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NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | July 16, 2006
The self-proclaimed oldest regatta on the Chesapeake Bay will, for the first time this year, include a new competitive class for Maryland Special Olympic athletes. Any Governor's Cup Yacht Race skipper who brings on board one intellectually disabled athlete (along with his or her nondisabled partner) will qualify to compete in the new class, or division, during the overnight race from Annapolis to St. Mary's College. The regatta begins Aug. 4. "We're always looking for opportunities to develop the Governor's Cup and make it something that is an interesting event beyond just the race itself," said Torre Meringolo, vice president for development at the college.
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NEWS
By NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON AND LAURA CADIZ and NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON AND LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTERS | June 12, 2006
Publisher Philip Merrill, a philanthropist and former diplomat, was missing and feared dead yesterday, a day after disappearing from his yacht during a windy solo sailing excursion on the Chesapeake Bay. Merrill, chairman of Capital-Gazette Newspapers and donor of millions of dollars for causes including the Chesapeake Bay and the University of Maryland's journalism school, left the dock of his Arnold home on the Severn River about 2 p.m. Saturday, and...
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | May 8, 2006
After nearly three weeks of being bottled up in the Chesapeake Bay, the seven yachts of the Volvo Ocean Race headed back to the open sea yesterday on the strength of building breezes and a send-off party of several thousand spectator boats. Under a milky blue sky, the boats raced from the starting line at Thomas Point Light off Anne Arundel County northward toward the Bay Bridge - where the old eastbound span had been given over to pedestrians and thousands more people took advantage of its distant view of the racers.
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2006
Shhhhhhhhhh, coaxes the teacher in her calming, whispery, indoor voice: Be sensible. "Who's sensible?" she continues, her eyes skipping from child to child sitting and squirming before her on a mat - each trying to out-sensible the next. "Kacey's sensible? Who else? Cameron?" Only the most sensible of children, it seems, will be allowed to venture from their classroom on the ground floor of the Maryland Science Center out into the world of buttons, gadgets and playful wonder existing just beyond.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2006
The Baltimore Waterfront Festival was in its opening moments yesterday when an improbable duo decided to add a bolt of energy. She was older, on the short side and a skilled performer. He was barely out of his teens, taller and a dancer whose best moves could be politely described as unorthodox. But together in front of hundreds of people with a high school band as background, the two effectively got the party -- and the four-day festival featuring the Volvo Ocean Race -- started. "I'm here to enjoy life and the boats," said Carole Weinberg, a 65-year-old ballroom dance coach from Randallstown who punctuated her impromptu routine with a headstand.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON AND ANNIE LINSKEY and CANDUS THOMSON AND ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTERS | April 24, 2006
If poking a hole in the bottom of a boat is asking for trouble, organizers of the Volvo Ocean Race sent trouble an engraved invitation when they were planning the 2005-2006 event. At the bottom of each of the sleek 70-foot racing machines is a rectangular hole about 7 feet by 6 feet. Big enough to accommodate a 15-foot keel, which balances out the tremendous above-deck forces pushing on the massive sails. And big enough to let in a boatload of sea water, which has happened frequently on this around-the-world race.
NEWS
By DOUG KAPUSTIN and DOUG KAPUSTIN,SUN REPORTER | April 23, 2006
With the Volvo Ocean Race yachts in town for a few weeks, we photographers are expecting to see quite a few photo assignments related to the event. On Wednesday, reporter Annie Linskey filed an assignment to photograph one of the support people traveling with the Spanish vessel Movistar, one of the racing boats being overhauled at the Port Covington Marine Center. The center, which is headquarters for the yachts during their stopover in Baltimore, is open to the public. While making a portrait of the Movistar's logistics manager, Eleanor Mordaunt, I couldn't help being distracted by another of the massive vessels, the Dutch yacht ABN Amro One. The boat was on a lift 15 feet in the air, being cleaned by a crew on scissor-lifts using pressure washers.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY AND CANDUS THOMSON and ANNIE LINSKEY AND CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTERS | April 17, 2006
With white water crashing over their 70-foot yachts, Volvo Ocean Race sailors are closing in on Baltimore. The first of the six sailboats is expected as early as today. While the yachts are docked for three weeks in Maryland, race organizers expect a half-million tourists to see the boats and pour $50 million into the economy. "We have a U.S. boat in the race. We're hoping for two nice sunny weekends," said Lee Tawney, the secretary of Ocean Race Chesapeake, the group hosting the boats here.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Before the boats head to the Inner Harbor docks for the Waterfront Festival, before they let the public tour their cabins, they must complete the fifth leg of the Volvo Ocean Race. Six 70-foot yachts set out from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, this month for this part of the 32,700-mile trip. They will arrive this week and stay for open tours before, during and after the festival, which runs April 27-30. Then, they sail to Annapolis for the Maryland Maritime Heritage Festival and resume the race May 7. The race ends in Gothenburg, Sweden, in June.
FEATURES
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | March 22, 2006
Scott Greatorex cannot wait to sail the Chesapeake Bay in his new 25-foot luxury yacht with gorgeous teak paneling, two cabins, a galley, a flat-screen TV and enough nautical gadgets to man the vessel alone if he so desired. He can already picture overnight stays and strolls with his family along Main Street stores this spring since the Wind Orchid also happens to be docked on an enviable piece of real estate on Spa Creek near the heart of historic Annapolis. To do it on his own, it would cost $180,000 just to buy the same Catalina sailboat, plus thousands more in maintenance, slip fees, insurance and other costs -- making such a luxurious hobby far out of reach for a 49-year-old manager at NASA.
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