Advertisement
HomeCollectionsZeier
IN THE NEWS

Zeier

SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1998
After alternating quarterbacks during the first three games of the season, the Ravens appear ready to hand the starting job to backup Eric Zeier in Sunday's game against the visiting Cincinnati Bengals.Although Ravens coach Ted Marchibroda said he plans to announce his decision today, several sources indicated yesterday that Marchibroda is about to send Jim Harbaugh to the bench and give Zeier his first start of 1998."I have to decide what is the best way for us to beat Cincinnati," Marchibroda said.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | September 22, 1998
Pick a quarterback. Pick a running back. Throw downfield.That should be Ted Marchibroda's checklist for this week. If the Ravens' coach continues to act indecisively, he can expect his offense to do the same.His quarterback Sunday should be Eric Zeier. His running back should be Errict Rhett. His game plan should lean more to his wide receivers than his fullback.The offense wasn't solely to blame for Sunday's 24-10 loss to Jacksonville, not when the special teams were brutal and the defense allowed 519 yards.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Gary Lambrecht and Mike Preston and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1998
Coach Ted Marchibroda said yesterday that veteran Jim Harbaugh is likely to be the Ravens' starting quarterback Sunday against the Jacksonville Jaguars.Bothered by a hyper-extended ring finger on his right (throwing) hand and tendinitis in his right elbow, Harbaugh has played less than a half in the first two games.Backup Eric Zeier, bothered by a sore calf muscle this week, has relieved Harbaugh in both games, most recently completing 13 of 20 passes for 173 yards Sunday in the team's 24-10 win over the New York Jets.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | September 18, 1998
It's difficult to get too upset with Ravens coach Ted Marchibroda starting Jim Harbaugh at quarterback. If Harbaugh struggles at Jacksonville, Marchibroda can pull him as quickly as he did last week, and insert Eric Zeier.At least on the surface, the coach's decision appears clean, safe, almost predictable. He's going with the veteran. He's going with the incumbent. He's going with the player the Ravens acquired for a third-round draft pick last winter.Controversy avoided.But maybe not for long.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | September 14, 1998
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- For a winning locker room, not everyone had reason to be jubilant.Quarterback Jim Harbaugh iced his throbbing right elbow and ring finger, his starting job suddenly in jeopardy.Kicker Matt Stover reacted defiantly upon learning that coach Ted Marchibroda criticized him for a missed field-goal attempt.Running back Errict Rhett, normally the team's most animated player, was notably subdued.The Ravens finally arrived yesterday, and not simply because they won a road game against the arrogant Bill Parcells and his overrated New York Jets.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | September 13, 1998
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- At the time, it made little sense: Why would the Ravens trade for Jim Harbaugh, relegating Eric Zeier to the bench, and then sign Zeier to a two-year contract worth $2.6 million?Why would they spend precious salary cap money on a guy they had just layered over?Well, now we know why. Zeier played in the Ravens' season opener against the Steelers last week, and he might play again today against the Jets at the Meadowlands, depending on Harbaugh's sore elbow and injured finger.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1998
The Ravens are guardedly optimistic about the chances of quarterback Jim Harbaugh starting Sunday's game against the New York Jets, but the 12-year veteran said he is ready to play.Harbaugh took his usual repetitions with the first-team offense yesterday during a two-hour, 20-minute practice. If either his right index finger or right elbow were bothering him, he showed little discomfort completing intermediate and long passes.However, four starters -- middle linebacker Ray Lewis (hamstring)
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
It was a typical preseason game, boring and often sloppy, but at the same time an illustration of how far the Ravens have come during their three years in Baltimore.The Ravens used a complete defensive effort and the second-unit offense bailed out the first group in a 23-6 to win over the Philadelphia Eagles before 65,970 at Later To Be Named Stadium at Camden Yards.Ravens second-string quarterback Eric Zeier completed 11 of 15 passes for 159 yards, including a 34-yard touchdown pass to rookie wide receiver Patrick Johnson with 5: 04 left in the third quarter to break open the game as the Ravens took a 17-6 lead.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1998
The maturation of rookie wide receiver Patrick Johnson continued at a brisk pace last night. About as briskly as he blew past members of the Philadelphia secondary.Johnson, forced to start in place of the injured Jermaine Lewis, gave the Ravens another encouraging glimpse of the talent that compelled them to draft him in the second round.All Johnson did was play spark plug to the Ravens' sputtering offense in the second half. Take the play he made with 5: 04 left in the third quarter with the Ravens on the Eagles' 34 and leading 10-6.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Ryan Basen Sun staff writers Mike Preston and Eduardo Encina contributed to this article | August 13, 1998
Rookie cornerback Duane Starks, the Ravens' top draft pick who missed two weeks of training camp in a contract holdout, missed his first day of practice yesterday with a pulled right hamstring.Starks said he felt the hamstring tighten on Tuesday."Then I re-aggravated it near the end of practice," Starks said. "It will be all right. I just want to get in there."Coach Ted Marchibroda said he expects Starks to play in Saturday's preseason game against the New York Jets."Duane complained about it [Tuesday]
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.