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Zoning Variance

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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1997
Hampstead's Board of Zoning Appeals has denied developer Martin K. P. Hill's request for a zoning variance that would have permitted him to build larger, more expensive homes in his North Carroll Farms IV subdivision.Last month, Hill applied for a reduction in the town's rear and side yard setback requirements for 148 single-family homes. In some cases, the variance would have reduced the yard space between the new houses and the homes of adjacent property owners in the North Carroll Farms development.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young on Thursday requested several city agencies prepare reports about a zoning bill introduced to the council this week that would allow a former Catholic school to be turned into a convalescent home for homeless people. Project PLASE (People Lacking Ample Shelter and Employment), a 30-year-old nonprofit headquartered in Charles North, has offered $1.4 million for the former St. Joseph's Monastery school buildings in the 3500 block of Old Frederick Road in Southwest Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Baltimore City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young on Thursday requested several city agencies prepare reports about a zoning bill introduced to the council this week that would allow a former Catholic school to be turned into a convalescent home for homeless people. Project PLASE (People Lacking Ample Shelter and Employment), a 30-year-old nonprofit headquartered in Charles North, has offered $1.4 million for the former St. Joseph's Monastery school buildings in the 3500 block of Old Frederick Road in Southwest Baltimore.
EXPLORE
January 5, 2012
The Humane Society of Harford County had been an embattled organization for a number of years. The private, not-for-profit organization that manages the de facto county animal shelter has at times been at odds with factions of volunteers as well as with the county government. The organization's relationship with the county is critical and mutually beneficial as the county provides substantial funding for the shelter, but doesn't have to pay a lot more to maintain a full-fledged municipal pound.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2001
A county hearing officer has denied a zoning variance sought by a Crownsville developer to build a house wider than allowed on a plot of waterfront land in Severna Park's Manhattan Beach - a victory for residents fighting the 6-foot difference. Administrative hearing officer Stephen M. LeGendre ruled that the plot at 759 Dividing Road is capable of being developed within the code. Severn Associates, headed by Steve Washington, wanted to tear down an existing house and build another that is 26 feet wide - 6 feet wider than permitted - and contended that a smaller house would be unattractive and nonfunctional.
NEWS
By From staff reports | September 10, 1995
Having been rebuffed twice by the Baltimore County Board of Appeals in seeking a zoning variance, officials with the UMBC Research Park Corp. are taking their case to court.Construction of the research park was to have begun this fall, but in July the board overruled a zoning commissioner's decision to grant the variance.UMBC asked for reconsideration of the ruling, but last week the board reaffirmed its decision and said UMBC must go back to the beginning of the county's approval process.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | June 28, 1995
For nearly 50 years, Windy Valley Restaurant at Falls and West Joppa roads has cornered the local market on remedies to hot summer evenings with its made-on-the premises ice cream.But a real estate executive and his family want to offer a cooling alternative in a time-honored Baltimore entrepreneurial fashion -- a corner snowball stand.Donald R. Grempler, president of Coldwell Banker Grempler Realty Inc., said his wife, Marci, and their three children -- twin 10-year-old girls, and a boy nearly 12 -- would operate the snowball stand with others to be hired.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2000
The name of the proposed pet shop on York Road in Towson is Just Puppies. Beyond that, things get a little complicated. Residents, including representatives of private shelters, want to block the store, part of a family-operated chain that includes a Laurel outlet, because it plans to stock up to 60 puppies at a time. The opponents say the store cannot provide such a high volume of dogs without resorting to "puppy mills" -- large commercial breeders that produce dogs more prone to disease and temperament problems.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | July 21, 1991
The Marston farmers who late last year denied operating a slaughterhouse will this week appear in front of the County Board of Zoning Appeals for permission to operate a slaughterhouse.Carroll Lynn Schisler, 44, and his brother August "Fred" Schisler, 38, are expected torequest a zoning variance Thursday afternoon to operate a commercialslaughterhouse on their 112-acre farm on Marston Road.County zoning laws allow farmers to operate slaughterhouses for their own use but require zoning approval for commercial slaughterhouses.
EXPLORE
October 11, 2011
In denying a request for a zoning variance to the owners of Legends Vineyard, of Asbury Road in Churchville, the Harford County Council has shown a willingness to preserve land not zoned for retail use from encroachment. Such encroachment has long been a problem in Harford County, and much of suburban America. It's easy to look at a particular case like Legends Vineyard and conclude the owners are subjected to a hardship by Big Bad Government Regulation. But in this case, the hardship was known before the business was established.
EXPLORE
October 11, 2011
In denying a request for a zoning variance to the owners of Legends Vineyard, of Asbury Road in Churchville, the Harford County Council has shown a willingness to preserve land not zoned for retail use from encroachment. Such encroachment has long been a problem in Harford County, and much of suburban America. It's easy to look at a particular case like Legends Vineyard and conclude the owners are subjected to a hardship by Big Bad Government Regulation. But in this case, the hardship was known before the business was established.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
The Friendly Inn on Frederick Road in Ellicott City can have an outdoor patio despite opposition by some nearby residents, according to a decision by Howard County's hearing examiner. The owner of the once-rural bluegrass bar must wait to see whether appeals are filed and must obtain permission from the county liquor board, but Jason Cooke is hopeful that he will be able to proceed. The patio would likely open by next spring, he said. The decision prohibits outdoor music or a roof over the patio and would not allow patrons of an existing snowball stand to use it. Examiner Michele L. LeFaivre's decision requires either a 3-foot-high fence or 3-foot-high planters bordering the 1,128-square-foot patio and limits access to the outdoor seating to and from the restaurant.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | August 10, 2009
Baltimore's zoning board could gain new authority under legislation Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector plans to introduce Monday that supports a controversial live entertainment bill. Spector's measure would allow the Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals to reverse the property-use permission known as "conditional use" that the city currently grants but can never revoke. "What is given can be taken," Spector said. The bill says that exemptions to underlying zoning rules are not "out there for perpetuity," she said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2003
The fight over Howard County's plans to build a high school in Marriottsville was played out before the County Council at a public hearing last night as neighborhood residents opposed to the school's construction urged rejection of a seemingly obscure zoning bill. Although construction workers have begun work on the school, rushing to ready it for an August 2005 opening, residents fighting the project are trying to block zoning variances for height and setback granted for the building.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2003
There have been a lot of changes since the petition to build a warehouse near the community of Dorsey was first brought before the Board of Appeals in 2000. The developer has a new lawyer, two new board members are listening to the case and there is a new technical staff report on details of the proposed project. All of that underlines the complexity of a case that seems fated to go on for months. The prospective developer of the warehouse, Dorsey Rock LLC, is seeking a variance to build a 175,000-square-foot structure on a 16-acre property zoned for heavy manufacturing.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2003
The Howard County Council last night unanimously approved two zoning variances to clear the way for construction of a 12th county high school, on Woodford Drive in Marriottsville across from Mount View Middle School. The council action came despite determined opposition from residents who believe the site is too small and will generate too much traffic. "It's not an easy vote for me," said Councilman Allan H. Kittleman, a western county Republican, who said he is not happy with the size of the building or the process of selecting the site.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | September 12, 1990
The Trammell Crow Co. has received the zoning variance it was seeking to build the city's tallest building, a 44-story office tower called One Light Street on the current site of the vacant Southern Hotel.Gilbert Rubin, executive director of Baltimore's Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals, said his office notified the developers this week that their request for a zoning variance had been granted.The decision was based primarily on the belief that the $180 million to $190 million building "would be an asset to the downtown community and would add to the tax base," Mr. Rubin said.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 10, 1995
The proposed UMBC Research Park, which Baltimore County officials hope one day will generate 2,000 jobs and become a cornerstone of economic development on the southwest side, has lost its only tenant.Weary of waiting out a zoning battle with neighborhood opponents of the research park, Atlantic Pharmaceutical Services has told officials at the University of Maryland Baltimore County that it can wait no longer and wants to build elsewhere in Maryland.Atlantic Pharmaceutical, a subsidiary of NIRO Inc. of Columbia, will produce pills and capsules.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2001
The Les Jenkins Family Fun Park's bumpy ride seems to have ended in Anne Arundel County. Last night, Baltimore County developer Les Jenkins announced he would not press ahead with plans to build his go-cart park on Dover Road in Glen Burnie, because of a law effectively banning the park that was signed yesterday by County Executive Janet S. Owens hours before a zoning appeal hearing on his project. Enacted as emergency legislation so it would take effect immediately, the bill bans go-cart tracks from operating on commercial recreation property.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2001
A county hearing officer has denied a zoning variance sought by a Crownsville developer to build a house wider than allowed on a plot of waterfront land in Severna Park's Manhattan Beach - a victory for residents fighting the 6-foot difference. Administrative hearing officer Stephen M. LeGendre ruled that the plot at 759 Dividing Road is capable of being developed within the code. Severn Associates, headed by Steve Washington, wanted to tear down an existing house and build another that is 26 feet wide - 6 feet wider than permitted - and contended that a smaller house would be unattractive and nonfunctional.
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