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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | May 2, 1991
Annapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins said yesterday that he wants to take a bite out of crime, not his constituents' wallets.Hopkins presented the City Council with a bare-bones $36.8 million operating budget for the next fiscal year, which begins July 1, that would not increase the city's property tax rate but would raise fees and put a freeze on city employees' cost-of-living raises.The spending plan -- a 3.4 percent increase over last year's budget -- includes 11 new police officers and emergency dispatchers, as well as 10 patrol cars.
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NEWS
April 5, 2010
The biggest item on the to-do list for the Maryland General Assembly in its final week is deciding on cuts to Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget proposal, and there are relatively few differences between the plans approved by the Senate and the House of Delegates. Each would shave about $125 million from the governor's $32 billion plan, significantly less than the $660 million the legislature cut last year or the $441 million it cut the year before. Whatever decisions the House and Senate make, this year's budget will be noteworthy as the first in recent history to be smaller than the budget from the previous year.
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NEWS
December 8, 1991
When County Executive Charles I. Ecker starts work on his second budget with a public hearing Wednesday, he is expected to tell people the county's economic woes will not end soon.The county will have to endure "a very restrained budget at least one more year," said county budget director Raymond S. Wacks. "We had said last year that we hoped the situation would improve and that the constraints would be temporary. Now we will be telling people to tighten their belts anotheryear or two."Ecker will set the tone for Wednesday's hearing with a short "reality presentation" outlining the county's dire financial outlook, Wacks said.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Even as the fiscal picture in Maryland brightens, Gov. Martin O'Malley called on the federal government Wednesday to provide more help to states that are laboring to keep their budgets balanced. The governor's plea came as state analysts announced that Maryland's revenue projections have fallen $77 million more for the current fiscal year and the next. While that means O'Malley will have less money for next year's budget, which he will present to the General Assembly in January, the decline was far less precipitous than previous Maryland revenue adjustments during the recession.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr | January 24, 1992
Baltimore School Superintendent Walter G. Amprey proposed a $581.5 million budget last night for the fiscal year beginning July 1 that calls for spending $223 more per student.The proposal amounts to an increase of $37.1 million -- or 6.8 percent -- over this year's budget.It allows for staffing of kindergarten programs that were mandated by the General Assembly last year.The programs are to begin in September.While the superintendent's new budget does not include layoffs, it lops more than $1.6 million off administrative costs by reducing central office staff to the "right size," Mr. Amprey said.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
Republican lawmakers said yesterday that $82 million in surplus state money is "sloshing around" in state agencies, an amount that could be put toward next year's budget instead of proceeds from the keno electronic lottery game."
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
Harford County ended fiscal 1994 on June 30 with a surplus of more than $18 million, according to an independent audit released last week.County Treasurer James Jewell said the surplus included $8.634 million in unappropriated funds, a 5 percent account that is held aside from year to year as a savings account for emergencies.Another $8.78 million was appropriated but unspent money that was rolled into the fiscal 1995 operating budget for use after July 1.Year-end bills not paid until fiscal '95 accounted for the remaining $666,000 in surplus.
NEWS
By KAREN HOSLER | February 12, 1995
Washington -- Deficit hawks, those tight-fisted scolds who thought this year offered the best chance they'd ever seen for bringing the federal budget into balance, are starting to lose hope.The Republican-led drive to cut spending dramatically in order to wipe out the deficit by 2002 suffered a big setback last week when President Clinton signaled through his 1996 budget proposal that the GOP is on its own.Not surprisingly, the president, who made major progress on the deficit during his first two years in office, only to be pounded by the Republicans and repudiated by the voters in the mid-term elections, decided to let the new congressional majority absorb this round of budget-cutting pain.
NEWS
January 18, 1996
WHEN THE dust finally settles after the forthcoming battle over Carroll County's education budget, none of the participants -- from the commissioners to students -- will emerge unscathed. However, the Board of Education and the commissioners must fashion a spending plan that does the least amount of damage to the young people it is designed to serve.The school board has proposed a total budget of $143,449,246 -- an increase of about $9 million from this year's budget. The county will be responsible for providing about $81.8 million of the total.
NEWS
January 28, 2001
NOW MARYLAND'S 188 state lawmakers can get to work. They've heard the governor list his priorities in the State of the State address and they have glanced at the 1,000-plus pages of budget detail describing how he wants to spend $21 billion of taxpayer money. One thing is clear: Lawmakers and the governor don't see eye to eye on this year's budget. Gov. Parris N. Glendening's blueprint is $209 million higher than the General Assembly's spending cap, yet budget analysts say it fails to include $350 million in ongoing state government expenses.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper , julie.scharper@baltsun.com | December 14, 2009
Baltimore residents know they can phone the city's 311 call center to request alley cleanings, complain about noisy neighbors or inquire about a missed trash pickup. But what they might not know is that the employees who answer the telephone are garbed in matching attire paid for by taxpayers. Last week, the city's Board of Estimates, its spending board, approved $24,000 to buy new uniforms for call center employees. The money will pay for polo shirts, slacks and sweaters or hooded sweat shirts for about 80 workers, officials said.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | December 2, 2009
Baltimore must carve $130 million from its already stripped-down spending plan to account for plummeting revenue and mushrooming pension costs next year, according to projections released Tuesday afternoon. The grim figures indicate the city, still reeling from sweeping cuts earlier this year, must dig even deeper to balance next year's budget. "It's almost immoral the way the budget is shaping up," Deputy Mayor Christopher Thomaskutty said. "At the end of the day, there's going to be significant service impacts if we don't see some changes."
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | July 11, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley said Friday he plans to propose as much as $700 million in budget cuts for the fiscal year that began just 10 days ago, as income tax receipts are projected to be lower than expected. At an appearance in Baltimore, O'Malley said his Cabinet and senior advisers have been working on a list of budget cuts that he hopes to present July 22 to the Board of Public Works for approval. His remarks about cutbacks in a $14 billion budget came after the state legislature's chief budget analyst warned of a widening shortfall.
NEWS
April 14, 2009
The $13.8 billion state operating budget enacted Tuesday by the General Assembly is not a pretty thing. Shortchanged local governments can't be happy with it. Same with state employees who are going without steps or merit pay and agency heads who must do more with less. But it could have been far worse, and given the economic realities of the times, it's probably about right. Let that stand as no more than a qualified endorsement. Had President Barack Obama and Congress not provided $2.5 billion in stimulus money this year, the outcome would have been disastrous.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Gadi Dechter and Laura Smitherman and Gadi Dechter and,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com and gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | October 15, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley will present about $300 million in state budget cuts today to the Board of Public Works, as fiscal analysts warned that the state's financial outlook is rapidly deteriorating. The board, made up of the Democratic governor, Comptroller Peter Franchot and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp, is expected to approve the budget-balancing plan, which also includes transfers from other accounts to create a $150 million cushion in the $14 billion operating budget. "It's going to cause some pain and discomfort all around.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 23, 2007
When Gov. Martin O'Malley began discussing the state budget deficit with a group of businessmen at a Frederick County Chamber of Commerce luncheon last week, he pitched his administration's frugality as the first step in putting Maryland's fiscal house in order. "We are going to solve it in a number of ways, and in fact, we have already begun," the first-year Democrat told the crowd. "The budget that we introduced and that the General Assembly passed almost unanimously was a budget wherein the size of your state government, spending-wise anyway, grew by only 2.7 percent, compared to 12.5 percent growth the year before.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2002
The Howard County Board of Education approved yesterday an operating budget for the coming school year that includes no allowance for anticipated salary increases for teachers and other system employees but still is $20 million larger than this year's budget. Last month, Superintendent John R. O'Rourke requested $389.6 million to run the schools next year, excluding possible salary increases. He called the figure conservative, despite the 5.6 percent increase from the current year's spending levels.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Howard Libit and David Nitkin and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 26, 2002
Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend plans to release a detailed proposal for plugging the state's widening budget gap today, a plan she says can be accomplished largely without new taxes but not without pain. Townsend said yesterday that she has drafted a list of cuts for the $21.7 billion budget, which took effect in July. Most are one-time trims, she said, but a substantial amount are reductions in continuing operations, which would produce savings in future years. She said she has another list of cuts for the first budget that would be prepared by the next governor and become effective July 1. Townsend said she has developed a list of more than $1 billion in new revenue for the 2004 budget year and is pledging to not raise taxes if elected governor - with the possible exception of a tobacco tax increase.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | April 10, 2007
A state takeover and a freeze on city funds were among the sanctions proposed yesterday as elected officials at City Hall and the State House reacted to the disclosure that the Baltimore school system's $1.2 billion budget is riddled with errors. On the final day of the General Assembly session, lawmakers summoned school officials to Annapolis to question them about a Sun article reporting tens of millions of dollars in discrepancies in the budget the school board approved March 27. In dozens of cases in the budget for the next school year, as well as in the budget for the current academic year, the amount listed for salaries does not match the number of people who are supposed to be paid.
NEWS
March 28, 2007
In an editorial yesterday, a reference to $6.1 billion in next year's budget should have included all education spending, not only for the No Child Left Behind law.
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