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By Holly Selby | February 19, 1997
The Baltimore Museum of Art's exhibition "Andrew Wyeth: America's Painter" attracted 170,000 people during its 20-week run, which ended Sunday, making it the second most-popular show in the museum's 82-year-history, museum officials announced yesterday.The record was set when "Claude Monet: Impressionist Masterpieces from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston" drew 215,000 people during its 14-week show from October 1991 to January 1992, said Becca Seitz, director of public relations and marketing.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Houppert and Karen Houppert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2009
Andrew Wyeth, who died last week at 91, might be the one contemporary American artist that every American knows. They may not think they know his work, but they do. How about that cute little picture of a yellow lab curled in the middle of a four-poster bed that hangs in your vet's office? Andrew Wyeth. How about that framed poster of an open window - shade half-drawn, lace curtain billowing - that the country-kitchen diner on the corner displays next to a real window, lace curtain billowing in a life-imitates-art tribute?
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BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2004
MedImmune Inc. will assume global control of the FluMist influenza vaccine program after it and partner Wyeth yesterday ended their collaboration, the two firms said. As part of the deal, the Gaithersburg biotech also will gain the rights and clinical research data for an improved version of FluMist, a nasal-spray flu inoculation. The new version, called CAIV-T, is projected to reach the market in 2007. "As we have said, we do remain committed to FluMist," said MedImmune spokeswoman Jamie Lacey.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 17, 2009
Andrew Wyeth, whose durable and realistic paintings of rural Pennsylvania and Maine made him one of America's best-loved artists, and made his paintings some of the priciest in the world, died yesterday. He was 91. Mr. Wyeth, who divided his time between Chadds Ford, Pa., and Cushing, Maine, died in his sleep at his home in Pennsylvania, the Brandywine River Museum told the Associated Press. Hundreds of Mr. Wyeth's paintings are displayed at the museum. In 2006, a retrospective of his work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art attracted more than 175,000 visitors in about four months.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 29, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- Suffering from colorectal cancer, Tom McAuliffe was in such pain that he had to sleep standing up, propped against a couch. Now he can rest easier, thanks to a new pain medicine derived from an unlikely source: the venom of a snail from a coral reef off the Philippines. When the drug received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration in December, it was believed to be the first time the agency has approved a medicine that is an exact copy of a chemical found in the ocean.
NEWS
January 2, 1996
Carolyn L. Goodyear, 78, homemaker, avid travelerCarolyn L. Goodyear, a homemaker who grew up in Baltimore, died of heart failure Dec. 24 while vacationing in Boco Grande, Fla. She was 78.She was born Carolyn Lebering in 1917 and attended Baltimore area schools. As a young girl, she was a student at the Greenwood School in Ruxton, which now serves as the headquarters for the Baltimore County School System. She graduated in 1936.In 1939, she married Stuart M. Wyeth. The couple moved to Philadelphia after World War II and she volunteered with the Women's Committee of the Children's Hospital of Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2004
Conceding that last flu season's launch of the FluMist nasal-spray influenza vaccine was mishandled, MedImmune Inc. said yesterday that it will spend more than $100 million to take sole control of the troubled product. Wyeth announced late Monday that it was bailing out of its FluMist collaboration with MedImmune. Yesterday, the Gaithersburg biotechnology company discussed what had gone wrong and the financial impact of Wyeth's decision. In a conference call with investors and analysts, MedImmune's top executives said it has become clear that for FluMist - and a successor product - to succeed, one company had to take control.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | December 10, 1998
Museums by candlelightTwenty-three heritage sites throughout Frederick County will be illuminated Saturday during the 10th annual self-guided tour of "Museums by Candlelight." The family program is presented by the Frederick Historic Sites Consortium as part of a holiday Children's Weekend. Tours include interpretive programs, living history vignettes, hearth cooking and traditional craft demonstrations, hands-on art activities and storytelling.Due to the number of locations and area covered, the "Museums by Candlelight" guide suggests three itineraries for visitors to follow - a North Frederick Route, including the Seton Shrine in Emmitsburg and the Heritage Farm Preservation Society in Walkersville; a Frederick City itinerary that includes the Schifferstadt Architectural Museum and the National Museum of Civil War Medicine; and a South Frederick Route with the Lamar Cultural and Heritage Center in Middletown and Ostertag Farm in Myersville.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
In the waning months of the Bush administration, the Food and Drug Administration is asking the courts to extend the Republican Party's anti-regulatory zealotry well beyond the president's last day in office. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on whether a woman who lost an arm after being improperly injected with a drug could sue the company that manufactured it, and the administration was on exactly the wrong side of the issue. The case involved musician Diana Levine, who was given the anti-nausea drug Phenergan, made by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, after she visited a Vermont clinic in 2000 seeking relief from a migraine.
NEWS
September 12, 1990
Services for James B. Montfort Jr., retired district sales manager for Wyeth Laboratories, will be held at noon tomorrow at All Saints Episcopal Church in the St. Mary's County community of Oakley.Mr. Montfort, who was 56 and lived on Jarrettsville Pike in Monkton, died Monday of heart failure at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.He retired a year ago because of ill health as manager of the pharmaceutical company's Baltimore district, which includes most of Maryland.Born in Washington and reared in Chevy Chase, Mr. Montfort was a page in the House of Representatives and a 1952 graduate of the school for pages.
NEWS
November 7, 2008
In the waning months of the Bush administration, the Food and Drug Administration is asking the courts to extend the Republican Party's anti-regulatory zealotry well beyond the president's last day in office. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on whether a woman who lost an arm after being improperly injected with a drug could sue the company that manufactured it, and the administration was on exactly the wrong side of the issue. The case involved musician Diana Levine, who was given the anti-nausea drug Phenergan, made by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, after she visited a Vermont clinic in 2000 seeking relief from a migraine.
NEWS
November 13, 2006
George M. Davenport Jr., a pharmaceutical sales executive at Wyeth Co. for more than 40 years, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 93. A pharmacist by training, Mr. Davenport, who was born in Cordova, Ala., began his career at Wyeth in the mid-1930s and eventually rose to serve as sales manager for the company's Baltimore division. After retiring, he opened a Christmas tree farm in Hereford, which he ran for about a decade.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
YOU CAN SEE WHY PEOPLE MIGHT have been afraid of Karl Kuerner. Technically, Kuerner is absent from "Groundhog Day," the 1959 painting by the great American master, Andrew Wyeth. In reality, the artwork, which is of Kuerner's kitchen and the view outside his window, is suffused with the presence of the former Pennsylvania farmer, who died in 1978. ANDREW WYETH: MEMORY AND MAGIC / / Through July 16 / / Philadelphia Museum of Art / / 215-235-7469
TRAVEL
By TONI STROUD SALAMA and TONI STROUD SALAMA,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 19, 2006
There's no such thing as too much Andrew Wyeth. In the words of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the American painter is one of the country's most recognized and beloved artists. His career has, so far, spanned seven decades and is the subject of an exhibition at the museum: Andrew Wyeth: Memory & Magic, March 29 to July 16. During those same dates and some 30 miles away, the Delaware Art Museum in Wilmington, Del., will exhibit Something Waits Beneath It: Early Work by Andrew Wyeth, 1939-1969.
TRAVEL
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
It was a golden, early November day, all the more beautiful for the lingering foliage season. My husband, Tom, and I slipped off I-95 north of the Susquehanna River and into the countryside where Maryland fades into Pennsylvania. As we drove toward Chadds Ford, the community immortalized by painter N.C. Wyeth and his descendants, their artistic inspiration was made plain by a landscape of silos, stubbled fields, stone walls and ridges of brilliant fall colors, animated by confetti flutters of leaves.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder / Tribune | July 29, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- Suffering from colorectal cancer, Tom McAuliffe was in such pain that he had to sleep standing up, propped against a couch. Now he can rest easier, thanks to a new pain medicine derived from an unlikely source: the venom of a snail from a coral reef off the Philippines. When the drug received clearance from the Food and Drug Administration in December, it was believed to be the first time the agency has approved a medicine that is an exact copy of a chemical found in the ocean.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
MedImmune Inc., maker of the new FluMist nasal spray, expects to miss its sales and profits targets because it and its marketing partner bet wrongly that consumers would gladly pay a huge premium for a flu vaccine that sidesteps a painful injection. MedImmune reduced its fourth-quarter and year-end guidance on earnings and revenue yesterday, due to "lower than expected product demand for FluMist," while emphasizing that its other businesses remain very strong. MedImmune, a Gaithersburg biotechnology company, and partner Wyeth , of Madison, N.J., rolled out FluMist this year with a $25 million advertising campaign.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1994
It took 20 minutes to insert six matchstick-size rods of %J Norplant into Mitzi Silber's left arm. But it took a whole summer to get them out.The 34-year-old Westminster woman stopped using the contraceptive last year after her body began rejecting it. Removal took three trips to the doctor -- 45 minutes for the first two sticks, 90 minutes for the next three and 45 minutes for the last one, which had to be located by ultrasound exam.Norplant's manufacturer, Wyeth-Ayerst Laboratories, had stated on its initial labeling that removal of all the sticks should be a routine, 20-minute procedure.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2004
MedImmune Inc. reported a smaller-than-expected second-quarter loss yesterday, but must now focus on improving its existing drugs, including its problem-plagued FluMist, even as it works to bring promising new products to market. "MedImmune's main focus must now be on [long-term] growth," said Jennifer M. Chao, a senior biotechnology analyst for Deutsche Bank in New York. "We don't expect to get any major news - such as clinical trial results - until the end of this year" at the earliest.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2004
Conceding that last flu season's launch of the FluMist nasal-spray influenza vaccine was mishandled, MedImmune Inc. said yesterday that it will spend more than $100 million to take sole control of the troubled product. Wyeth announced late Monday that it was bailing out of its FluMist collaboration with MedImmune. Yesterday, the Gaithersburg biotechnology company discussed what had gone wrong and the financial impact of Wyeth's decision. In a conference call with investors and analysts, MedImmune's top executives said it has become clear that for FluMist - and a successor product - to succeed, one company had to take control.
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