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SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 21, 2004
WHEN HE HEARS sports talk radio callers say blow up the Wizards, Washington general manager Ernie Grunfeld thinks back to the start of the season. Fans were "unbelievably supportive" of the Wizards' plan to rebuild with young players, to go about things "the right way." "The city understood that," Grunfeld said. Way back then - it seems so long ago - the post-Michael Jordan Wizards were running and gunning, taking down Western Conference powers such as the Mavericks. Free-agent gym rat Gilbert Arenas was looking every bit the $64 million answer.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2001
WASHINGTON - The comeback road Michael Jordan traveled the past few months included back spasms, broken ribs and sore knees. In the end, nothing could deter the 38-year-old legend from his decision to return to the NBA after a three-year absence. Not even the prospect of a $35 million pay cut. In a statement he released yesterday, Jordan said he will sign a two-year contract with the Washington Wizards, the franchise he joined 20 months ago as president of basketball operations, and will donate all of this season's $1 million salary to relief efforts for victims of the Sept.
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August 16, 2011
The Lansdowne, Baltimore Highlands and Riverview communities are initiating a Pop Warner youth football program that will play on Saturdays on the artificial turf football field at Lansdowne High School. Kevin Williams, chairman of the Lansdowne Ravens program, said he is excited about its debut Saturday afternoon. Long hours have gone into obtaining the necessary permits, sponsors and donations. In addition to the young players, coaches and parents have also put in their time in practices, on and off the field.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | September 2, 1999
Look at the standings. The Orioles entered September in last place, stumbling toward 90 losses. That is who they are, and no amount of executive finger-pointing or clubhouse grumbling can change that fact.Deal with it, gentlemen.If you're the owner, remember that it is you who hired the general manager and manager that you might fire at the end of the season.If you're the manager, go out with some dignity, without blaming others for your failings.And if you're the displaced center fielder, understand that your team is out of contention and that the organization must make decisions on young players -- yes, even one who plays your position.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2002
FORT LAUDERDALE - If the Orioles are going to make good on the promise of youth that has sprung from a difficult rebuilding process, they need to show significant progress both on the field and in the American League East standings during the 2002 season. That was the message vice president of baseball operations Syd Thrift delivered to his staff during four days of front office meetings last week. It's time to prove to the fans that the club's long-term plan is going to work. "This is really a test year," Thrift said.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun reporter | December 16, 2006
Dawan Landry makes sure to spend some quality time in hot- and cold-water tubs after practice. Haloti Ngata can lean on the counsel of 10-year veteran Trevor Pryce. And Sam Koch keeps the punting to a minimum during the days leading up to a game. Those are just a few of the tactics Ravens rookies have used this fall to avoid the dreaded "rookie wall" in a season that has already exceeded in duration any they have played on the collegiate level. And thus far, the first-year players have withstood the physical and mental grind of the season admirably.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,SUN REPORTER | September 22, 2007
ARLINGTON, Texas -- It happens often. Orioles second baseman Brian Roberts will get into a discussion with a competitor about various players in the game and Nick Markakis' name will come up. "I was talking to [the Boston Red Sox's] Mike Lowell the other day when he was on second base, and he said, `Man, [Markakis] is one of my favorite young players. I respect those guys that can drive in those kinds of runs without hitting 40 homers,' " Roberts said. "I know guys on every team that are impressed daily by the way he plays and his ability level.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and Jeff Zrebiec,Sun Reporter | November 8, 2007
LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Melvin Mora dearly wants to remain an Oriole, but at this point of his career, he also desperately wants to be on a winning team. That's why the longest-tenured Oriole acknowledged yesterday that he would consider dropping his blanket no-trade clause if the team enters a rebuilding stage that would likely result in more losing in the short term. "I want to see what they say, and when [president of baseball operations] Andy MacPhail calls me and calls my agent, we'll go from there," said Mora, an Oriole since 2000.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney and Buster Olney,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Roch Eric Kubatko contributed to this article | March 3, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- The Orioles have taken strong stances in contract negotiations with their highest-paid players, Mike Mussina and Cal Ripken. But a handful of young players found out the club is serious about holding costs on all contracts.Unable to reach agreements with infielders Manny Alexander, Willis Otanez and Danny Magee, pitcher Esteban Yan and catcher Cesar Devarez, the Orioles yesterday unilaterally renewed the contracts of those players, as teams are permitted to do.The Orioles used to generously pay players with less than three years' experience.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 19, 1991
CARLISLE, Pa. -- If it's near the end of the first week of training camp, Joe Gibbs must be complaining about the NFL's 80-player roster limit.Gibbs, the Washington Redskins' coach, is one of the most vocal opponents of the cost-cutting measure adopted three years ago.And Gibbs gets frustrated at the end of the first week when he sends the veteran receivers and tight ends home briefly and is left with half a squad.He'll have 40 healthy players and four injured ones in camp until the veterans arrive this weekend.
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