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Youth Violence

NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore's police commissioner used the ornate setting of the White House yesterday to promote his youth crime programs and to describe to a national audience how his department helps troubled children.Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier showcased the Goodnow Police Athletic League Center in Northeast Baltimore with a five-minute tape showing officers helping children who otherwise might be out on dangerous streets."Mature police officers understand that we cannot arrest our way out of this dilemma of youth crime," Frazier told Hillary Rodham Clinton.
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NEWS
By Tom Teepen | May 7, 1999
THERE is much not to like in American popular culture: rock groups that celebrate the morbid and gruesome, the virtual gore of video games, vicious and misogynist rap, Internet sites that incite hate in the name of everything from abortion opposition to White Revolution. And more, probably worse.In the understandable urge to discover what probably will elude us, we search in the media mishmash for incitements that will explain why two youths armed like guerrillas came to murder 13 in their Colorado school and kill themselves as if that were just about the neatest way you could end such a swell party.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | March 25, 2009
At age 14, police say, Radames Reyes ordered a pizza with the intention of robbing the deliveryman - and shot him when he failed to comply with the teenager's demands. Reyes, now 15, was identified after police obtained the phone number that placed the order and used cell towers to triangulate its location, a technology that is being increasingly used to track suspects. Witnesses later told police that Reyes told them he had committed the killing Nov. 23 of Adam Diarra, 22, who was shot in the Wakefield community, according to charging documents.
NEWS
By Newsday | January 7, 1994
WASHINGTON -- It didn't go well for New York City's first black police commissioner when he publicly broached the subject of black-on-black crime more than six years ago."I was called an 'Uncle Tom' then," said former Commissioner Benjamin Ward, who termed the escalating rate of crimes against blacks by blacks one of the community's "dirty little secrets.""There's a kind of realization that has come around now that this violence will do us in if we don't do something about it," he said.Today and tomorrow, some of the nation's most influential black politicians, entertainers and civic leaders will meet in Washington for what they say will be a frank summit on what the black community can do to quell the devastating tide of black-on-black crime and youth violence.
TOPIC
By Martin P. Welch | March 19, 2000
Last year's rampage at Columbine High School, the nation's worst schoolhouse shooting spree, left America numb and hoping such senseless killings would end. They haven't. Recently, a 6-year-old Michigan boy took a handgun to school and killed a classmate; a 7-year-old Alabama boy fatally shot a 5-year-old neighbor with an air gun loaded with pellets or BB shot; a man shot and killed three victims near Pittsburgh in an apparent hate crime; a Memphis gunman reportedly killed four people at a fire scene; and recently in Baltimore County, a mentally disturbed man allegedly shot and killed four people.
NEWS
November 12, 1992
After being forced to scuttle a University of Maryland conference on genetic links to violent crime earlier this year, federal officials are again mired in controversy over research aimed at rescuing the country from violent crime.The dispute concerns a proposed study on the causes and prevention of violent crime among youths, which has climbed alarmingly in recent years. A report by the National Crime Analysis Project at Northeastern University, for example, found that the number of 17-year-olds arrested for murder rose 121 percent from 1985 through 1991.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
Howard County schools need to increase spending, staffing and training to fight the county's alarming rise in youth violence, says a new study on disruptive young people in the county.The school system also should work more closely with other agencies in the community and consider starting an alternative program to educate expelled students and other youths who aren't in school, the report concludes."Our biggest concern is not the fact that we have a violent school system but trends we see in the school system and the community," said Donald McBrien, the schools' director of pupil services and chairman of the committee.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 29, 2013
When Munir Bahar, the 32-year-old chief organizer of the 300 Men March, told me he used a dirt bike show to lure people into the street to hear his anti-violence speech, I winced. The operation of dirt bikes on city streets is illegal. They are widely considered a menace by people who live in Baltimore's rowhouse neighborhoods. Homeowners frequently call the police to complain about dirt bikes. But one man's noisy nuisance is another's rapscallion pleasure or, in Bahar's thinking, a way to draw a crowd.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The founder of last year's 300 Men March and two Baltimore City Council members held an emergency planning meeting Friday evening at City Hall, saying the bloody start to the new year spurred them to develop a violence prevention strategy sooner than they had originally anticipated. The city recorded 16 homicides in the first 12 days of the year. January's toll stood at 18 as of Friday night. Last year, there were 235 homicides in Baltimore, an 8 percent increase over 2012 and a four-year high.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1998
Tavon Middleton was known for his fade-away jump shot that routinely sailed through the metal hoop at his neighborhood basketball court in Northeast Baltimore, across from Clifton Park.Yesterday, a day after the 15-year-old was gunned down in front of his home, his friends wrote a tribute to their slain friend on the court: "R.I.P. Tavon, 1983-1998, You'll Be Missed."It is a simple statement that speaks to a city struggling to curtail youth violence that continues, despite an ambitious initiative launched by police in January to clamp down on young offenders.
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