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Zero Tolerance

NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1998
In the past three years, more people have been slain in Baltimore than the 632 city residents killed in the Korean and Vietnam wars combined.As the city moves toward finishing its ninth straight year with more than 300 homicides, the City Council -- with a municipal election year approaching -- is trying to hold Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke more accountable for the fifth-highest murder rate in the nation.Two weeks ago, the 19-member council passed a resolution renewing the call for Schmoke to adopt a so-called "zero tolerance" stance in dealing with the rising number of open-air illegal drug markets in the city, long considered the source of the bloodshed.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1999
Republican mayoral candidate David F. Tufaro yesterday picked up the endorsement of an African-American community group opposing Democratic nominee Martin O'Malley's plans to implement zero tolerance.Group leaders from Together Everyone Achieves More (TEAM), a small group of Southwest Baltimore community activists, said yesterday that they will back Tufaro, who supports the organization's call to create an intensive three-year drug rehabilitation and job training program. TEAM is pushing for more drug rehabilitation in the city.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1996
New York City will be the proving ground this week for two opposing city government delegations looking for solutions to Baltimore's high crime rate.Four members of the City Council will head to New York City later today to study that city's "zero tolerance" crime policy, which calls for arresting anyone who commits the pettiest of public offenses. The council delegation wants to show that the policy will work in Baltimore -- despite protests from Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier, who insists that it won't.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and JoAnna Daemmrich and Robert Guy Matthews and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
On a day when the city mourned the shooting death of a little boy, Baltimore's top two officials promoted their own, distinctly different approaches to trying to end the bloodshed.Hours before the funeral of James Smith III, a 3-year-old who was gunned down in a barbershop last week, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and Council President Lawrence A. Bell clashed over anti-crime strategies in separate news conferences.As they expressed their sympathy for the boy's family, the two questioned each other's leadership and differed on how to combat the violence.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
As City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III and Councilman Martin O'Malley push for a new police policy of near-zero tolerance in Baltimore, the question becomes: Can the pair complete the task when the mayor and the police commissioner vow to keep the status quo?Even if Bell and O'Malley can reconcile the ramifications of near-zero-tolerance policing -- such as clogged courtrooms and jails -- their biggest hurdle could be persuading other council members to listen to the message and to not pay attention to the messengers.
NEWS
October 11, 1997
THE CHASTISING tone of a progress report on zero tolerance police tactics was totally predictable. It was issued by a Baltimore City Council committee chaired by Martin O'Malley, whose crime-fighting philosophy differs sharply from that of Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier. Yet there is more common ground than you might expect.The police chief is doing a lot of what Mr. O'Malley wants, but Mr. Frazier refuses to call it "zero tolerance," the term Mr. O'Malley imported from New York. Although Mr. O'Malley will admit the commissioner has made progress, he downplays that and instead talks about what still needs doing.
NEWS
May 5, 1997
IF ZERO TOLERANCE can make it in New York City, can it succeed in Howard County? Apparently so. A police crackdown on crime in east Columbia's Long Reach village has closed an open-air drug market along Tamar Drive -- yes, even in suburbia -- that had become a troubled area for residents.The enforcement squeeze, modeled after New York's successful approach, has made trafficking disappear. For now.It is too early to say police have eliminated drug dealing in that vicinity. Law enforcement officials know all too well that it is much easier to scatter that activity than to eradicate it.Police Capt.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson and Jill Hudson,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1997
Drivers used to whizzing past schools at breakneck speeds this summer will pay a steep price if they don't slow down today: fines of as much as $500.Police will be operating radar and handing out tickets to speeders and aggressive drivers in school zones as students return to classes.It's the Police Department's H.A.S.T.E. ("Helping Arriving Students Through Enforcement") program to ensure the safety of students going to and coming from school.In a concerted effort during the next few weeks, Howard patrol officers will cite drivers who might need a reminder that schools are once again in business.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Anne Arundel County Police Chief Larry W. Tolliver touted his policies of a "zero tolerance" crackdown on street-level drug dealers and confiscation of cars used in crimes such as drug possession last night in Crofton.The measures would help stop the break-ins that are often committed by people looking for money to buy drugs, Tolliver told the Crofton Civic Association's board of directors and about 10 residents at a meeting at Crofton Elementary School."We're going after the people to send the right message that we're not going to put up with people using drugs, buying drugs and everything associated with it," said Tolliver, the former state police superintendent, who assumed his county post at the end of January.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1998
Chief Larry W. Tolliver ordered Anne Arundel County Police yesterday to stop seizing cars in simple drug possession cases, a rollback of his popular and controversial "zero tolerance" for drug trafficking.The move marked the first shift in a vigorous and highly publicized policy that has evoked praise from residents tired of drug activity and criticism from those who believe zero tolerance is overbearing and a threat to constitutional protections of due process.In a written directive issued in March 1997, Tolliver told officers to seize vehicles if anyone inside had drugs or if drugs were found in the vehicle, regardless of who owned the vehicle, or whether the owner knew of the drugs.
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