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By Baltimore Sun reporter | March 29, 2010
A Carroll County cannon restorer is working on two weapons familiar to New Windsor residents - a pair of Japanese-made howitzers captured during World War II that have sat next to the town's municipal offices for years. "These were captured pieces during the war, and they were brought to America to raise bonds, raise money," Forrest Taylor said, adding, "they were commonly taken on the road by various patriotic organizations that would show them, and often they would be given to small towns."
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Workers at a construction site near houses at Fort Meade found a World War II-era unexploded ordnance buried underground, prompting a temporary evacuation of some homes. Fort Meade spokeswoman Mary Doyle said the 1940s mortar round was about one foot long and "looks like a tiny torpedo. " The device, which was determined to be non-lethal, was disposed of and residents were allowed to return to their homes a couple hours after it was found at around noon Thursday. Doyle said it is not unusual to find unexploded ordnances around Fort Meade, and that typically, a 300-meter area is cordoned off, as was the case with the Heritage Park neighborhood at Fort Meade.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 7, 2011
Thomas W. Brundige III, a retired lawyer and decorated World War II veteran, died Aug. 31 of respiratory failure at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore. The former longtime Stevenson resident was 90. The son of a lawyer and a homemaker, Thomas Worthington Brundige III was born in Baltimore and raised on Winston Avenue in Govans. After graduating from City College in 1938, he enrolled at the Johns Hopkins University, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1942. While at Hopkins, he completed reserve officers training, was commissioned a second lieutenant and entered the Army.
NEWS
By Alain Leray | March 7, 2014
Perhaps the darkest episode in human history, the Holocaust has been at the center of Jewish and world consciousness for over six decades. In the spring of 1940, France was invaded and occupied by Nazi troops. Both my parents and grandparents, who were living in Paris at the time, fled into hiding to survive. During this time, SNCF, the company operating the French railroad system, and the parent company of my current employer, SNCF America, was placed under Nazi command according to Article 13 of the French-German Armistice agreement of June 1940.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | December 29, 2011
Technology has overtaken the U.S. savings bonds. After this year, you will no longer be able to buy a paper bond. All purchases will be made electronically. By going totally electronic, the government is expected to save $120 million over five years. You still will  be able to redeem paper bonds at banks, though. Since 1935, people have purchased the bonds to fund the government's operations. The bonds became a traditional gift for a newborn. The Treasury Department is saying good-bye with an online interactive timeline , which includes cameos of celebrities who promoted the sale of savings bonds over the decades.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
A recent report on the CBS Nightly News noting that an auction of Elizabeth Taylor's jewelry brought in a record $116 million contrasted sharply with another report about middle-class citizens becoming homeless and poverty stricken. The second report focused on a place called Slab City, an abandoned WWII training base in southern California whose population has increased dramatically over the past couple of years due to the ongoing economic crisis and the bust of the housing market.
EXPLORE
May 26, 2011
100 Years Ago — Judge sludge The two items below were used as fillers at the bottom of a page of the Times , with the first item regarding a judge, followed directly by the bit about Cloverleaf. The items' placement was appropriate, the latter providing great commentary on the first. "A Rhode Island Judge has decided that a husband has the right to slap his wife when he catches her going through his pockets. The Cloverleaf Manure Spreader sold by P.T. Bennett of Sykesville is by far the best spreader made.
NEWS
October 5, 2013
If the federal government has enough Park Police who are not furloughed to put barriers up and patrol the national monuments on the Mall, why are they closed? I was very proud to read the article about the veterans not accepting "we are closed" when they paid their visit to the World War II Memorial ("'A little yellow ribbon is not going to stop them,'" Oct. 2). As a Vietnam Vet, I am young enough and live close enough to "The Wall" to visit it another time. Our World War II and Korean War vets who travel from around the country do not have that option.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 8, 2002
Lifelong Baltimorean James P. Gallagher is one of the nation's most prominent railroad photographers. Over the past 50 years, his work has appeared often in The Sun and continues to be published in Trains magazine and other rail-oriented publications and histories. In 1992, he collaborated with Sun staffer Jacques Kelly on what many consider to be his best work, Trackside Maryland: From Railyard to Main Line, published by Greenburg Publishing Co. (The book is due to be reissued next year by Johns Hopkins University Press.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2011
A dispute with its roots in the Holocaust will receive a hearing in Annapolis next week as lawmakers consider legislation that could effectively bar an affiliate of the French national railway from bidding on a contract to operate two of the state's three MARC commuter lines. Bills in the House of Delegates and Senate could require SNCF — Société Nationale des Chemins de fer — to make extensive disclosures of records chronicling its role in the transport of Jews and others from France to Nazi death camps during World War II in order for its subsidiary to bid on the contract.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2013
She is 71 years old, and she has no memory of his voice. But that was her father on the recording, and he called her his "Margaret Ann. " She was glad she was alone when she heard him speak, she said. It was just such a surprise. His voice was so clear, he sounded so much like the rest of his Catonsville family. He spoke slowly and gently. He sounded calm. Sgt. Cody L. Wolf, a turret gunner, died when his plane was shot down over Germany on Jan. 11, 1944. It was just weeks after his holiday greeting had been recorded as part of a 1943 Sunpapers Christmas Show produced by the newspaper's war correspondents in England.
NEWS
October 5, 2013
If the federal government has enough Park Police who are not furloughed to put barriers up and patrol the national monuments on the Mall, why are they closed? I was very proud to read the article about the veterans not accepting "we are closed" when they paid their visit to the World War II Memorial ("'A little yellow ribbon is not going to stop them,'" Oct. 2). As a Vietnam Vet, I am young enough and live close enough to "The Wall" to visit it another time. Our World War II and Korean War vets who travel from around the country do not have that option.
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Sometimes recognition for a job well done is a long time coming. Seventy years ago, Pasadena resident William Tiernan was an 18-year-old sailor in the British Merchant Navy, participating in one of World War II's most dangerous assignments, the Russian Arctic convoy. A couple of weeks ago, the 87-year-old Tiernan received special recognition for that duty with an Arctic Star Medal - an award only recently issued by the British government. "My opinion is that the merchant marine is not recognized like the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines are. That's why we didn't get no medals" until now, the British-born Tiernan said without any bitterness Still, he noted, "To this day, merchant marines cannot join the VFW. " The Russian Arctic convoy, in which Allied troops supplied the Soviet Union in its struggle against invading German forces, has often been referred to as a suicide mission.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
On a sizzling day, one of Maryland's premier summer getaways turned ghost town while an Army bomb squad exploded World War II-era munitions that had washed up at Assateague Island National Seashore. After two muffled explosions late Tuesday morning, a portion of the park reopened, including the main drag, Bayberry Drive, but ocean access and parking were limited, said a park spokeswoman, Rachelle Daigneault. "We are taking our time to make a complete assessment, but we're not anticipating any further issues," said Daigneault, who did not expect the public to cancel plans to visit the island for July 4. Campers milled about and took refuge in the cool darkness of the visitor center movie theater as an ordnance disposal unit from Aberdeen Proving Grounds collected rusted relics - more than 100 pieces - piled them in a pit dug in the soft sand and covered it with blast mats.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Albert Richard Baines Jr., a retired tool designer for Westinghouse Electric Corp. and World War II veteran, died Tuesday at his home in Arnold. He was 92. According to the funeral home handling his service, his death was due to "natural causes. " Born in Baltimore on Sept. 25, 1919, Mr. Baines was raised in Sparrows Point, where he graduated from Sparrows Point High School. He served in the Army as a paratrooper in the Pacific during World War II. He was in the 462nd Parachute Field Artillery, 503rd Regimental Combat Team.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
When the train full of Marine recruits from Baltimore reached Washington, the blacks were made to move to the back. At boot camp in North Carolina, they were forbidden to step onto Camp Lejeune without a white escort. But the worst of it, Howard "Chappie" Williams says, came when training was over. It was the height of World War II, and these first black Marines were kept from the fight. "A lot of good talent was lost as a result of that," said Williams, who drove a truck in an ammunition company during the war. "A lot of men's lives could have been saved had it not been for the warped concept that America had at that time.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2001
As German forces overran Europe in the spring of 1940, massive gold shipments began arriving in the United States from England, France, the Netherlands, Belgium and Norway for safekeeping. As the May invasion of Oslo began, Norwegian officials played a cat and mouse game with some 600,000,000 kronor, which they successfully managed to spirit away from the Nazis aboard a British troopship and deposit in a London bank vault. The next month, a shipment of gold estimated to be in excess of $500 million arrived in New York from England and France, shipped by way of Canada.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
Robert Gaspar Leginus Sr., who flew gliders during World War II and later served as a military intelligence analyst, died Feb. 20. He was 98. Mr. Leginus died at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Columbia, said his son Robert Leginus Jr. He had lived in Columbia since the 1990s. Mr. Leginus was born in 1913 in Wyoming, Pa. He learned to fly at the Wilkes-Barre Wyoming Valley Airport, developing a lifelong fascination with flying and aircraft. "His biggest dream was to become an astronaut," his son said.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
No one could predict in 1940 that World War II was destined to become the deadliest conflict in history, so they couldn't foresee how important the data in the 1940 census might become one day. Information about the lives of U.S. citizens, including those who died in World War II, has been locked away for more than seven decades and is about to be unveiled. And the Howard County Genealogical Society is ready to help people access it. The nation was emerging from the Depression in 1940, the same year that President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented third term in office.
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