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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A majority of the editorial staff at WYPR has asked management of the NPR affiliate in Baltimore to recognize their representation by SAG-AFTRA, a national union of public-media professionals. The staff, which includes producers, reporters and on-air hosts, took the first steps on June 3 to form a union, according to a statement issued by SAG-AFTRA Friday afternoon. Leslie Simmons at the national SAG-AFTRA office declined to answer questions that went beyond the statement. Attempts to reach WYPR management were unsuccessful.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
A majority of the editorial staff at WYPR has asked management of the NPR affiliate in Baltimore to recognize their representation by SAG-AFTRA, a national union of public-media professionals. The staff, which includes producers, reporters and on-air hosts, took the first steps on June 3 to form a union, according to a statement issued by SAG-AFTRA Friday afternoon. Leslie Simmons at the national SAG-AFTRA office declined to answer questions that went beyond the statement. Attempts to reach WYPR management were unsuccessful.
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BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | August 1, 2007
Baltimore's largest National Public Radio affiliate, WYPR, 88.1 FM, has struck a deal to buy Ocean City's WRXS, 106.9 FM, which currently has a top-40 hits format. The purchase will give WYPR a presence along most of the Eastern Shore, including Rehoboth and Bethany Beach, Del., and Salisbury, Andrew Bienstock, WYPR's program director, said yesterday. The deal follows WYPR's acquisition in 2004 of Frederick-based religious broadcaster WJTM, which became a WYPR relay station under new call letters, WYPF.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
You cannot understand American humor in the second half of the 20th Century without appreciating the crazed genius of Mel Brooks. And "American Masters" does an all-out appreciation at 9 p.m. Monday (May 20) on PBS. Here's a podcast of my preview from WYPR (88.1).   #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; } #sigtooltip { padding: 5px; border-radius: 5px; -moz-border-radius: 5px; -webkit-border-radius: 5px; }
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Sunni Khalid, managing news editor at WYPR-FM, has been dropped by the public radio station after more than nine years on the job there. His departure from WYPR was confirmed in an email by a newsroom staffer sent to colleagues at the station and elsewhere Monday. His last day was Friday. Khalid and WYPR management both declined comment Wednesday. Khalid, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, had been on probation in February for comments he posted on the Facebook page of a friend questioning the influence of Israel on American politics.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,sun reporter | May 10, 2008
Months of tumult at public radio station WYPR, beginning with the Feb. 1 firing of veteran talk-show host Marc Steiner, have not led to a decline in its audience. In fact, the number of people listening to the station in the first three months of year has increased over the same period last year, from 153,600 to 166,800, ratings from Columbia-based Arbitron Inc. show. But they also show the station has lost a significant portion of its younger listeners. In the noon-2 p.m. time slot, where Sun columnist Dan Rodricks took over for Steiner beginning Feb. 25, the weekly average of listeners ages 25 to 54 declined 44 percent, from 25,300 to 14,100.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | June 11, 2003
As WYPR-FM wraps up its first full year on its own this month, there are many accomplishments to cheer. The Baltimore NPR affiliate's local news desk is up and running, filing several original dispatches each week. Two new programs on classical music feature the performers and concerts of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The station's membership levels have risen. So, too, have contributions and revenues from corporate and foundation sponsors. The new shows have inspired some added gifts and grants, says Anthony Brandon, the station's general manager: "We find these programs create revenues for the station and benefits for the listeners."
FEATURES
By Scott Calvert and Chris Kaltenbach and Scott Calvert and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporters | February 5, 2008
Day 1 of life on air without Marc Steiner at WYPR saw picketing by a group of loyal listeners outside the station's Charles Street studios and strong criticism from members of the station's own community advisory board. "I think it would have been great if they had gotten our opinion," said board member Larry Kloze, a retired antiques dealer, who wasn't told of Friday's firing until yesterday morning, via e-mail. "Maybe they would have changed their mind." Outside the studio, 13 people waved signs demanding Steiner's reinstatement.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | February 12, 2008
Baltimore public radio station WYPR-FM has canceled its scheduled pledge drive this month, more than a week after its decision to fire veteran talk-show host Marc Steiner drew anger from fans of the show. Andy Bienstock, station vice president and program director, said yesterday the station will hold a combined winter and spring 2008 fund drive in April. Station management didn't want to hold a drive until a replacement for The Marc Steiner Show was in place, he said. "It's not fair to ask people to contribute without their hearing what we are going to do," Bienstock said.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | December 21, 2004
The purchase is final - the license transferred - the FCC happy. Now, let's talk catchy call letters. WYPR-FM's new station in Frederick broadcast new call letters yesterday, signaling the official transfer of the former religious station WJTM to the Baltimore public radio station known as Your Public Radio. "The closest name we could come up with was `Your Public Radio in Frederick,'" said Anthony Brandon, WYPR president. The new station is now known as WYPF. Both WYPR and WYPF can be found at 88.1 FM. Since the purchase agreement in February, WYPR has been simulcasting its programming on the Frederick station in anticipation of the Federal Communication Commission's granting the license transfer, which it did last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Technical difficulties, as they euphemistically say in broadcasting, left some NPR affiliates like Baltimore's WYPR scrambling Monday morning. WYPR confirmed that it had problems with the National Public Radio feed Monday. WTMD General Manager Steve Yasko said he believed there had been problems at his station as well, but he did not have the specifics because his morning team was gone for the day when The Sun called. The trouble started at 6 a.m., according to WYPR's Nathan Sterner, who is on-air from Baltimore weekdays during NPR's "Morning Edition.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Veteran Baltimore newsman Sunni Khalid, who was fired in March by WYPR radio, started work Tuesday as an assignment editor at WMAR (Channel 2), he said. Khalid, a former Baltimore Sun and NPR staffer, was the first newsroom employee hired by the city's public radio station. He had been on probation at WYPR for comments he posted on Facebook. It later was alleged that he made an obscene gesture toward another journalist who was visiting the public radio station. Khalid and WYPR declined comment on his dismissal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2012
Dudley Clendinen relished nothing more than telling a great story — even the story of his impending death. A journalist and author who wrote for The New York Times and had once served as an editor for The Baltimore Sun, Mr. Clendinen died Wednesday at Baltimore's Joseph Richey House hospice of complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. He was 67. He chronicled his 18-month struggle with the condition commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease on Baltimore public radio station WYPR in a series titled "Living with Lou: Dudley Clendinen on a Good, Short Life.
NEWS
March 27, 2012
I read the very brief article "Managing news editor Sunni Khalid out at WYPR-FM" (March 19). I really expected more. Was this an example of censorship/McCarthyism at the public radio station? Criticize the Israeli occupation on Facebook, and your head must roll? Does the station believe in the First Amendment right to free speech? Why can't an employee express his personal belief on Facebook as long as his perspective does not affect the work he does for the station? And it was a journalistic low for The Sun to claim that Mr. Khalid made an obscene gesture to a former Sun employee who refused to name the alleged individual.
NEWS
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Sunni Khalid, managing news editor at WYPR-FM, has been dropped by the public radio station after more than nine years on the job there. His departure from WYPR was confirmed in an email by a newsroom staffer sent to colleagues at the station and elsewhere Monday. His last day was Friday. Khalid and WYPR management both declined comment Wednesday. Khalid, a former Baltimore Sun reporter, had been on probation in February for comments he posted on the Facebook page of a friend questioning the influence of Israel on American politics.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
At the paragraph factory tonight we will be covering the outcome of the Iowa caucuses. Never mind that the winner of these caucuses does not necessarily do well in subsequent contests, or that no actual delegates to the Republican National Convention are selected, or that Iowans - no disrespect - are not particularly representative of the electorate. This hypertrophic straw poll is the first formal contest of the election year, and so it must be important. At The New Yorker George Packer observes sardonically , “Political journalism - unlike war reporting - long ago stopped being about what is true or important.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
Talk-show host Marc Steiner, whose forced exit from WYPR-FM set off a firestorm of protest and left his fans calling for the removal of station management, will resurface next week with a weekly morning show on WEAA-FM. The new hourlong Marc Steiner Show will air at 9 a.m. Wednesdays on WEAA (88.9), which broadcasts from the campus of Morgan State University. Plans call for the show to air daily beginning in the fall, possibly as early as September, Steiner said. "We're very excited," said the radio host, whose show will be produced by his own Center for Emerging Media.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | April 3, 2008
Two months after WYPR fired him, Marc Steiner won a Peabody Award yesterday - just as the public radio station kicked off a fund drive that it had postponed in the wake of the intense outcry that followed the host's dismissal. The Peabody recognized Steiner's 2007 series titled Just Words, a documentary that featured the voices of addicts, ex-felons and the homeless. Steiner, who nominated his work for the prize, called it "an amazing honor." "The idea was that nobody heard the words and stories of the working poor of America and what they have to say about their own lives," Steiner said.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley and Republican former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. sparred for months over the format and forum for a political debate, and finally agreed Thursday to one that will air on Baltimore's WJZ-TV. The candidates will tape an hourlong debate, moderated by veteran anchor Denise Koch and sponsored by the Baltimore Jewish Council, at 10 a.m. Oct. 11 in the station's studio. It will air at 7 that evening, a prime-time slot. "We are very pleased that both candidates ... have agreed to a debate," said WJZ vice president and general manager Jay Newman.
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