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Wyndham Hotel

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NEWS
April 14, 2006
DeAngelo D. Hunter, a hotel worker and Baltimore resident, died Tuesday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center after being stabbed. He was 24. Mr. Hunter was stabbed late Monday night in the 3300 block of Old Frederick Road. Police said yesterday that they had made no arrests in the case. Mr. Hunter was born in Baltimore and raised in Edmondson Village. He attended Walbrook High School, where he was shortstop on the school's varsity baseball team. He earned his General Educational Development diploma and was a former employee at the Baltimore RESCO waste-to-energy plant in Westport.
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NEWS
April 14, 2006
DeAngelo D. Hunter, a hotel worker and Baltimore resident, died Tuesday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center after being stabbed. He was 24. Mr. Hunter was stabbed late Monday night in the 3300 block of Old Frederick Road. Police said yesterday that they had made no arrests in the case. Mr. Hunter was born in Baltimore and raised in Edmondson Village. He attended Walbrook High School, where he was shortstop on the school's varsity baseball team. He earned his General Educational Development diploma and was a former employee at the Baltimore RESCO waste-to-energy plant in Westport.
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NEWS
November 23, 1997
SINCE IT WAS first proposed, the 750-room Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel has grown from 27 stories to a nearly 50-story monster that would overshadow the waterfront south of Little Italy. Could it get even bigger?It could be almost anything it wants.If two controversial bills are enacted, the City Council would sign away its oversight authority. Then it would pretty much be up to the development team led by John Paterakis, a political donor to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and council members, to call the shots.
BUSINESS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
Downtown Baltimore will get a second Sheraton hotel when the 707-room Wyndham Baltimore Inner Harbor takes on a new flag by year's end. The 27-story twin towers will operate as the Sheraton City Center after an overhaul of the hotel's rooms and public spaces, officials said yesterday. The property, at 101 W. Fayette St. in Charles Center, is just a few blocks north of the Sheraton Inner Harbor at 300 S. Charles St. The reflagging will be the property's fourth brand, after previously operating as a Hilton and an Omni.
NEWS
April 6, 1998
WHEN THE City Council votes today on a $40.9 million tax abatement and aid package for the Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel, it must make a political judgment. There is no conclusive evidence, in this good economic climate, to prove that a new downtown hotel needs taxpayer help.Similarly, there is no guarantee that a hefty infusion of public aid produces room rates that stay affordable. Rates, after all, reflect demand and desirability.Uncertainties continue: Congressional committees in Washington are pondering legislative changes that could strip Patriot American Hospitality Inc. (and a handful of other companies)
NEWS
February 8, 1998
AFTER MONTHS of public wrangling, the financing and design details for the Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel finally have emerged. A building that at one point was to be a 48-story skyscraper has been scaled down to 31 floors.Public funding for the $134 million project also has been decreased. It now totals $41 million, including forgiveness of real estate taxes for 25 years, $5.5 million in outright taxpayer grants and a $5 million loan.In return, the city is promised a share of the hotel's eventual profits.
NEWS
December 21, 1997
MIDWAY THROUGH his first term as the city's No. 2 elected official, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III is engaged in a delicate juggling act. Narrowly elected in a four-way race in 1995, he seeks to broaden his base and make himself relevant on a council where most members are in the camp of his antagonist, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.So far, Mr. Bell is not succeeding.The recent votes on the controversial Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel were a prime example. This was a perfect opportunity for Mr. Bell to stand up for the principle of legislative oversight of taxpayer-funded development projects and to cast himself as a viable alternative to Mr. Schmoke, a strong supporter of the hotel.
NEWS
December 15, 1997
WHEN DEVELOPERS of the Inner Harbor East Wyndham Hotel recently expressed their willingness to give up $20 million in taxpayer-backed bonds, they said they were being flexible and bowing to the City Council's wishes.What the politically connected developers did not say was that the $20 million subsidy was money they had not originally expected to get. It was added last summer to a yet-incomplete aid package by the Baltimore Development Corp., the Schmoke administration's economic development arm.This revelation raises questions about the way the BDC has been bargaining with developers headed by John Paterakis, the bakery tycoon who is a long-time financial contributor to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and several City Council members.
NEWS
November 25, 1997
THE CITY COUNCIL acted prudently by not taking hasty action last night on two zoning bills concerning the proposed Inner Harbor East Wyndham Hotel. Now that consideration of those measures has been postponed until at least Jan. 26, the City Council should use the next nine weeks to make sure that it has all the answers about that controversial project.For example, we still do not know how massive that $132.6 million hotel would be. Would it really become the city's second-tallest building, rising some 50 stories -- or 500 feet -- over the harbor's edge, as some drawings suggest?
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1997
THE WYNDHAM hotel proposed for Baltimore's Inner Harbor East renewal area, initially planned to rise 32 stories, might be as many as 50 stories tall.During a meeting last week of Baltimore's Architectural Review Board, architects of the $132.6 million hotel presented four variations of the design, with heights ranging from 44 to 50 stories.Any of the versions would make the hotel planned for President and Aliceanna streets one of the tallest buildings in downtown Baltimore. The 44-story version would be 459 feet.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Payne and Michelle Payne,Special to Baltimoresun.com | July 26, 2004
Finding employment in today's competitive market has gone far beyond mere ink and paper. It no longer consists of hours spent scouring classified advertisements in newspapers and mailing out resumes. Today, the process is more technologically advanced -- and for those who are uncomfortable with the Internet, the online job hunt can be daunting. The Re-Employment Assistance Center, however, has a solution. The Towson-based center will sponsor "Looking for Work in the 21st Century" today from 8:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at its offices at 901 Dulaney Valley Road.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2000
As a teen-ager, Alan Hunt's favorite game was constructing shelters, using trees in the woods behind his upstate New York home. "I would go in the woods and build tree forts or build a log cabin when I was 13," he said. "I always loved to build." Some things haven't changed for Hunt, who turned 41 yesterday. Construction is in his blood. The scope of his work, however, has grown immensely, and today he is managing the construction of what will become downtown Baltimore's largest hotel.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1999
The Baltimore Homeowners Coalition is using radio advertisements to criticize a city tax break for new hotels.The taxpayers group said the measure will open the door for casino gambling.During the next week, the City Council is expected to grant an estimated $75 million property tax break over 25 years to developers of the Wyndham hotel being built at President and Fleet streets in Inner Harbor East.The homeowners group contends that state law permitting the tax break also would allow the Wyndham hotel's owners, including chief partner H&S Bakery mogul John Paterakis Sr., to add casino gambling if the state ban is lifted.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1999
The Dallas company that is a partner in developing the Wyndham Inner Harbor East Hotel completed a financial restructuring yesterday that it says virtually assures its future involvement in the $134 million lodging project.Patriot American Hospitality Corp.'s restructuring involves a cash infusion of more than $1 billion from a group of investors led by a New York merchant bank, and a commitment from two other firms to refinance $2.45 billion in debt.The capital from Apollo Real Estate Advisors and pledges to refinance other debt from Chase Manhattan Bank and Bear, Stearns & Co. mean that Patriot American is likely to continue as part of the group constructing the 750-room hotel.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1999
The state's second-highest court has upheld a Baltimore Circuit Court ruling that said the 31-story Wyndham Inner Harbor East hotel does not violate a master plan created to guide development in the area near Little Italy.The Court of Special Appeals' ruling on a lawsuit challenging a city ordinance permitting the Wyndham essentially ends a community group's chances to further stall or derail the $134 million project on planning grounds.John C. Murphy, an attorney for the Waterfront Coalition Inc., said the group intends to petition Maryland's highest court to hear the case.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1999
The Schmoke administration is soliciting support for a newly drafted bill that could exempt from city property taxes nearly every new commercial real estate project over $10 million.The legislation, prepared by city officials, would reinstate $75 million in tax breaks for the Wyndham Inner Harbor East hotel.The new bill would allow tax breaks for hotels including the $134 million Wyndham now under construction, as well as new office buildings, retail projects, apartments and garages.The bill, which would grant payments in lieu of taxes (PILOTs)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 18, 1998
DALLAS -- Patriot American Hospitality Inc.'s shares fell 15 percent yesterday, the day after the company agreed to sell a 30 percent stake to an investor group, on concerns that the transaction is too expensive and bad for shareholders.Shares of the Dallas-based real estate investment trust, one of the biggest U.S. hotel companies and owner of the Wyndham hotel chain, fell $1.1875, to $6.75.Patriot American is scheduled to buy the $134 million Wyndham Inner Harbor East Hotel being developed by H&S Bakery Inc. co-owner John Paterakis Sr. and a pair of Atlanta companies.
NEWS
December 14, 1997
THE CITY COUNCIL is about to make a big mistake. It seems willing tomorrow to approve two key bills related to the controversial Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel, even though there is not yet a firm financing package detailing huge taxpayer subsidies for the $132.6 million project.The approvals would enable John Paterakis and his partners to build a 430-foot hotel, the city's second tallest skyscraper, on land that has a 180-foot height limit. The action would amount to an early Christmas gift to the long-time political contributor to Mayor Kurt Schmoke and several members of the council.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 18, 1998
DALLAS -- Patriot American Hospitality Inc.'s shares fell 15 percent yesterday, the day after the company agreed to sell a 30 percent stake to an investor group, on concerns that the transaction is too expensive and bad for shareholders.Shares of the Dallas-based real estate investment trust, one of the biggest U.S. hotel companies and owner of the Wyndham hotel chain, fell $1.1875, to $6.75.Patriot American is scheduled to buy the $134 million Wyndham Inner Harbor East Hotel being developed by H&S Bakery Inc. co-owner John Paterakis Sr. and a pair of Atlanta companies.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1998
With a flock of jittery, curious sea gulls overhead and the constant noise of heavy machinery surrounding him, Alan Hunt surveyed the holes in the ground that many believed would never be dug.Several yards away, a drill rising eight stories pierced the wet ground, on its way to creating a cavity 70 feet deep and the future foundation of the Wyndham Inner Harbor East Hotel."
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