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By David Kelly and David Kelly,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 25, 2003
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. - Far below the blue waters of Yellowstone Lake, a mysterious dome 2,100 feet across and 100 feet high is causing concern among scientists and people who don't know whether it's a harmless curiosity or a hazard on the verge of exploding. The dome, also called a bulge or an elevated plain, is less than a mile from shore and was recently explored by researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey, using unmanned submarines and sonar. "It could be the precursor to a hydrothermal explosion," said Lisa Morgan, a geologist leading the team.
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TRAVEL
October 19, 2003
The summertime trip to a national park is an American vacation classic. But natural wonders do not disappear with the crowds. Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming offers a series of educational vacations called "Lodging and Learning" to highlight its year-round attractions. This winter's offerings include "Old Faithful Winter Adventure," which includes a ski tour to Lone Star Geyser, wildlife watching, and a trip to the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River in a "snowcoach" -- a van-sized vehicle that can traverse the park's snowy roads.
NEWS
August 4, 2003
AMERICANS WHO visit the country's nearly 400 national parks this summer may find these treasured landscapes under siege. Vistas clouded by pollution. Visitors centers in disrepair and poorly staffed. Advancing columns of newly built homes invading historic battlefields, robbing succeeding generations of the chance to see them as the soldiers did. The eloquent silence of the Grand Canyon disturbed by the buzz of fly-over tours, while the peace is violated by water scooters at Texas' San Padre Island and in winter months by snowmobiles at Yellowstone, the granddaddy of all national parks.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2003
Environmentalists were disappointed when the Bush administration lifted a pending ban on snowmobiles in Yellowstone National Park. Now, it's the snowmobilers' turn to be unhappy. When the telephone reservation system opens tomorrow to begin booking visits under new rules, vacationers will discover there's a limit to their fun. For the first time, they'll have to pay a nonrefundable $10 fee if they want to ride the roads to Old Faithful and the bubbling thermal springs. In most cases, they'll be required to hire a licensed guide.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 21, 2003
Snowmobiles will be allowed in Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park under a compromise announced yesterday that satisfies the builders and users of the machines but guarantees challenges from the environmental community and members of Congress. The proposal, which is expected to be signed March 24, reverses a decision by the Clinton administration that would have banned snowmobiles from the parks by next winter. The park service now plans to cap the number of machines allowed in Yellowstone daily at 950 and limit Grand Teton to 150. Yellowstone now averages 840 snowmobiles daily, but on holidays such as Presidents Day weekend, the total can soar to nearly 1,700.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 16, 2003
WEST YELLOWSTONE, Mont. - There are days, more than Kitty Eneboe cares to count, when being a ranger at the nation's oldest national park is more like being part of a NASCAR pit crew. Hundreds of snowmobiles roar up to her entrance station at Yellowstone National Park and turn crisp evergreen-scented winter air into a malodorous blue-tinged haze capable of inducing headaches and watery eyes. On those days, Eneboe checks park passes from behind the glass of her kiosk as a blower forces clean air inside.
NEWS
By Usha Lee McFarling and Usha Lee McFarling,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 2001
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK - When the volcano here blew, it obliterated a mountain range, felled herds of prehistoric camels hundreds of miles away and left a smoking hole in the ground the size of the Los Angeles Basin. Modern Yellowstone doesn't dwell on its cataclysmic past or its potential for another monster eruption. Rangers tell people to keep their distance from bison and steaming geysers. But there are no signs, aside from nature's bubbling mud pots and geysers, that visitors are wandering through the caldera of one of the largest active volcanoes in the world.
NEWS
February 8, 2001
THE ROAR is so loud that it drowns out the sound of Old Faithful. The air is more polluted than in downtown Los Angeles. That is winter in Yellowstone National Park under the onslaught of snowmobiles. To protect the environment, wildlife and quality of visits, the National Park Service is moving to ban snowmobiles at Yellowstone and two dozen other parks. That effort must not be stayed. The phase-out of snowmobiles reflects long overdue enforcement of an executive order of the Nixon administration, 10 years of environmental study and three years of public hearings and comment.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN OUTDOORS WRITER | January 28, 2001
ELK COUNTY, Pa. - In open fields and on wooded hillsides they forage, more than 600 strong. Their antlers look like extensions of the tree limbs around them. When they snort, foggy plumes billow above their heads. Descendants of the great herds in Yellowstone and South Dakota, the Pennsylvania elk have become a tourist attraction, capable of causing a back-road traffic jam just as quickly as a fender-bender on a freeway. Towns in this area have taken advantage of the transplanted herd.
NEWS
May 21, 2000
A TEASPOON of hot water may not seem valuable, but taken from the geysers of Yellowstone National Park the sulfurous broth may yield new generations of wonder drugs or industrial chemicals. Or perhaps the key to DNA fingerprinting, as did an enzyme isolated from the park's hot springs bacteria three decades ago that was patented and yields $100 million a year to a private chemical firm. Or similar extracted microbes that are used in stain removers and detergents. These treasures of bioprospecting, extracting commercially useful chemical compounds from unique microorganisms found in nature, are at the heart of a bubbling legal controversy.
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