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By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1996
Wall Street reacted with immediate disapproval to Youth Services International's announcement yesterday that it was pulling out of a deal to acquire Three Springs Inc., a Huntsville, Ala., operator of programs for emotionally troubled adolescents.After the deal fell through, the stock of publicly traded Owings Mills-based Youth Services International Inc. dropped more than percent, closing at $17.75, down $2.50. Little more than two months ago, Wall Street pumped up Youth Services' stock by 14 percent on the news that the national operator of juvenile delinquent centers would boost revenues by more than a third with the acquisition of Three Springs.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1998
Youth Services International Inc., the Owings Mills operator of facilities for juvenile offenders, yesterday reported fourth-quarter income of $4 million, or 39 cents a basic share.While the profit was more than quadruple the $965,000, or 10 cents a basic share, earned in the fourth quarter of 1996, it included a $6.1 million pretax gain from the sale of the company's behavioral health business.Revenue for the three months ended Dec. 31 dipped to $23.3 million vs. $29.3 million in the 1996 period.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1999
State legislators called top juvenile justice officials everything but competent yesterday in a pointed hearing that showed a series of fundamental mistakes led to a rape and the escape of five delinquents from Maryland's highest-security juvenile jails.Roberto de Jesus, secretary of the Department of Juvenile Justice, sat on the hot seat next to a top official from the company hired to run the jails. Both promised improvement while agreeing that a shortage of staff, blunders by workers and lax supervision contributed to the incidents at the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School and the Victor Cullen Academy.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1999
Under pressure for a series of security breaches -- including the rape of a staff member -- the company operating two Maryland juvenile jails has responded by firing a $7-an-hour dishwasher who was assigned guard duty because of a staff shortage.The dishwasher, Dwane Williams, 38, and others say he was fired to divert attention to staff shortages that have forced numerous employees at the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School to work double shifts and have left some shifts uncovered.Williams said that he had not been disciplined since he began work there almost a year ago and that his supervisor told him as she fired him that he had been an "outstanding" employee.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1998
Youth Services International Inc. announced yesterday that it expects to report earnings for the quarter ending June 30 and the rest of the year that are substantially below expectations, sending its share price plummeting 54 percent.The Owings Mills operator of facilities for juvenile offenders, which is in the midst of an acquisition spree, has experienced delays in opening new and expanded facilities, said Timothy P. Cole, YSI's chairman and chief executive."When you have a company that has grown like this, it's susceptible to short-term swings," he said.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1999
One of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's closest friends and advisers is regularly taking on clients who pay him to get the governor's ear, help them in disputes with state agencies and serve as their advocate.Lance W. Billingsley's clients have included a company that runs two of Maryland's juvenile justice facilities, a state contractor that collects child support payments and an Indian tribe trying to gain state recognition.Billingsley, a lawyer who chairs the University of Maryland's board of regents, created a stir last month when he said he was launching a lobbying career.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2001
Two employees of a Maryland jail for juveniles have been fired amid allegations they ran a "Saturday Morning Fight Club," pitting teens with drug and alcohol problems against each other to settle disputes with their fists, state officials said yesterday. A third employee resigned from the privately run facility, and officials said the number of employees found to be involved might grow. One of those accused of staging fights was hired in apparent violation of state policy. Responsible for overseeing teens with addiction problems, the employee has a criminal record for drug distribution, according to a source familiar with an investigation into the allegations.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff Reporter Laura Lippman contributed to this story | July 25, 1991
A Baltimore businessman who was a prime advocate of putting Maryland's largest facility for juvenile offenders into private hands is now wondering why his new firm failed to win a contract to do the job.W. James Hindman, who founded Youth Services International in the hopes that he would be selected to run the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School, yesterday turned a routine meeting of the state Board of Public Works into a debate over what kinds of treatment are best suited for delinquents.Hindman, founder and former president of Jiffy Lube Inc., lost out in a bidding process that pitted his new group against five other companies, although YSI's bid was about $10 million less than that of winning vendor Rebound of Colorado.
NEWS
By From staff reports | February 2, 1999
In Baltimore County Dulaney High opens $6.9 million addition to ease crowding TIMONIUM -- The county's second-largest high school became a little bigger yesterday as Dulaney High School opened a $6.9 million, three-story addition with a ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by educators, parents, students and politicians. "It's a great new building," said senior Keith Becraft, president of Dulaney's student government. "Now we can finally get rid of all of the trailers on the parking lot."
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1995
Youth Services International Inc. said yesterday that its earnings for the three months that ended in March were up more than 50 percent over last year's quarter, not counting a one-time tax break that inflated the 1994 results.The Owings Mills-based company also announced the departure of Chief Financial Officer Harry G. Pappas Jr., who joined YSI only last September.The company said it earned $676,000 during the quarter, or 12 cents a share. In the same three months last year, Youth Services earned $702,000, or 14 cents a share.
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