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By Blair S. Walker | September 24, 1991
A Washington radio station owner with dreams of establishing a broadcasting empire has signed a second contract to purchase WWIN 1400 AM and 95.9 FM, this time for $4.7 million.Cathy Hughes had agreed to buy the Baltimore station for $6.3 million last fall, but changed her mind in December, noting that "it's a lender's market." Although Ms. Hughes forfeited a $200,000 down payment, the wait paid off handsomely in the form of a $1.6 million drop in WWIN's value when the second pact was inked last month.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
John Wendell Compton Sr., a retired disc jockey known on the air as Sir Johnny O, died of heart failure Oct. 29 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Randallstown resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised on Division Street, he was the son of Herbert Roy Compton Sr., a Baptist preacher, and Esther Mae Compton, a homemaker. He was a 1956 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. He then served in the Army. He went into radio broadcasting and worked at WWRL-AM in New York and WDAS-AM radio in Philadelphia.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson and Eric Siegel and Robert Hilson and Eric Siegel,Staff Writers Staff writer Sheridan Lyons contributed to this article | October 1, 1992
Alfred Jerome Stewart, a morning drive-time personality for gospel radio station WWIN-AM, was shot to death late last night in what city police said appeared to be a drug-related slaying.Mr. Stewart, 51, of the 8700 block of Mary Lane in Jessup, was found with multiple gunshot wounds in the back beside his Mercedes-Benz just south of Clifton Park.Police were summoned there -- at a corner of Cliftview Avenue and Harford Road -- at 11:25 p.m. by reports of a shooting. Mr. Stewart was pronounced dead by paramedics at the scene 12 minutes later, police said.
BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2003
Radio listeners in Baltimore will be able to hear local stations broadcast digitally as early as this spring, executives at iBiquity Digital Corp. announced yesterday. The market is among 40 where broadcasters are adopting a technology that promises better reception for listeners. WWIN 95.9 FM is the first local station to adopt the technology, but iBiquity executives said there could be others in the area to license it before the end of the first quarter. The first wave of users includes about 130 radio stations in 26 states and covering 40 markets.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | December 19, 1990
Radio station owner Cathy Hughes, who owns two outlets in Washington, has dropped her bid to purchase WWIN, 1400 AM and 95.9 FM in Baltimore.Ms. Hughes said she had two funding sources lined up but characterized their financial terms as unsatisfactory. She had been negotiating to buy WWIN, which is owned by the Ragan Henry Broadcast Group, for at least nine months. The asking price for WWIN was $6.9 million in March, although Ms. Hughes said the price had been reduced since then.Ms. Hughes, who owns Almic Broadcasting Inc. along with her son, Alfred Liggins, declined to say what the new price tag was."
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
The problem with playing musical chairs is that there has to be a loser, and the loser in this case turns out to be longtime Baltimore disc jockey Tim Watts.Watts, a fixture on Baltimore's airwaves for nearly two decades, was unceremoniously bounced from his job at WWIN-FM (95.9) last month, apparently to make room on the payroll for Frank Ski, another popular veteran of the city's airwaves. Over the summer, Ski switched his base of operations from WXYV-FM (103.7) to WERQ-FM (92.3). Both WERQ and WWIN are owned by Baltimore-based Radio One."
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Michael James and Sheridan Lyons and Michael James,Staff Writers | October 2, 1992
Radio personality Alfred Jerome Stewart was shot and killed in a drug-infested area of East Baltimore, and police say he died with two vials of suspected crack cocaine in his hand.Mr. Stewart, a morning drive-time disc jockey for gospel radio station WWIN-AM, was shot several times in the back at 11:25 p.m. Wednesday at the corner of Cliftview Avenue and Harford )) Road.Mr. Stewart apparently parked in his Mercedes-Benz in front of a carryout restaurant shortly before he was shot. Police found him lying beside the car, its engine still running.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1999
Looking to broaden its campaign of radio station acquisitions, Radio One Inc. filed yesterday for the sale of 5 million shares of its common stock. At current prices, the issuance would raise about $225 million.The Lanham-based company, the largest radio broadcaster primarily targeting African-Americans, described the purposes of the stock offering in a registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.While Radio One plans to use some of the money from the stock sale to pay down its $96.5 million debt, the company is eager to use part of the proceeds to finance more stations.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
Radio station WBAL-AM (1090) held the top position in the fall ratings, but just barely. Without Orioles baseball for most of the ratings period, the talk/news station heard the country music sound of WPOC-FM (93.1) twanging loudly just behind.The country music station, in fact, ranked first in the Arbitron measurements of adult listeners in the 25-to-54 age group, and was second and third, respectively, in the ratings for women and men 18 and older."It's been a good year for us," said WPOC program director Robert Moody.
NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITER | September 19, 1990
WESTMINSTER - That mellow, familiar voice on the radio -- is it really the Jack Edwards that you've listened to on Baltimore stations for years?Indeed it is, as many listeners of WTTR radio discovered a month ago when Edwards took over the 10 a.m.- to -2 p.m. midday slot at the station."
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1999
Looking to broaden its campaign of radio station acquisitions, Radio One Inc. filed yesterday for the sale of 5 million shares of its common stock. At current prices, the issuance would raise about $225 million.The Lanham-based company, the largest radio broadcaster primarily targeting African-Americans, described the purposes of the stock offering in a registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.While Radio One plans to use some of the money from the stock sale to pay down its $96.5 million debt, the company is eager to use part of the proceeds to finance more stations.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1996
Maurice "HotRod" Hulbert Jr., the self-proclaimed "bald-headed prince" of radio during his three decades on Baltimore airwaves, died Monday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Towson. He was 80.One of the first black hosts at a white-owned radio station when he started at WITH in Baltimore in 1951, Mr. Hulbert immediately influenced the music the city listened to by playing songs of black artists that previously had been kept off the air."He was unbelievable. He was so far ahead of his time," said Jack Edwards, a WITH disc jockey and a 40-year Baltimore radio personality.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1996
The problem with playing musical chairs is that there has to be a loser, and the loser in this case turns out to be longtime Baltimore disc jockey Tim Watts.Watts, a fixture on Baltimore's airwaves for nearly two decades, was unceremoniously bounced from his job at WWIN-FM (95.9) last month, apparently to make room on the payroll for Frank Ski, another popular veteran of the city's airwaves. Over the summer, Ski switched his base of operations from WXYV-FM (103.7) to WERQ-FM (92.3). Both WERQ and WWIN are owned by Baltimore-based Radio One."
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 13, 1993
Radio station WBAL-AM (1090) held the top position in the fall ratings, but just barely. Without Orioles baseball for most of the ratings period, the talk/news station heard the country music sound of WPOC-FM (93.1) twanging loudly just behind.The country music station, in fact, ranked first in the Arbitron measurements of adult listeners in the 25-to-54 age group, and was second and third, respectively, in the ratings for women and men 18 and older."It's been a good year for us," said WPOC program director Robert Moody.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Michael James and Sheridan Lyons and Michael James,Staff Writers | October 2, 1992
Radio personality Alfred Jerome Stewart was shot and killed in a drug-infested area of East Baltimore, and police say he died with two vials of suspected crack cocaine in his hand.Mr. Stewart, a morning drive-time disc jockey for gospel radio station WWIN-AM, was shot several times in the back at 11:25 p.m. Wednesday at the corner of Cliftview Avenue and Harford )) Road.Mr. Stewart apparently parked in his Mercedes-Benz in front of a carryout restaurant shortly before he was shot. Police found him lying beside the car, its engine still running.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson and Eric Siegel and Robert Hilson and Eric Siegel,Staff Writers Staff writer Sheridan Lyons contributed to this article | October 1, 1992
Alfred Jerome Stewart, a morning drive-time personality for gospel radio station WWIN-AM, was shot to death late last night in what city police said appeared to be a drug-related slaying.Mr. Stewart, 51, of the 8700 block of Mary Lane in Jessup, was found with multiple gunshot wounds in the back beside his Mercedes-Benz just south of Clifton Park.Police were summoned there -- at a corner of Cliftview Avenue and Harford Road -- at 11:25 p.m. by reports of a shooting. Mr. Stewart was pronounced dead by paramedics at the scene 12 minutes later, police said.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1996
Maurice "HotRod" Hulbert Jr., the self-proclaimed "bald-headed prince" of radio during his three decades on Baltimore airwaves, died Monday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Towson. He was 80.One of the first black hosts at a white-owned radio station when he started at WITH in Baltimore in 1951, Mr. Hulbert immediately influenced the music the city listened to by playing songs of black artists that previously had been kept off the air."He was unbelievable. He was so far ahead of his time," said Jack Edwards, a WITH disc jockey and a 40-year Baltimore radio personality.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
John Wendell Compton Sr., a retired disc jockey known on the air as Sir Johnny O, died of heart failure Oct. 29 at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Randallstown resident was 75. Born in Baltimore and raised on Division Street, he was the son of Herbert Roy Compton Sr., a Baptist preacher, and Esther Mae Compton, a homemaker. He was a 1956 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. He then served in the Army. He went into radio broadcasting and worked at WWRL-AM in New York and WDAS-AM radio in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | September 24, 1991
A Washington radio station owner with dreams of establishing a broadcasting empire has signed a second contract to purchase WWIN 1400 AM and 95.9 FM, this time for $4.7 million.Cathy Hughes had agreed to buy the Baltimore station for $6.3 million last fall, but changed her mind in December, noting that "it's a lender's market." Although Ms. Hughes forfeited a $200,000 down payment, the wait paid off handsomely in the form of a $1.6 million drop in WWIN's value when the second pact was inked last month.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | December 19, 1990
Radio station owner Cathy Hughes, who owns two outlets in Washington, has dropped her bid to purchase WWIN, 1400 AM and 95.9 FM in Baltimore.Ms. Hughes said she had two funding sources lined up but characterized their financial terms as unsatisfactory. She had been negotiating to buy WWIN, which is owned by the Ragan Henry Broadcast Group, for at least nine months. The asking price for WWIN was $6.9 million in March, although Ms. Hughes said the price had been reduced since then.Ms. Hughes, who owns Almic Broadcasting Inc. along with her son, Alfred Liggins, declined to say what the new price tag was."
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