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NEWS
March 6, 2007
On March 2, 2007, WYNTON M. Visitation 2140 N. Fulton Avenue Wednesday 2 - 8 P.M. Family will receive friends in the chapel Thursday 10 A.M., funeral to follow at 10:30 A.M.
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NEWS
March 6, 2007
On March 2, 2007, WYNTON M. Visitation 2140 N. Fulton Avenue Wednesday 2 - 8 P.M. Family will receive friends in the chapel Thursday 10 A.M., funeral to follow at 10:30 A.M.
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NEWS
By THE ST. PETERSBURG (FLA.) TIMES | April 28, 2006
You cannot make something in the arts exciting for somebody who is raised looking at videos of the most well-buffed people in the world with their a-- hanging out."- WYNTON MARSALIS, jazz musician, on young people and the arts
NEWS
By THE ST. PETERSBURG (FLA.) TIMES | April 28, 2006
You cannot make something in the arts exciting for somebody who is raised looking at videos of the most well-buffed people in the world with their a-- hanging out."- WYNTON MARSALIS, jazz musician, on young people and the arts
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 19, 2001
Washington likes inaugurations so much, they ought to hold one every year. Ashcroft said all the right things. Sorry. A jazz lover is someone who wants to hear Louis Armstrong playing his horn, not Wynton Marsalis talking about Louis playing it. You could (A) take the family to the Super Bowl; (B) send the kids to college or (C) plan a comfortable retirement. Choose one.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 13, 2003
As you examine the lines and movements of a Romare Bearden work - Drum Chorus (1986), Slapping Seventh Avenue With the Sole of My Shoes (1981) and others - you can hear the music. You can hear the horns ebb, flow and soar, the drums roll, the voices wail and explode. No other visual artist captured with paint and photographs the essence, the funk, the soul of the African-American experience the way Bearden did. Like the jazz that inspired him, the paintings swing - the rhythms aflame in oils, watercolors and collages.
FEATURES
By Howard Reich and Howard Reich,Chicago Tribune | February 13, 1992
The rain has been pouring for three hours straight, the air is thick enough to slice, the temperature is climbing to unbearable levels -- but the crowds just keep on coming.By the score, they're packing a small New Orleans church, its every pew and aisle jammed to capacity.And up near the pulpit, the most celebrated young trumpeter in jazz is fielding questions from the audience, which welcomes his words like a devout congregation.Clearly, the applause and "amens" suggest the crowd is pleased to see the most famous member of New Orleans' most beloved musical family back in the city where jazz, blues and Wynton Marsalis himself were born.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1990
COMPLIMENTS are widely distributed within the tight-knit circles of jazz artists living in New York City.It seems no one of late has come close to the quantity or quality of praise that saxophone player Branford Marsalis has received.Called a "Renaissance man" by several media critics and ''the future of jazz music" by others, Marsalis has virtually left his younger brother Wynton behind with his volume of work that includes writing, composing and acting.Yet despite his immense power, not even Marsalis could save his piano player, Kenny Kirkland -- whom he said was "the most sought after player in New York" -- from being snatched away by a greater force.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | March 15, 1991
Only three people will take the stage in Annapolis tomorrow night when Branford Marsalis arrives with his bassist and drummer at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. But anyone paying attention will hear a small army of tradition every time Marsalis blows through his saxophone.More than most jazz musicians, Marsalis has made a point of explicitly acknowledging the debt he owes to those who revolutionized his instrument.On each of his album jackets, Marsalis pays special thanks to thevarious artists forming the creative continuum -- from Duke Ellington, Ben Webster, Charlie Parker and Thelonius Monk to Sonny Rollins, John Coltrane, Ornette Coleman and Wayne Shorter -- that lays the foundation of his own work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
Ellis Louis Marsalis III cooks bacon and biscuits for his 13-year-old son Django's breakfast in their house on the north end of the Belair-Edison neighborhood. Django's eyes are drooping and his hair is tousled after sleeping late, but he manages a languid handshake for a visitor to his block. Django and his father and sister, Maria, who's 12, are just back from Thanksgiving in New York at Uncle Wynton's. Uncle Wynton, of course, is Wynton Marsalis, the brilliant jazz trumpet player, composer, artistic director of the new performing arts center for jazz at New York's Lincoln Center -- and leader of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
Composer, conductor and pianist Darin Atwater and poet-photographer Ellis Marsalis III have combined their talents to put together an innovative musical and photographic work that tells their story of the long, sweeping struggle of a people in transition from Africa to America. They've collaborated for nearly a year on the 10-part concert suite, Evolution of a People, which will premiere at 8 p.m. Tuesday during the sold-out 20th annual State of Maryland Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff | December 5, 2004
Ellis Louis Marsalis III cooks bacon and biscuits for his 13-year-old son Django's breakfast in their house on the north end of the Belair-Edison neighborhood. Django's eyes are drooping and his hair is tousled after sleeping late, but he manages a languid handshake for a visitor to his block. Django and his father and sister, Maria, who's 12, are just back from Thanksgiving in New York at Uncle Wynton's. Uncle Wynton, of course, is Wynton Marsalis, the brilliant jazz trumpet player, composer, artistic director of the new performing arts center for jazz at New York's Lincoln Center -- and leader of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 13, 2003
As you examine the lines and movements of a Romare Bearden work - Drum Chorus (1986), Slapping Seventh Avenue With the Sole of My Shoes (1981) and others - you can hear the music. You can hear the horns ebb, flow and soar, the drums roll, the voices wail and explode. No other visual artist captured with paint and photographs the essence, the funk, the soul of the African-American experience the way Bearden did. Like the jazz that inspired him, the paintings swing - the rhythms aflame in oils, watercolors and collages.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 19, 2001
Washington likes inaugurations so much, they ought to hold one every year. Ashcroft said all the right things. Sorry. A jazz lover is someone who wants to hear Louis Armstrong playing his horn, not Wynton Marsalis talking about Louis playing it. You could (A) take the family to the Super Bowl; (B) send the kids to college or (C) plan a comfortable retirement. Choose one.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 13, 1999
If jazz is America's classical music, why aren't there more groups like the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra?Clearly, if one accepts the idea that jazz has more than its share of great composers, then the need for a jazz repertory company seems obvious. How can the work of a genius like Duke Ellington be treasured if his compositions and arrangements are no longer being played?But as the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra made plain during its performance at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Tuesday, hearing another jazz band play Ellington is not the same thing as hearing the Ellington Band itself.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 7, 1998
MOSCOW -- Wynton Marsalis was here to play his trumpet and talk about jazz yesterday, but let's just take that as a starting point because there's always a wider sense of things -- particularly in a country like Russia that lives by suggestion and improvisation."
FEATURES
By Diego Ribadeneira and Diego Ribadeneira,BOSTON GLOBE | October 8, 1995
For consistently outstanding writing and a thought-provoking mix of articles, few magazines do better than Harper's.This month, Barry Lopez offers a fascinating and revealing piece on cargo planes and the odd things they carry. Most of the stranger items involve food and reflect the world's diverse cravings -- ostrich and horse meat and bear testicles. Then there are durians -- "pulpy, melon-sized fruit whose scent reminds most Westerners of vomit."In the same Harper's and just in time for Halloween, don't miss Ted C. Fishman's frightening damned-if-you-do/damned-if-you-don't look at the stock market.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | January 15, 2006
Composer, conductor and pianist Darin Atwater and poet-photographer Ellis Marsalis III have combined their talents to put together an innovative musical and photographic work that tells their story of the long, sweeping struggle of a people in transition from Africa to America. They've collaborated for nearly a year on the 10-part concert suite, Evolution of a People, which will premiere at 8 p.m. Tuesday during the sold-out 20th annual State of Maryland Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall.
FEATURES
By Diego Ribadeneira and Diego Ribadeneira,BOSTON GLOBE | October 8, 1995
For consistently outstanding writing and a thought-provoking mix of articles, few magazines do better than Harper's.This month, Barry Lopez offers a fascinating and revealing piece on cargo planes and the odd things they carry. Most of the stranger items involve food and reflect the world's diverse cravings -- ostrich and horse meat and bear testicles. Then there are durians -- "pulpy, melon-sized fruit whose scent reminds most Westerners of vomit."In the same Harper's and just in time for Halloween, don't miss Ted C. Fishman's frightening damned-if-you-do/damned-if-you-don't look at the stock market.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | April 11, 1993
As the first musician ever to have been signed simultaneously to the jazz and classical divisions of Columbia Records, Wynton Marsalis is intimately familiar with the differences and similarities between the two worlds. We spoke to him over the phone, during a tour stop in Boston, and asked what he thought about treating jazz like classical music.Q: Lately, it seems as if certain kinds of music from the pre-rock era are being treated with the same reverence as classical music. What does this portend for jazz?
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