Advertisement
HomeCollectionsYeltsin
IN THE NEWS

Yeltsin

NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In their third summit together, President Clinton and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin showcased their close personal rapport yesterday but ran smack up against the reality that their interests sometimes still diverge sharply in the post-Cold War world.On some of the most difficult issues facing the two countries -- including Russia's desire to flex its military muscle in the former Soviet republics, the war in Bosnia and Russia's sale of arms to Iran -- warm toasts, handshakes and hugs could not overcome profound policy differences.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Will Englund and By Will Englund,sun foreign staff | March 19, 2000
"Yeltsin: A Revolutionary Life," by Leon Aron. St. Martin's Press. 908 pages. $35. Leon Aron suspects that history will be kind to Russia's first president, and this biography might be thought of as his attempt to steal a march on history. The Boris Yeltsin we read about here is a hero, a builder, the guarantor of Russian democracy -- Aron concludes his densely quote-filled book comparing Yeltsin, favorably, to de Gaulle and Lincoln. It has, in fact, been a while since anyone outside the Kremlin had anything so nice to say about the big snarling construction boss from Sverdlovsk whose epic rise and fall and rise again coincided in a very direct way with the demise of Communism and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 6, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian lawmakers set the stage yesterday for a new confrontation with President Boris N. Yeltsin by voting down his proposed "political truce" and calling the Soviet-era Congress of People's Deputies into session next week to investigate whether he violated the Constitution.The decisions by the Supreme Soviet -- Russia's smaller standing legislature -- capped a week of rising political temperatures, a veiled threat by Mr. Yeltsin to dissolve both lawmaking bodies and rumors of military intervention in an increasingly paralyzed political system.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND and WILL ENGLUND,Will Englund is a Moscow correspondent for The Sun | November 17, 1991
Moscow -- Two presidents: one talented, the other strong; one rational, the other fearless; one seeking personal order, the other seeking personal answers. This is a country with two men at the top, Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin, each a true Russian type, neither complete, each jealous of the other's traits, their lives symmetrical and entwined.Are they unable to do without each other? Are they two parts of a larger whole? Deep down, do they detest each other or admire each other, or has it gone beyond that?
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 21, 1992
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin, who rushed home from China to shore up his control over the formation of a new government, agreed with his new prime minister yesterday that the "core" of the last Cabinet of Westernized, free-market economists would remain in office, a spokesman for Mr. Yeltsin said.After several hours of talks yesterday involving Mr. Yeltsin, Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin and Vladimir Shumeiko, the first deputy prime minister, Mr. Yeltsin's spokesman announced, "The basic current team will be preserved."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 24, 1995
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin, his popularity at an ebb, has launched a pro-government bloc for the December parliamentary elections, and he moved yesterday to change the election law in its favor.After Mr. Yeltsin announced the idea a month ago, 270 Cabinet XTC ministers, regional governors, mayors, bankers, Soviet-era factory directors and others came together to found a movement calling itself "Our Home is Russia," led by Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin.But the movement, which Mr. Yeltsin hopes will offer a firmer foundation for free-market reforms and preserve his options for re-election in 1996, has yet to gain a strong following.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 22, 1993
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin won a major political victory last night, as the Russian Central Bank agreed to stop resisting his free-market economic reforms.According to the Interfax news service, the bank initialed an agreement to phase out credits for ailing industries, reduce tax subsidies and stop propping up the ruble in international currency auctions.The agreement marks the latest and perhaps most significant consequence of Mr. Yeltsin's victory in last month's referendum, in which a majority of Russian voters gave him a vote of confidence and approved his economic policies.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 8, 1994
MOSCOW -- Anatoly Kuntsevich, the retired army general assigned to abolish Russia's chemical and biological warfare programs but lately accused of working to prolong them, was dismissed from his post yesterday.A one-sentence Kremlin announcement said only that President Boris N. Yeltsin fired Mr. Kuntsevich for "numerous and gross violations" of his duties as chairman of Mr. Yeltsin's Committee on Problems of Chemical and Biological Disarmament.Mr. Yeltsin had come under criticism at home and in the West for allowing Mr. Kuntsevich, a soldier-scientist who once ran the Soviet chemical weapons-making complex, to oversee the destruction of his own empire -- tens of thousands of tons of poisonous nerve gas and mustard gas stored at seven heavily guarded sites across Russia.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 14, 1992
MOSCOW -- Prodded by President Boris N. Yeltsin, the Russian Constitutional Court agreed yesterday to hand back Mikhail S. Gorbachev's confiscated passport so that the former Soviet leader may attend a state funeral in Germany.It was the most encouraging sign yet that the two men have reached an understanding breaking the internationally embarrassing deadlock caused by Mr. Gorbachev's refusal to appear in a case involving the Communist Party's past.Court Chairman Valery Zokerin announced that the court's summons to Mr. Gorbachev, Soviet Communist Party general secretary from 1985 to 1991, was still in force.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | December 11, 1992
MOSCOW -- An angry and disdainful Boris N. Yeltsin, raisin the specter of a "creeping coup" against him, said yesterday that he could no longer work with Russia's Communist-dominated Congress and called for a referendum to let the Russian people choose between him and the legislature.Stung by rejection and defeat over the last several days at the hands of his conservative foes in the Congress, the Russian president strode into its Kremlin hall at 10 a.m. yesterday and promptly brought on Russia's most serious political crisis since the failed coup of August 1991.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.