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Youth Violence

NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1998
They don't look so tough now. Not here, shepherded into a middle school auditorium, surrounded by police, parole agents and judges.Twenty young men ages 16 to 24 -- young but street-tough, on probation or parole for serious crimes -- were back at school in South Baltimore's Cherry Hill last night, this time for a lesson in deterrence. The visual aids were mug shots of the neighborhood's alleged Veronica Avenue Boys, until recently a drug-trafficking gang presumably more violent, more terrifying than anyone in the auditorium.
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | January 11, 1995
A network is premiering tonight, but that's using "network" in the loosest possible terms. The Warner Bros. TV network, called WB, launches with three Wednesday-night shows, and Wednesday is the only night up and running right now for the entire network. Not that it's running everywhere -- in Baltimore, for example, WB is found only on Towson State Television, a low-power station broadcast from the college campus. But before you feel you're being denied access to some major on-ramp on the information superhighway, let me reassure you: I've seen all three series premiering tonight on WB and wish I hadn't.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore's police commissioner used the ornate setting of the White House yesterday to promote his youth crime programs and to describe to a national audience how his department helps troubled children.Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier showcased the Goodnow Police Athletic League Center in Northeast Baltimore with a five-minute tape showing officers helping children who otherwise might be out on dangerous streets."Mature police officers understand that we cannot arrest our way out of this dilemma of youth crime," Frazier told Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | May 7, 1999
THERE is much not to like in American popular culture: rock groups that celebrate the morbid and gruesome, the virtual gore of video games, vicious and misogynist rap, Internet sites that incite hate in the name of everything from abortion opposition to White Revolution. And more, probably worse.In the understandable urge to discover what probably will elude us, we search in the media mishmash for incitements that will explain why two youths armed like guerrillas came to murder 13 in their Colorado school and kill themselves as if that were just about the neatest way you could end such a swell party.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
At age 14, police say, Radames Reyes ordered a pizza with the intention of robbing the deliveryman - and shot him when he failed to comply with the teenager's demands. Reyes, now 15, was identified after police obtained the phone number that placed the order and used cell towers to triangulate its location, a technology that is being increasingly used to track suspects. Witnesses later told police that Reyes told them he had committed the killing Nov. 23 of Adam Diarra, 22, who was shot in the Wakefield community, according to charging documents.
NEWS
By Newsday | January 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It didn't go well for New York City's first black police commissioner when he publicly broached the subject of black-on-black crime more than six years ago."I was called an 'Uncle Tom' then," said former Commissioner Benjamin Ward, who termed the escalating rate of crimes against blacks by blacks one of the community's "dirty little secrets.""There's a kind of realization that has come around now that this violence will do us in if we don't do something about it," he said.Today and tomorrow, some of the nation's most influential black politicians, entertainers and civic leaders will meet in Washington for what they say will be a frank summit on what the black community can do to quell the devastating tide of black-on-black crime and youth violence.
TOPIC
By Martin P. Welch | March 19, 2000
Last year's rampage at Columbine High School, the nation's worst schoolhouse shooting spree, left America numb and hoping such senseless killings would end. They haven't. Recently, a 6-year-old Michigan boy took a handgun to school and killed a classmate; a 7-year-old Alabama boy fatally shot a 5-year-old neighbor with an air gun loaded with pellets or BB shot; a man shot and killed three victims near Pittsburgh in an apparent hate crime; a Memphis gunman reportedly killed four people at a fire scene; and recently in Baltimore County, a mentally disturbed man allegedly shot and killed four people.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
Howard County schools need to increase spending, staffing and training to fight the county's alarming rise in youth violence, says a new study on disruptive young people in the county.The school system also should work more closely with other agencies in the community and consider starting an alternative program to educate expelled students and other youths who aren't in school, the report concludes."Our biggest concern is not the fact that we have a violent school system but trends we see in the school system and the community," said Donald McBrien, the schools' director of pupil services and chairman of the committee.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 11, 1994
Washington -- Jesse Jackson was looking very much like a has-been as recently as two months ago.After building up hopes, then ducking out of running for mayor of the District of Columbia, his stellar career as a tree-shaker and headline grabber seemed to slide to the brink of oblivion.After two unsuccessful campaigns for president, his campaign for District of Columbia statehood, a stillborn issue that he single-handedly reignited, was going nowhere fast. His opposition to NAFTA left his image almost as battered as Ross Perot's opposition left his. Mr. Jackson was marching tirelessly for various causes, but was anyone listening?
NEWS
November 21, 2010
The departure of Donald DeVore marks the end of yet another secretary who has failed to turn around Maryland's most troubled agency, the Department of Juvenile Services. Mr. DeVore announced Thursday that he would not seek reappointment and was considering career opportunities outside the state. His withdrawal perhaps just saves Gov. Martin O'Malley from having to fire him so that the department, which has been plagued by persistent organizational and security problems, can finally begin to move ahead.
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