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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
The Tipsy? Taxi! service from Yellow Cab, which offers free cab rides on several holidays throughout the year, is returning to Baltimore on New Year's Eve. It'll be the fourth year in a row the service, which has been criticized for being sluggish and dropping calls, will be offered in the city. On the 31st,  the Charm City Circulator with also have extended hours. Tipsy? Taxi!, sponsored by Yellow Cab, AAA Mid-Atlantic, and this year, the Motor Vehicle Administration, aims to keep drunk drivers off the road on drinking holidays.
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NEWS
April 29, 2014
On a brutally cold January day I waited for a Yellow cab to take my mom to chemotherapy. I had booked the cab the night before on the Yellow cab website. It never showed. Neither did the second cab the dispatcher sent. The next time I used Uber. It worked perfectly, and I have never looked back ( "Make room for ride-sharing," April 28). Uber is popular for one reason: It works and the cab companies don't. Uber provides accountability. You rate the Uber driver on your smartphone by awarding stars.
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BUSINESS
By - Liz F. Kay Liz F. Kay | October 23, 2009
Yellow Cab of Baltimore celebrated its 100th anniversary Thursday with a downtown parade of taxis, including vintage cabs and even the most modern addition, hybrid vehicles. W.W. Cloud purchased the Brown and Blue Cab companies in 1909 and renamed them Yellow, making it the oldest registered Yellow Cab in the country, according to company officials. The cars, however, were black. Yellow grew and expanded until 2001, when Yellow Transportation of Baltimore was acquired by a global transportation company now known as Veolia Transportation.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
The apparent decision by a state administrative law judge to declare Uber a "common carrier" once again illustrates that Maryland is trapped in the past by special interest lobbyists ( "Rules loom for car service," April 25). As the Sun reporters point out, the state legislature was asked this year to enact legislation that would have required Uber to provide a certain amount of ride-share insurance and would have enabled Uber to continue calling itself a smartphone app (which it actually is)
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Yellow Cab, which has operated in the Baltimore area since 1909, has been named taxi operator of the year by the industry's trade group, the Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association. Behind the wheel is Mark Joseph, a graduate of American University in Washington, who began his career at Yellow Cab in 1976 and was president and CEO for 20 years. When Connex North America acquired Yellow Transportation in 2001, Joseph rose through the executive ranks to become president and chief operating officer of Connex, now Veolia Transportation, and vice chairman and CEO of Veolia.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | January 3, 2007
George Jay Joseph, who owned and rebuilt Baltimore's Yellow Cab Co. into the region's largest passenger ground transportation business, died of cancer Monday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. The Chevy Chase resident was 87. Born in Bethlehem, Pa., he was the son of a Lithuanian immigrant peddler who went on to found a department store in Reading, Pa. He earned a bachelor's degree at Pennsylvania State University and a law degree from the University of Virginia after Army service during World War II. Mr. Joseph went into the legal publishing business in downtown Washington in the 1950s and named his first two companies, Jefferson Law Book and Thomas Jefferson Publishing, in honor of the president who established the University of Virginia.
BUSINESS
By Colin Campbell and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A judge with the Maryland Public Service Commission proposed Thursday to categorize Uber and other popular rideshare companies as "common carriers" — and subject them to the same regulations as taxis. Uber has threatened to leave the state if the commission votes next month to classify as a cab company. That would be a victory for traditional cab companies, who have argued that Uber, a smartphone app that connects passengers with drivers, enjoys an unfair advantage. Judge Terry J. Romine wrote that Uber is a "public service company" because it offers rides for hire — and so should be subject to the jurisdiction of the commission.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
The state Public Service Commission Wednesday denied a request from the owners of century-old Yellow Cab of Baltimore to prohibit Uber Technologies Inc. from operating a luxury town car service that can be hired by smartphone. Yellow Cab officials believe the San Francisco-based company that launched service in the city and Baltimore County late last month has an unfair competitive advantage because the startup does not comply with safety and insurance regulations. But Uber contends that it is a technology company with an app that allows independent drivers and upscale customers to do business on their own. The commission staff recommended that Yellow Cab's request be denied because at the time of its review, Uber had not begun operations.
NEWS
April 29, 2014
On a brutally cold January day I waited for a Yellow cab to take my mom to chemotherapy. I had booked the cab the night before on the Yellow cab website. It never showed. Neither did the second cab the dispatcher sent. The next time I used Uber. It worked perfectly, and I have never looked back ( "Make room for ride-sharing," April 28). Uber is popular for one reason: It works and the cab companies don't. Uber provides accountability. You rate the Uber driver on your smartphone by awarding stars.
NEWS
May 12, 2006
RICHARD C. WOLFE, of Baltimore, died April 27, 2006 of heart failure at age 63. He was a graduate of Franklin and Marshall College and received an MA in English Literature from Kent State University. Early in his career he was an instructor of English at Towson State University. At the time of his death, he was employed by the Yellow Cab Company. He leaves a daughter, Pamela Goodrum, in California, a son, Erik Wolfe, in Georgia, and a brother, Paul Wolfe, in New Hampshire. No funeral service is planned.
BUSINESS
By Colin Campbell and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A judge with the Maryland Public Service Commission proposed Thursday to categorize Uber and other popular rideshare companies as "common carriers" — and subject them to the same regulations as taxis. Uber has threatened to leave the state if the commission votes next month to classify as a cab company. That would be a victory for traditional cab companies, who have argued that Uber, a smartphone app that connects passengers with drivers, enjoys an unfair advantage. Judge Terry J. Romine wrote that Uber is a "public service company" because it offers rides for hire — and so should be subject to the jurisdiction of the commission.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Baltimore's oldest cab company and the Maryland Transit Administration are updating their fleets for wheelchair-using customers, replacing small buses and minivans with an SUV-like vehicle that provides a smoother, more civilized ride. The MV-1 is designed specifically to transport disabled passengers and already is in use in cities such as Pittsburgh, Chicago and Dallas. Built in Indiana, it is the only production vehicle that meets Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines. Yellow Cab and sister company 1010 Sedan purchased 10 MV-1s and began using them this week.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2013
The state Public Service Commission Wednesday denied a request from the owners of century-old Yellow Cab of Baltimore to prohibit Uber Technologies Inc. from operating a luxury town car service that can be hired by smartphone. Yellow Cab officials believe the San Francisco-based company that launched service in the city and Baltimore County late last month has an unfair competitive advantage because the startup does not comply with safety and insurance regulations. But Uber contends that it is a technology company with an app that allows independent drivers and upscale customers to do business on their own. The commission staff recommended that Yellow Cab's request be denied because at the time of its review, Uber had not begun operations.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
Yellow Cab, which has operated in the Baltimore area since 1909, has been named taxi operator of the year by the industry's trade group, the Taxicab, Limousine & Paratransit Association. Behind the wheel is Mark Joseph, a graduate of American University in Washington, who began his career at Yellow Cab in 1976 and was president and CEO for 20 years. When Connex North America acquired Yellow Transportation in 2001, Joseph rose through the executive ranks to become president and chief operating officer of Connex, now Veolia Transportation, and vice chairman and CEO of Veolia.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
One too many margaritas isn't hard to manage during Cinco de Mayo. So a number of organizations have teamed up to make sure no one in Baltimore gets behind the wheel with tequila breath that would break a breathalyzer. AAA Mid-Atlantic, the Maryland Department of Transportation and Yellow Cab created "Tipsy? Taxi!" to offer drunken revelers a way to get home without driving. From 4 p.m. Saturday to 4 a.m. Sunday, anyone that calls a certain number to order a cab gets the ride free.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
The Tipsy? Taxi! service from Yellow Cab, which offers free cab rides on several holidays throughout the year, is returning to Baltimore on New Year's Eve. It'll be the fourth year in a row the service, which has been criticized for being sluggish and dropping calls, will be offered in the city. On the 31st,  the Charm City Circulator with also have extended hours. Tipsy? Taxi!, sponsored by Yellow Cab, AAA Mid-Atlantic, and this year, the Motor Vehicle Administration, aims to keep drunk drivers off the road on drinking holidays.
NEWS
October 23, 1993
George Edward BondDrove for Yellow Cab Co.George Edward Bond, who retired from the Yellow Cab Co. after 50 years of service, died Oct. 14 of heart and respiratory failure as a result of complications of a stroke he suffered on July 29 at the Lorien Nursing Home in Columbia. He moved to the nursing home in 1993.The 87-year-old former East Baltimore resident moved to Columbia in 1989 to live with a daughter. He was a Yellow Cab driver until 1975, when he became a Yellow Cab owner. He retired in 1982.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2011
Baltimore's election judges will be ferried to the polls by Yellow Cabs this fall, under an up-to-$30,000 deal approved by the city's Board of Estimates Thursday. The contract was not competitively bid, but awarded to Yellow Cab because it is the "only known vendor that has the proven resources" to deliver the judges, according to the board's agenda. Baltimore City Elections Board Chair Armstead B.C. Jones Sr. said that the cabs would wait outside board of elections offices near City Hall to take substitute judges to the polls during the September primary and November general election.
BUSINESS
By - Liz F. Kay Liz F. Kay | October 23, 2009
Yellow Cab of Baltimore celebrated its 100th anniversary Thursday with a downtown parade of taxis, including vintage cabs and even the most modern addition, hybrid vehicles. W.W. Cloud purchased the Brown and Blue Cab companies in 1909 and renamed them Yellow, making it the oldest registered Yellow Cab in the country, according to company officials. The cars, however, were black. Yellow grew and expanded until 2001, when Yellow Transportation of Baltimore was acquired by a global transportation company now known as Veolia Transportation.
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