course to make. I love this idea, because it means that I can concentrate on a single dish. For such a meal, I recently suggested that we begin with a chilled soup, followed by a grilled, butterflied leg of lamb plus sides, and a fruit tart for dessert.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 17, 2005
Shirley Foy of Baltimore wrote that she had lost a favorite recipe that appeared a few years ago in Southern Living magazine for summer squash with tomatoes and onions. Kathleen Kosinski of North East sent in a recipe from Southern Living Annual Cookbook, 1987 that sounded like what Shirley was looking for. This is the time of year to make this dish, preferably with just-picked zucchini, tomatoes and basil from your garden. This recipe calls for dried basil, but when I tested it I decided to substitute with the fresh because I had it growing.
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