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By Fawaz A. Gerges and Fawaz A. Gerges,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 2003
FAR FROM achieving security for Israel's citizens, its decision to "remove" Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat at a time of its choosing threatens to plunge Palestinians and Israelis into an all-out war resulting in more bloodshed and suffering. Chaos, not order, will likely prevail. If and when Israel moves against Mr. Arafat, it will deepen the sense of victimization and powerlessness among Palestinians and radicalize and militarize their society further. Despite his dismal record domestically, Mr. Arafat "embodies Palestinian identity and aspirations."
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NEWS
September 5, 2003
AFTER 100 DAYS in office, Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas put it plainly yesterday to the Palestinian parliament: Give him the authority and support to rule or give him his leave. Its response should be swift and straightforward: Grant him the power and tools to govern and be done with it. It is Mr. Abbas who will either succeed or fail in efforts to reach a political settlement with Israel and end the cycle of violence and retribution that has killed more than 2,100 Palestinians and 800 Israelis over three years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 2003
JERUSALEM - Regretting that Israel had not already done so, Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz said yesterday that it might move to expel Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat by the end of the year. "Arafat never wanted to reach an agreement with us, and all he wants is to continue the conflict and bleed the citizens of Israel," Mofaz told Israel's Army Radio. "I believe that he has to disappear from the stage of history." "The state of Israel made a historic mistake by not expelling him some two years ago, and we had more than a few opportunities to do this," Mofaz said.
NEWS
By Mohamad Bazzi and Mohamad Bazzi,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2003
AQABA, Jordan - One morning in January 1965, Yasser Arafat appeared at the offices of Beirut's major newspapers with a leaflet called "Military Communique Number 1." The news release made a surprising claim: that Palestinian guerrillas from a previously unknown group called Fatah had attacked Israel's water system. Arafat, then 35, had a stubble beard, and he was wearing what would become his trademark baggy fatigues and checkered headscarf, or keffiyeh. Few of the editors took him seriously, and no one printed his statement.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 25, 2003
KFAR SABA, Israel - Hours after a Palestinian prime minister who says he is determined to end violence formed his first Cabinet, a Palestinian suicide bomber blew himself up at a train station here yesterday, killing himself and an Israeli security guard. It was a small-scale attack by Israeli standards and was unlikely to prompt a severe retaliatory strike by the army. But it sent a powerful message to both sides that one teen-ager with a bomb hidden under an overcoat can still dictate the agenda.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 9, 2003
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat yesterday nominated a widely respected political moderate to serve as his government's first prime minister, which he said proves that he is serious about instituting reforms. Arafat named Mahmoud Abbas, widely known by his nom de guerre Abu Mazen, during a speech to the Palestine Liberation Organization's 122-member central council, which endorsed the selection. Arafat said it represents "comprehensive reform in all aspects" and answers demands made by critics, including Israel and the United States.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 16, 2002
JERUSALEM - Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat sought to unequivocally distance himself from the terror network al-Qaida in an interview published yesterday, warning Osama bin Laden to stop justifying attacks in the name of Palestinians. "I'm telling him directly not to hide behind the Palestinian cause," Arafat was quoted as saying in The Sunday Times of London, referring to recent statements by al-Qaida leaders. "Why is bin Laden talking about Palestine now?" Arafat said in the article.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 28, 2002
JERUSALEM - This is what the Israeli-Palestinian peace process looks like today: Two men, one of them the speaker of Israel's parliament, the other the speaker of the Palestinian legislative council, sit at a table in a hotel and talk about the importance of their talking to each other more often. Yesterday's unexpected meeting between Israel's Avraham Burg and the Palestinian Authority's Ahmed Qurei, who is better known as Abu Ala, involved little beyond a handshake and an exchange of pleasantries.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 30, 2002
RAMALLAH, West Bank - Bowing to pressure from the United States, the Israeli army pulled out of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's compound yesterday and ended a 10-day siege that left the complex nearly destroyed. The last tank turned its turret away from Arafat's office and rumbled away about 2 p.m., kicking up a cloud of dust in its wake. Dozens of Palestinians raced behind it, fought through a small opening in a 6-foot-high coil of barbed wire and rushed to the one building still intact.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 23, 2002
RAMALLAH, West Bank - The Israeli army abruptly stopped its assault on Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's compound yesterday after the White House said the siege would not curb terrorism. Shortly before dusk, giant bulldozers and other heavy equipment rumbled out of the once-sprawling complex, leaving just a few buildings and stories-tall piles of smoldering rubble. Arafat and up to 250 people have been confined since the Israeli army stormed the Mukata compound Thursday night in retaliation for Palestinian suicide bombings that killed seven people last week.
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