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Youth Orchestra

NEWS
September 20, 2000
The student: Kevin McGovern, 11 School: Mount View Middle School Special achievement: Last year, he was accepted to play the bass in the Maryland Youth Symphony Orchestra. What he says about it: "I was the youngest person chosen since I was in elementary school and it was a high school orchestra. I auditioned without even knowing what it was for. Then Mr. Gatto, the director of the orchestra, said, `I want you to be in my orchestra.' I was excited, and my mom was substitute teaching in my school that day and Mr. Gatto told her and that was great."
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NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
A hotshot quintet called Classical Jam — Jennifer Choi, violin; Cyrus Beroukhim, viola; Wendy Law, cello; Marco Granados, flute; Justin Hines, percussion — was formed recently "to reach out to diverse audiences" and promote classical music "to people who feel that they cannot relate to it, or for one reason or another, are not exposed to it." One way Classical Jam fulfills that mission is through collaborative projects and the creation of new music. The ensemble is heading to Maryland for a residency next week at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda and a side trip to Baltimore that promises interesting sounds for veteran and novice classical music listeners alike.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2001
My fondest hope is that the youngsters of the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra go on to enjoy many, many years of top-flight music-making after they "graduate" from the local ensemble. But if they do, I doubt they'll play with a pianist any more giving both musically and personally than Brian Ganz, who played Beethoven's G major Piano Concerto with them at Saturday's "Gala Spring Concert" at Maryland Hall. Ganz, the Annapolis-based concert pianist who is now a full-fledged member of the piano faculty at Baltimore's Peabody Institute, gave us a performance to remember.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | January 7, 1994
Three young pianists from three counties will make their concerto debuts with the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra this month.Sara Jones, a senior at Easton High School in Talbot County, Erin Wagner, a junior at Northern High School in Calvert County and Erika Knepp, a sophomore at South River High School, will each perform a movement of Mozart's celestial Piano Concerto No. 17, K.453, with conductor Arne Running on the podium.The Ward Alan Virts Memorial Concerto Competition won by these young women was held in Annapolis Nov. 21 and was jointly sponsored by the CYSO and the Anne Arundel Music Teachers Association.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2004
At age 15, children are smack-dab in the middle of their teen-age years. What better moment for a parent to step back, appraise them and utter those time-honored words, "My, how you've grown." The same goes for orchestras, as we'll see this weekend when Anne Arundel County's very own Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra takes center stage at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts for a concert commemorating the 15th birthday of the ensemble that's become one of Maryland's foremost musical organizations for the young.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 2001
Some of Maryland's finest young musicians will come together Saturday evening when the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra presents its Gala Spring Concert at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis. The 7 p.m. concert will be led by the orchestra's music director, David Ik-Sung Choo, who will conduct works by Tchaikovsky, Lalo and Beethoven in addition to the "Elegy" composed by Raymond Weidner, composer and choirmaster at Woods Memorial Presbyterian Church in Severna Park. Soloing in the first movement of Edouard Lalo's sultry "Symphonie Espagnole" will be violinist Robert Burnett, 17, of Bowie, winner of this season's Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2002
Judging from the results of Friday evening's Spring Gala Concert presented by the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra, conductor David Choo is presiding over a flexible and expressive ensemble. Taking center stage at this Maryland Hall program of works by Saint-Saens, Grieg, Mussorgsky, and Tchaikovsky was the string section, which delivered eloquent, emotionally engaged playing in challenging repertoire. The flutes, oboes, clarinets and trumpets among the players, ages 8 to 18, acquitted themselves well in music notable for its diversity.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2003
When David Choo decided to end his five-year tenure as conductor of the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra last season, the music world took notice. Fifty-two conductors from 21 states and three foreign countries (Britain, Italy and Austria) submitted applications to the orchestra's search committee for the job of conducting one of Maryland's premier young people's orchestras, said Robert Posten, a professional trombonist and CYSO parent who headed the group. The committee selected Julien Benichou, a French-born maestro who has trained under of Gustav Meier of Baltimore's Peabody Institute, one of the world's most renowned nurturers of young conducting talent.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2004
A program of opera favorites being performed on the Maryland Hall stage is hardly news. What is out of the ordinary is that the accompanying ensemble will be the talented young musicians of the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra. For the first time, the CYSO will be an opera orchestra, says Julien Benichou, the French-born, Baltimore-based conductor in his first year as music director of one of Maryland's premiere youth orchestras. "I think it's very nice for kids to accompany singers," Benichou says.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2004
A program of opera favorites being performed on the Maryland Hall stage is hardly news. What is out of the ordinary is that the accompanying ensemble will be the talented young musicians of the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra. For the first time, the CYSO will be an opera orchestra, says Julien Benichou, the French-born, Baltimore-based conductor in his first year as music director of one of Maryland's premiere youth orchestras. "I think it's very nice for kids to accompany singers," Benichou says.
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