Advertisement
HomeCollectionsZoom
IN THE NEWS

Zoom

BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 2, 2000
Chapman Holdings Inc., a Baltimore brokerage and investment bank, said Tuesday that its fourth quarter and annual profits surged in 1999. For its fourth quarter, which ended Dec. 31, the company reported a net profit of $1.2 million on revenue of $4.3 million. By comparison, Chapman Holdings booked a net loss of $825,000 on $689,000 in revenue in the comparable three months in 1998. For the year, Chapman Holdings said it earned $364,000 on revenue of $8.5 million. Revenue increased 180 percent compared with 1998 when Chapman Holdings lost $1.1 million on revenue of $3 million.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2003
A rebounding stock market helped lift Legg Mason Inc.'s income by 47 percent, setting a record as the Baltimore brokerage and money management company raked in more from fees in its fiscal second quarter. Net income in the quarter that ended Sept. 30 was $66.6 million, up from $45.4 million in last year's quarter. The company also reported record diluted earnings per share, which rose 93 cents, up 41 percent, from 66 cents in the fiscal second quarter last year. The company's assets have soared this year, and it is among several brokerages that have reported double-digit percentage increases in quarterly earnings as the market has surged.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
The Ravens have sold nearly 90 percent of the season tickets available for their debut season, despite above-average prices and an unpopular licensing requirement.Wednesday was the deadline for first-day priority, and all applications received by then will be randomly sorted by a computer and assigned seats. Applications received after that will be processed on a first-come, first-served basis, according to the day they get to the team.The team began accepting ticket orders by mail last month and by phone this week, and also set up drop-off boxes on Wednesday for first-day priority.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2001
Yesterday was a mixed day on Wall Street for defense contractors. Some military suppliers posted big gains, and others were hit hard from investors. United Technologies Corp. was one of the big losers. Its stock fell more than 28 percent to close at $47.50. On the flip side, Raytheon Co., a maker of the Patriot missile and a variety of other products for the military, posted a gain of nearly 27 percent. "United Technologies got clobbered," said Nicholas P. Heymann, a defense analyst at Prudential Securities.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | November 28, 1999
IF CONGRESS wants evidence about how federal tax policy can transform consumer behavior, it need look no further than a forthcoming report on the current state of the American home equity loan.Whereas barely 30 years ago second mortgages were considered a backwater of consumer credit, aimed primarily at people who had no other way to raise cash, today they are a product for the creme de la creme: Home equity borrowers have higher incomes than the average American household, they pay much less for their credit than people who take out ordinary consumer loans, and they default on their obligations at a very low rate.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | January 26, 1992
Televising the Super Bowl remains very much a huge event, but, in some small way, downsizing has struck. It used to be that networks would crow about taking the Old MacDonald approach to cameras -- here a camera, there a camera, everywhere a camera, camera.Not this year.CBS will use 16 to cover today's game in Minneapolis, seven fewer than it had in Super Bowl XX."In the past, it had been good for executives to say, 'We had one more camera than last year,' " Bob Stenner, producer of the game telecast, said in a news conference last week.
NEWS
By Kirk Johnson and Kirk Johnson,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 2003
NEW YORK -- The New York City region has been likened to a quilt -- a stitched-together patchwork of neighborhoods and communities so different in their economic and ethnic profiles that location can sometimes seem like the only thing they have in common. Now, for the first time, scientists are beginning to look at the future climate in the same way. Their key insight is that just like everything else in and around New York -- from school quality to crime rates and taxes, global warming and the change in climate over the coming century -- will affect people and their health differently, depending on where they live.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | October 10, 1993
Here at the Straight Shots photography studio in Columbia, Judy Herrmann is fussing with a bunch of snappy, colored craft )) beads. She appears to have the patience of a surgeon.A dozen times she looks through the lens of the mounted 4-by-5 view camera, then pops back to a table board to fuss with the beads. She takes pains to group the beads in such a way that none will appear snipped in half in the photograph. "And I don't want any spaces between the beads!" she declares in frustration.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1995
A leopard crouches in the tall grass, locking its eyes on a man standing less than 20 feet away. As the animal gets ready to pounce, Roger Birkel grabs his camera and starts clicking away."
BUSINESS
By Lawrence Edelman and Lawrence Edelman,Boston Globe | May 27, 1991
The sexy personal computer industry is looking a lot less glamorous after a week in which some of the biggest names in the business took a trouncing.Consider: Loss-plagued Businessland Inc., once the largest franchiser of PC retail stores, said it may have to file for bankruptcy protection.Compaq Computer Corp.'s stock, for years a Wall Street favorite, plunged 27 percent after it warned that second-quarter earnings may be 80 percent below last year's level.Apple Computer Inc. was reported to be considering layoffs of up to 2,000 employees, or 12.8 percent of its work force, as part of a cost-cutting plan to offset falling profits.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.