Advertisement
HomeCollectionsZoning Change
IN THE NEWS

Zoning Change

NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2010
Critics of a plan to build 325 homes on one part of historic Doughoregan Manor and preserve the rest of the Ellicott City estate attacked the complex proposal as a "manufactured artifice," as they tried this week to defeat a necessary zoning change. Opponents used the very intricacy of the multipart plan and the fact that Howard County's zoning board members also serve as County Council members as the basis for their argument. Several opponents also suggested that there might have been collusion between the estate's owners and county lawyers.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Howard County zoning doesn't provide for wineries and the county has none, which is something County Executive Ken Ulman intends to see changed. With the annual Wine in the Woods festival taking place this weekend in Columbia, Ulman said, he is tired of having no home-grown wine to show off. "As we walk around, we see no Howard County wineries, and that's got to end," he said at a news conference Thursday at Tin Lizzie Wine Works, a small "make your own" wine business on Way Back When farm in Clarksville, just off Route 32. Ulman said he is proposing a zoning regulation amendment that would for the first time spell out how to gain permission to start a winery in the county.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2010
The petition drive to block some zoning changes for the 30-year plan to redevelop central Columbia appears doomed, based on a preliminary review of signatures by the Howard County Board of Elections. After two days of counting, the board posted numbers on its Web site late Wednesday that showed the drive has a mathematical chance to pass its first hurdle but virtually no practical chance. Critics of the residential portion of the plan that would allow up to 5,500 new residences in town center need to have collected 2,501 valid signatures to pass the first requirement.
NEWS
By Noel Levy | January 14, 2010
R ecently there has been outrage over the revelation that the pensions for retiring members of the Baltimore County Council, after serving in office for 20 years, are $54,000 per year, for life. Outrageous as this may be, when it comes to what is wrong with Baltimore County government, it is just the tip of the iceberg. There is great excitement over the possibility that several Baltimore County Council seats may be changing hands in this year's election. Thinking beyond the pensions issue, it is important now to frame the top issues of governance that citizens should be focused on before next year's elections.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
A decision on whether to allow a large mixed-use project near the Dorsey MARC train station along Route 100 was postponed late Thursday night by the Howard County Planning Board. Oxford Square, which could have up to 1,400 apartments, 1 million square feet of commercial space, stores, and give the county a 5-acre school site, is different from two other train station proposals in the county, because it is across Route 100 from the station. The developers say they'll gain access to the train platforms via a 1749 easement that allows extension of an existing road along the railroad tracks from the station, under the highway bridges, directly into their property.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.