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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 27, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Zimbabwe's president, Robert G. Mugabe, has moved to require that virtually all public companies cede controlling interests to "indigenous citizens," a plan the government calls black empowerment and Mugabe's critics label a bid to shore up his crumbling political support. The proposal, issued in draft legislation published Monday, would transfer a 51 percent stake in the companies to Zimbabweans who were "disadvantaged by unfair discrimination on the grounds of his or her race" before April 1980, when the nation won independence from white rule.
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NEWS
June 22, 2007
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- Lebanon's defense minister declared victory yesterday over the Fatah Islam militant group, saying it had been crushed after a monthlong military assault on its stronghold in a northern refugee camp and only mopping up remained. A Muslim cleric who has been acting as a mediator said later that Fatah Islam agreed to stop firing, and calm descended over the Nahr el-Bared camp outside the port of Tripoli. The battle, Lebanon's worst internal violence since the 1975-1990 civil war, killed 76 soldiers, at least 60 militants and more than 20 civilians.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 30, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- It was an error that would have chagrined most newspapers. But editors at Zimbabwe's weekly Standard felt another emotion - fear - when an article this year misstated the type of fancy Mercedes-Benz delivered to the central bank governor. The bank threatened to go to the Media and Information Commission, which licenses newspapers, recalled Deputy Editor Bill Saidi. He worried that the commission might use that "falsehood" to close the newspaper, just as it had shut down three others in recent years for running afoul of Zimbabwe's draconian press laws.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 8, 2007
HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Keith Charumbira had just stepped off a minivan taxi in southwest Harare three weeks ago, fresh from a Friday evening gathering of civic advocates in Zimbabwe's capital city, when he saw the knot of policemen walking toward him. It was too late to flee. "They started asking questions," Charumbira said: "`Why are you active in an opposition party that is against the needs of the government? Don't you know you are part of a leadership that is leading to violence?' " The officers rifled through his pockets, Charumbira said, and took his cash, amounting to about $60. Then, for the next 20 minutes, they beat him. "They used batons," he said.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | March 19, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- It's Friday afternoon, and that means Daniel Chitungwiza is putting another package of rice, cooking oil and other basics on the overnight bus to his beleaguered mother and brothers back home in Zimbabwe. "They won't die without it," he said of the weekly shipments from South Africa, "but they will be hungry." As once-prosperous Zimbabwe's seven-year economic slide deepens, legions of expatriates like Chitungwiza are keeping their families afloat. They regularly send staples that their relatives - amid a 1,700 percent annual inflation rate - can no longer afford or even find on bare store shelves.
NEWS
March 14, 2007
Halliburton officials say shifting the oil service giant's center of gravity from Texas to the Persian Gulf is just a "strategic" move to drum up more oil business. Chief Executive David Lesar even lanced the announcement that he was moving himself and his CEO headquarters to the United Arab Emirates city of Dubai into the middle of a weekend energy conference in Bahrain. The implication: It is no big deal, especially since Halliburton promises not to reincorporate overseas, which would have huge tax consequences, or to uproot its 4,000-employee Houston headquarters.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 12, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Hundreds of Zimbabwe's riot police officers violently crushed yesterday an attempt by protesters to hold what they called a prayer meeting in one of the capital's largest slums to express opposition to President Robert G. Mugabe's rule. Beatrice Mtetwa, a civil rights lawyer in Harare, the capital, said at least 35 people had been arrested, including the leaders of the two rival political factions that oppose Mugabe's governing party, the Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front.
TRAVEL
December 17, 2006
Jaws On a recent trip to Africa, including Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe and South Africa, my wife and I saw a lot of wildlife. This wallowing hippo was seen in Hwange National Park with its powerful jaws open in an intimidating gesture. John L. Robinson Darlington
NEWS
By Erik German and Erik German,Newsday | December 17, 2006
VICTORIA FALLS, Zimbabwe -- A few miles south of the empty luxury hotels in this once-dazzling tourist spot, dozens of gaunt young men survive by scavenging food from the town dump. Allan Sibanda, 23, has been coming here on and off for the past five years, scuffling with baboons and vultures for the least-rotten scraps. Since midsummer, garbage has been his sole source of food, he said. "I think a lot about the way I'm living," he said, watching the horizon anxiously for the next rubbish truck.
NEWS
By James Kirchick | December 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Prompted by the death last week of former United Nations Ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, I looked up her essay from the November 1979 issue of Commentary magazine, "Dictatorships and Double Standards." Ms. Kirkpatrick, then a Democrat, excoriated the Carter administration for applying a double standard in its treatment of right-wing and Communist dictatorships. The former, she argued, can eventually be coaxed into democratization (or at least made amenable to United States interests)
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