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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 4, 2003
PORTLAND, Maine - So it takes an ecumenical group of zealots charging anti-Catholicism in an ad running in a state with a Greek Orthodox senator to make me fully understand the word chutzpah. I guess this is what it means to live in a multicultural society? This display of sheer gall began with the nomination of Alabama Attorney General William H. Pryor Jr. to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Mr. Pryor is anti-abortion, anti-gay rights, pro-school prayer. And Catholic. He most notably said, "God has chosen, through his son Jesus Christ, this time and this place for all Christians ... to save our country and save our courts."
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NEWS
By Neve Gordon | January 3, 2003
JERUSALEM - Polls indicate that Prime Minister Ariel Sharon is heading toward a landslide victory in the Jan. 28 Israeli election. Given his performance during his short tenure, his widespread support is astounding. Although Mr. Sharon is still considered to be Mr. Security, people are less secure today than before he took office 20 months ago. Since the eruption of the second Palestinian uprising, or intifada, Sept. 29, 2000, the day after Mr. Sharon visited the Temple Mount, 681 Israelis have been killed and 4,823 have been wounded, the majority in the past 20 months, Israeli army figures show.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | October 23, 2002
CHARLES MOOSE, the police chief in Montgomery County, thinks it was unwise for the governor of Maryland to call the sniper a coward, apparently because such public name-calling is counterproductive in the delicate "dialogue" the police are trying to establish with this killer. "The governor's training is not in the law enforcement field," Moose said. "I am convinced the governor will never do that again." And he hasn't. But I wouldn't knock him if he did. Really. What's more cowardly than what this sniper has been doing?
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 29, 2002
WASHINGTON -- I refuse to make this one of Those Stories. You know the type. Those moist, somehow facile, stories about absolute good wrested from the heart of incomprehensible evil. Those heartwarming stories that speak of brotherhood, that make you hopeful, that point toward God, abiding. Nothing wrong with those stories. I just don't want this to be one of them. And that will be difficult because the facts certainly bend themselves in that direction. Recently, Jonathan Jesner, a 19-year-old Jewish kid from Scotland, was critically injured on a bus in Tel Aviv by a Palestinian suicide bomber.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and By Jim Haner,Sun Staff | July 28, 2002
Cocaine: An Unauthorized Biography, by Dominic Streatfeild. St. Martin's Press. 498 pages. $27.95. It has been said that there is no greater sensation on earth than a cocaine high. In very short order, a snort of the glimmering white powder produces an overwhelming feeling of well-being, mental clarity and boundless energy -- not to mention a sort of post-orgasmic glow in the solar plexus. Smoking it only intensifies the feeling. Injecting it, well, that defies description. Given a limitless supply of the stuff in their water, laboratory animals will abandon food, sleep, sex, grooming and all other drugs, dosing themselves until they literally die of exhaustion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul McHugh and Paul McHugh,Special to the Sun | March 17, 2002
In 1991, Mary Ann Glendon, the Learned Hand Professor of Jurisprudence at Harvard Law School, wrote a discerning book, Rights Talk: The Impoverishment of Political Discourse (The Free Press, 218 pages, $22.95) in which she noted that contemporary American discourse over such issues as property, sexual activity, abortion, social welfare and the like was deteriorating into sound bites, slogans and the strident language of "my rights." In this process our opinions were becoming hyperpolarized, exaggeratedly absolute, coarsely self-centered and remarkably silent about personal, civic and collective responsibilities.
NEWS
January 28, 2002
WHAT LEGAL consequence befalls John Walker Lindh will properly be decided in a federal courthouse. But how the nation comes to terms with this puzzling young man is a more complex matter. He's a 20-year-old, middle-class kid who seems more confused than malevolent, more daffy than threatening. The accent he feigned when he was captured and the silly bravado he has exhibited since betray an immaturity that is eerily common among this country's young adults. And yet Mr. Lindh took up with a very dangerous enemy, and involved himself in a violent religious movement that took a staggering number of American lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 4, 2001
"Trust Us, We're Experts: How Industry Manipulates Science and Gambles With Your Future" by Sheldon Rampton and John Stauber (Tarcher / Putnam, 360 pages, $24.95). Commercial interest groups and companies, and the public relations people who work for them, have virtually destroyed the ostensible objectivity of non-profits, university authorities, influential charities and much of the news media, according to this angry and often well-documented tract. Drug companies buy approvals from prestigious good-works organizations; physicians writing letters to medical journals have been well paid by tobacco interests.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1999
Carroll County Republicans overwhelmingly supported their party's central committee last night in going ahead with the raffle of a 9 mm pistol for $5 a ticket as a fund-raiser.The nine-member committee heard public comment for about 30 minutes before meeting behind closed doors. The meeting in Westminster was attended by about 40 people, most of whom favored the gun raffle.During the closed portion of the meeting, Betty L. Smith, committee vice chairwoman, presented a motion to reconsider last month's vote to hold the handgun raffle.
NEWS
January 1, 1999
IT TAKES neither genie nor wise man to be wary of coming attractions this January.In this new year, may sane and sensible minds in the Senate accede to the urging -- no, the demands -- of the American people who desperately desire a quick end to the national nightmare called impeachment. Otherwise, it is going to be a long, cold winter and national discontent may reach the boiling point.The first major event of January, the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton impacts the month's second important congressional attraction -- President Clinton's State of the Union Address.
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