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NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau Staff writer Mark Matthews contributed to this article | January 21, 1994
MOSCOW -- President Boris N. Yeltsin appointed a conservative-dominated Cabinet yesterday, provoking the departure of yet another economic adviser trusted by the West and leading to predictions of economic chaos from advocates of rapid market reforms.The Cabinet formation also generated unhappiness in Washington, where a State Department spokesman said that "the absence [in the government] of those known in the West as proponents of reform is a source of concern."The new Cabinet was a clear victory for Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, a centrist with strong ties to agrarian and industrial interests.
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NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- In their third summit together, President Clinton and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin showcased their close personal rapport yesterday but ran smack up against the reality that their interests sometimes still diverge sharply in the post-Cold War world.On some of the most difficult issues facing the two countries -- including Russia's desire to flex its military muscle in the former Soviet republics, the war in Bosnia and Russia's sale of arms to Iran -- warm toasts, handshakes and hugs could not overcome profound policy differences.
NEWS
By SCOTT SHANE | March 21, 1993
It is an ingrained American habit to interpret Russian politics as a battle between good and evil, and the Communists were the bad guys. When KGB agents hustled Alexander Solzhenitsyn aboard a westbound jet in 1974 or Boris Yeltsin stood atop a tank to face down the putsch in 1991, that simple framework sufficed.In the muddle of post-Soviet Russia, allegiances are more complex. But as President Yeltsin squared off a week ago against the balky Russian Congress of People's Deputies, some American observers seemed determined to squeeze a new reality into old molds.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 8, 1994
MOSCOW -- Anatoly Kuntsevich, the retired army general assigned to abolish Russia's chemical and biological warfare programs but lately accused of working to prolong them, was dismissed from his post yesterday.A one-sentence Kremlin announcement said only that President Boris N. Yeltsin fired Mr. Kuntsevich for "numerous and gross violations" of his duties as chairman of Mr. Yeltsin's Committee on Problems of Chemical and Biological Disarmament.Mr. Yeltsin had come under criticism at home and in the West for allowing Mr. Kuntsevich, a soldier-scientist who once ran the Soviet chemical weapons-making complex, to oversee the destruction of his own empire -- tens of thousands of tons of poisonous nerve gas and mustard gas stored at seven heavily guarded sites across Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Will Englund and By Will Englund,sun foreign staff | March 19, 2000
"Yeltsin: A Revolutionary Life," by Leon Aron. St. Martin's Press. 908 pages. $35. Leon Aron suspects that history will be kind to Russia's first president, and this biography might be thought of as his attempt to steal a march on history. The Boris Yeltsin we read about here is a hero, a builder, the guarantor of Russian democracy -- Aron concludes his densely quote-filled book comparing Yeltsin, favorably, to de Gaulle and Lincoln. It has, in fact, been a while since anyone outside the Kremlin had anything so nice to say about the big snarling construction boss from Sverdlovsk whose epic rise and fall and rise again coincided in a very direct way with the demise of Communism and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
By STEVEN MERRITT MINER | November 22, 1992
During the presidential campaign, American voters seemed united in at least one thing: Foreign affairs were not a central issue. Unfortunately, rapid, destabilizing changes abroad, especially in the successor states of the Soviet empire, do not give us the luxury of adopting "splendid isolation."As Robert Strauss, the U.S. ambassador to Russia, said this month, should democratic governments in Eastern Europe, especially in Russia, fail to sink strong roots, the resulting chaos would soon enough have a drastic domestic impact in the United States.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush told Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin yesterday that he was ready to work with him up to a point but would do nothing to undercut the "closest possible relationship" with Mikhail S. Gorbachev.Mr. Bush devoted an unusual hour and 40 minutes to his meeting with Russia's first popularly elected president, who left citing four economic and commercial areas in which the United States and his republic would work more closely.But the firm White House message was that Mr. Yeltsin should continue his recent cooperation with the Soviet president, a message the Russian leader somewhat grudgingly appeared to accept.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | July 19, 1995
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, short of breath but pointedly standing for a full five-minute television interview, appeared for the first time in public last night since he was hospitalized a week ago.Mr. Yeltsin, 64, told Russian Public Television he'd suffered a heart attack July 11, but, "I'll be in operation soon. The doctors say the recovery will be complete, without any consequences."At least Russians now know that Mr. Yeltsin isn't dead or dying in a hospital bed.But given the Russian reflex for intrigue, the question about Mr. Yeltsin's hospitalization was not simply, "Is he healthy?"
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 6, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian lawmakers set the stage yesterday for a new confrontation with President Boris N. Yeltsin by voting down his proposed "political truce" and calling the Soviet-era Congress of People's Deputies into session next week to investigate whether he violated the Constitution.The decisions by the Supreme Soviet -- Russia's smaller standing legislature -- capped a week of rising political temperatures, a veiled threat by Mr. Yeltsin to dissolve both lawmaking bodies and rumors of military intervention in an increasingly paralyzed political system.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND and WILL ENGLUND,Will Englund is a Moscow correspondent for The Sun | November 17, 1991
Moscow -- Two presidents: one talented, the other strong; one rational, the other fearless; one seeking personal order, the other seeking personal answers. This is a country with two men at the top, Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Boris N. Yeltsin, each a true Russian type, neither complete, each jealous of the other's traits, their lives symmetrical and entwined.Are they unable to do without each other? Are they two parts of a larger whole? Deep down, do they detest each other or admire each other, or has it gone beyond that?
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