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By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
Juvenile offenders who have been ordered to pay restitution may soon get a chance to earn the money to pay back their victims.A program known as Earn-It will provide jobs to nonviolent juveniles, said Harry W. Langmead, the state Department of Juvenile Services' assistant secretary for field services. The program that will be unveiled Oct. 9 to Carroll County business leaders will be a model for the state, he said.The cost in Carroll, to be paid by the juvenile services department, will be about $35,000 annually, he said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Mark D. Metzger, who was director of youth initiatives for the Baltimore County Police Department for more than 30 years and was recognized for his work with juvenile delinquents and their families, died April 9 of lung cancer at his Stoney Beach home in Anne Arundel County. He was 65. "Dr. Metzger served the citizens of Baltimore County for over 32 years. He was a dedicated and outstanding leader who impacted the quality of life for many families," Baltimore County Police Chief James W. Johnson said in a statement.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1997
Juvenile offenders who have been ordered to pay restitution may soon get a chance to earn the money to pay back their victims.A program known as Earn-It will provide jobs to nonviolent juveniles, said Harry W. Langmead, the state Department of Juvenile Services' assistant secretary for field services. The program that will be unveiled Oct. 9 to Carroll County business leaders will be a model for the state, he said.The cost in Carroll, to be paid by the juvenile services department, will be about $35,000 annually, he said.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
The Maryland Department of Juvenile Services has asked again to expand the capacity of a privately run residential facility in Carroll County to twice the state's limit, saying there is a backlog of young offenders who are waiting in detention centers instead of getting treatment. The department first broached doubling the capacity of Silver Oak Academy from 48 to 96 beds more than a year ago. It was a departure from the state's long-term plan to create smaller treatment centers for young offenders.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | August 6, 1992
A private corrections company in Maryland will be paid up to $4 million a year to provide innovative treatment and custody for young offenders on a mountaintop near the Pennsylvania state line in northwest Frederick County.Under a five-year contract approved yesterday by the Board of Public Works, Youth Services International Inc. of Owings Mills will try to change the behavior of juvenile offenders with a range of problems, including substance abuse and what the state calls "a lack of response to authority."
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | March 23, 2006
The hip-hop vibe filled the cramped amateur sound studio in the basement of a youth center in West Baltimore. As a teenage boy rapped into a microphone about street life, a sound engineer in the booth next door manipulated the prerecorded beats. "Gimme something positive!" said the 28-year-old engineer, Joshua Wilson, as police, probation officers and teenagers moved their feet or nodded their heads to the beat. "I ain't never write something positive!" the boy yelled back, laughing. It's a moment in the life of a new initiative called the Juvenile Intervention Program, led by the Baltimore Police Department.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2000
A state task force appointed to help fix Maryland's system of supervising juvenile delinquents after they leave institutions started work yesterday with a discussion that veered from academia to the streets. Gov. Parris N. Glendening appointed the 11-member task force after a series in The Sun last month detailed abuses at one of the state's boot camps for delinquents in Western Maryland, and the failure of the state Department of Juvenile Justice to keep track of young offenders once they had graduated from the camp.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Melissa Harris and Julie Bykowicz and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporters | June 16, 2008
Some Baltimore judges and defense attorneys have complained recently that the state Department of Juvenile Services is failing to connect young offenders - even ones who have committed serious crimes - with court-ordered services. At a hearing last week for a boy responsible for second-degree assault, Judge David W. Young said that, too often, the programs promised in court are "pie in the sky" and aren't followed up on by the state agency. "We need to do more than say we make referrals; we need to make referrals," Young said during the Thursday hearing.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
Regarding your recent article about living conditions for juvenile offenders at the Baltimore City Detention Center, these young people were charged as adults because they robbed, raped, murdered or shot someone ("'Nobody belongs in those conditions,'" July 29). Are we supposed to feel sorry for them because they have no air conditioning? Not that long ago these same juveniles were hanging out on the streets in hot and humid weather terrorizing their neighborhoods, but now they can't stand the heat?
NEWS
May 14, 1991
Howard County Del. Robert L. Flanagan mouthed a short-sighted response to the arrest of a juvenile charged with the rape of a jogger during an outing from the Thomas O'Farrell Youth Center when he commented, "That's ridiculous, to be exposing people to that kind of danger." Certainly the public must be protected from dangerous offenders of any age. But as crime rates clearly show, the urge to lock 'em up is just a temporary solution. All too often, inmates serve a few years, only to return to society -- "rehabilitated" or not. Unless it wants to turn large areas into prison camps, this country simply does not have the resources to preserve public safety by relying largely on lock-up responses to crime.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
Regarding your recent article about living conditions for juvenile offenders at the Baltimore City Detention Center, these young people were charged as adults because they robbed, raped, murdered or shot someone ("'Nobody belongs in those conditions,'" July 29). Are we supposed to feel sorry for them because they have no air conditioning? Not that long ago these same juveniles were hanging out on the streets in hot and humid weather terrorizing their neighborhoods, but now they can't stand the heat?
NEWS
June 23, 2010
If 18-year-old Lamont Davis' trial and sentencing on attempted-murder charges are not flashing signs for juvenile justice reform, it is difficult to see what would be. Mr. Davis was convicted of a terrible shooting that badly injured 5-year-old Raven Wyatt. But the two life sentences plus 30 years he received, foreclosing any possible second chance, would shock those who founded the first juvenile courts a century ago. The original juvenile courts, initially established in Chicago in 1899 and later throughout the United States, placed rehabilitation ahead of punishment.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | November 24, 2009
One by one, the dozen teenagers ambled up to the podium Monday, looked nervously around the filled courtroom and cleared their throats. Then, each delivered a brief speech about overcoming challenges and facing controversy, in the 15th annual oratorical contest for youths in the care of the Department of Juvenile Services. "I didn't come here to win first place," said Ricky, as the group waited for results of the judging. "I came here to show appreciation for my dad. ... I love you, Mom and Dad."
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | July 19, 2009
At 17, Lamont Davis has been arrested 15 times since age 10, including charges of drug dealing, carjacking with a handgun and assaults. Yet he's spent just a handful of weeks in juvenile treatment facilities over the years and was sent home in July after admitting to charges in a robbery. Days later, the Baltimore teen was arrested on charges that he critically wounded a 5-year-old girl as he shot at another youth. That Davis now faces more serious criminal charges than ever, city prosecutors and some public officials say, highlights a dangerous problem in the juvenile justice system: Because it emphasizes rehabilitation over punishment, teens who are lightly sanctioned for early offenses sometimes graduate to more violent crimes.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 22, 2009
The five teens, brought from city juvenile detention facilities to participate in a panel discussion yesterday, talked about recognizing the bad choices they had made and how they wanted to better themselves. But asked whether they felt safe in their neighborhoods, their answers showed just how tenuous staying on the right path can be. "For me, safe or not safe, it doesn't matter because things can go bad in a second," said one of the teens, who added that he once made $850 a week on the streets slinging drugs.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2008
A Nevada company that recently purchased the grounds of the Bowling Brook Preparatory School - a Carroll County youth lockup that was shuttered last year after a Baltimore boy died there - has applied for a state license to operate a juvenile program. Rite of Passage has been working for months to open a privately run facility for young offenders - a move that some advocates have said could contradict the state's new approach to treating juvenile delinquents in small residential settings.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2008
A Nevada company that recently purchased the grounds of the Bowling Brook Preparatory School - a Carroll County youth lockup that was shuttered last year after a Baltimore boy died there - has applied for a state license to operate a juvenile program. Rite of Passage has been working for months to open a privately run facility for young offenders - a move that some advocates have said could contradict the state's new approach to treating juvenile delinquents in small residential settings.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Melissa Harris and Julie Bykowicz and Melissa Harris,Sun Reporters | June 16, 2008
Some Baltimore judges and defense attorneys have complained recently that the state Department of Juvenile Services is failing to connect young offenders - even ones who have committed serious crimes - with court-ordered services. At a hearing last week for a boy responsible for second-degree assault, Judge David W. Young said that, too often, the programs promised in court are "pie in the sky" and aren't followed up on by the state agency. "We need to do more than say we make referrals; we need to make referrals," Young said during the Thursday hearing.
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