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Youth Violence

FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | January 11, 1995
A network is premiering tonight, but that's using "network" in the loosest possible terms. The Warner Bros. TV network, called WB, launches with three Wednesday-night shows, and Wednesday is the only night up and running right now for the entire network. Not that it's running everywhere -- in Baltimore, for example, WB is found only on Towson State Television, a low-power station broadcast from the college campus. But before you feel you're being denied access to some major on-ramp on the information superhighway, let me reassure you: I've seen all three series premiering tonight on WB and wish I hadn't.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore's police commissioner used the ornate setting of the White House yesterday to promote his youth crime programs and to describe to a national audience how his department helps troubled children.Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier showcased the Goodnow Police Athletic League Center in Northeast Baltimore with a five-minute tape showing officers helping children who otherwise might be out on dangerous streets."Mature police officers understand that we cannot arrest our way out of this dilemma of youth crime," Frazier told Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | May 7, 1999
THERE is much not to like in American popular culture: rock groups that celebrate the morbid and gruesome, the virtual gore of video games, vicious and misogynist rap, Internet sites that incite hate in the name of everything from abortion opposition to White Revolution. And more, probably worse.In the understandable urge to discover what probably will elude us, we search in the media mishmash for incitements that will explain why two youths armed like guerrillas came to murder 13 in their Colorado school and kill themselves as if that were just about the neatest way you could end such a swell party.
NEWS
By Newsday | January 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It didn't go well for New York City's first black police commissioner when he publicly broached the subject of black-on-black crime more than six years ago."I was called an 'Uncle Tom' then," said former Commissioner Benjamin Ward, who termed the escalating rate of crimes against blacks by blacks one of the community's "dirty little secrets.""There's a kind of realization that has come around now that this violence will do us in if we don't do something about it," he said.Today and tomorrow, some of the nation's most influential black politicians, entertainers and civic leaders will meet in Washington for what they say will be a frank summit on what the black community can do to quell the devastating tide of black-on-black crime and youth violence.
TOPIC
By Martin P. Welch | March 19, 2000
Last year's rampage at Columbine High School, the nation's worst schoolhouse shooting spree, left America numb and hoping such senseless killings would end. They haven't. Recently, a 6-year-old Michigan boy took a handgun to school and killed a classmate; a 7-year-old Alabama boy fatally shot a 5-year-old neighbor with an air gun loaded with pellets or BB shot; a man shot and killed three victims near Pittsburgh in an apparent hate crime; a Memphis gunman reportedly killed four people at a fire scene; and recently in Baltimore County, a mentally disturbed man allegedly shot and killed four people.
NEWS
By TIM RUTTEN and TIM RUTTEN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 26, 2006
See Jane Hit: Why Girls Are Growing More Violent and What Can Be Done About It James Garbarino Penguin / 304 pages / $25.95 In Girl World, the primeval land of catty, jealous adolescent females that was described in such colorful and alarming detail by Rosalind Wiseman in Queen Bees and Wannabes and Rachel Simmons in Odd Girl Out, baby boomer parents found their worst nightmares about their daughters confirmed. The sugar-and-spice darlings might still look pretty in pink, but they could be just as power-hungry and aggressive as their combative, in-your-face brothers.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
Howard County schools need to increase spending, staffing and training to fight the county's alarming rise in youth violence, says a new study on disruptive young people in the county.The school system also should work more closely with other agencies in the community and consider starting an alternative program to educate expelled students and other youths who aren't in school, the report concludes."Our biggest concern is not the fact that we have a violent school system but trends we see in the school system and the community," said Donald McBrien, the schools' director of pupil services and chairman of the committee.
NEWS
March 31, 2004
Commissioners OK bonds to help company expand The Carroll County commissioners authorized yesterday $10 million in industrial revenue bonds to help Shelter Systems Limited acquire land and expand its company. The bonds will help Shelter Systems, a manufacturer of floor and roof trusses, buy 25 acres at Meadow Branch Industrial Park in Westminster. The company plans to construct a 130,000-square-foot building on the property. Federal revenue bonds provide the funding, and the county serves as a conduit for the funds.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | September 3, 2008
Six public schools that received city funding for after-school programs last year will not get that money this year, leaving principals scrambling for activities to occupy youngsters and some City Council members crying foul. The shortfall will affect about 450 children ages 5 through 15, according to Baltimore's Safe and Sound Campaign. The reductions are in part because of cuts this year from the city and the school system and because of a new emphasis from the mayor's office on allocating funds to high school students and three neighborhoods with high youth violence rates.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2000
Like so many Baltimore teen-agers, Atlantis Alston knows a peer who has been killed. Her friend, Tiesha Kelly, knows kids who belong to gangs or sell drugs. Now they want to know what adults plan to do about it. Their search for solutions to the violent climate troubling Baltimore led them to an "Urban Adolescent Violence" workshop yesterday at the Sheppard Pratt Conference Center. It was run by David Miller, a former Calverton Middle School teacher who tries to steer kids away from trouble.
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