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Zoning Change

NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2011
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold says he's considering using his seldom-used veto power to prevent controversial zoning changes in some of the county's most rural areas likely to be approved by the County Council on Monday night. The threat of veto follows the passage of several amendments to the proposed rezoning bill for southern Anne Arundel and the Annapolis area, parts of which county planning officials have publicly criticized for veering too sharply from accepted zoning principles.
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EXPLORE
July 27, 2011
It is disappointing that a mega-project like the YMCA/office building produces so few letters to the editor. People may wish they'd written when they see the huge number of trees that will be coming down to support the project. Parking for 270 cars? Working out something to ease traffic concerns? Here's a likely proposal: dualizing the road up to Bloomsbury Avenue, then carrying it north on Rolling Road by implementing the middle turning lane concept that has already been designed.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
They came asking for zoning for a car dealership, a landscaping company and a wedding chapel, saying that without proper approvals they would have to move their businesses. Others came with "Keep South County Rural" stickers, to protest proposed zoning changes that they said would intrude upon their way of life. One hundred and thirty five people testified before the Anne Arundel County Council on a bill that could yield broad zoning changes in the Annapolis and more rural South County areas.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2011
A proposed zoning change that would alter a key tool intended to spur redevelopment of the U.S. 1 commercial corridor and allow 140 more apartments in the highway median in North Laurel was approved on a 3-2 vote Monday night by the Howard County Council. The vote allows the owners of Ashbury Courts, a 148-unit, mixed-use complex built on the site of a former trailer park, to build a planned second apartment building on the north end of the parking lot, but this time without the accompanying retail space required under the original zoning.
EXPLORE
By Pat van den Beemt, pvdb@comcast.net | May 19, 2011
The Hereford Community Association's members voted unanimously to expand the group's boundaries at its April 12 meeting. The original boundaries were drawn in 1989 when the association formed and covered a half-mile radius from the intersection of Mount Carmel and York roads. Those boundaries were enlarged in 1998. Paul Cummins, association president, said many people who stopped by the HCA booth at theHereford Zone Business Association Expo in February expressed interest in joining, but live outside its boundaries.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
New zoning approved Wednesday night for Howard County's oldest shopping center would allow a mixture of apartments, offices and stores to replace the partly empty Normandy Center on U.S. 40 in Ellicott City. Over neighborhood objections, the county zoning board, composed of the five County Council members, unanimously approved a zoning change that will allow the dense development. Before the panel could issue that approval, members had to rule that the County Council had erred by denying "traditional neighborhood zoning" for the property during comprehensive rezoning in 2004.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2010
One of the largest proposed developments in Anne Arundel County won final approval Monday night after the County Council reversed a decision by County Executive John R. Leopold. In a rare veto override, the council voted unanimously to reinstate an earlier amendment rezoning the 300-acre property known as Arundel Gateway to allow for a 1,600-home development. Supporters say the project is needed to support job growth spurred by the federal base realignment and closure plan, or BRAC.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
Critics of a plan to build 325 homes on one part of historic Doughoregan Manor and preserve the rest of the Ellicott City estate attacked the complex proposal as a "manufactured artifice," as they tried this week to defeat a necessary zoning change. Opponents used the very intricacy of the multipart plan and the fact that Howard County's zoning board members also serve as County Council members as the basis for their argument. Several opponents also suggested that there might have been collusion between the estate's owners and county lawyers.
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