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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
One of the last surviving Wurlitzer organs in the country, which once entertained crowds at a posh Baltimore movie theater, will return to a downtown stage after a 42-year hiatus in the suburbs. The 85-year-old instrument will debut in its latest incarnation with a June 24 concert at the Engineers Club in Mount Vernon. Its audiences will be smaller than the 2,000 or so who flocked to the old State Theatre on Monument Street, but the organ has endured the test of time and a few moves.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
One of the last surviving Wurlitzer organs in the country, which once entertained crowds at a posh Baltimore movie theater, will return to a downtown stage after a 42-year hiatus in the suburbs. The 85-year-old instrument will debut in its latest incarnation with a June 24 concert at the Engineers Club in Mount Vernon. Its audiences will be smaller than the 2,000 or so who flocked to the old State Theatre on Monument Street, but the organ has endured the test of time and a few moves.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
A grand Wurlitzer organ, salvaged from a Baltimore movie theater and ensconced in a suburban home since the 1960s, will soon play to audiences at another city institution. After Roy Wagner announced that he wanted to give away the prized possession that he's kept in his Glen Arm basement, several groups offered to take it off his hands. The Baltimore Engineering Society came up with the best option for the Wurlitzer's future, he said. A contractor will soon dismantle the 2.5-ton instrument and put it together again at the Engineers Club in Mount Vernon, a popular venue for galas, receptions, operettas and, maybe soon, silent movies with organ notes trilling in the background.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
A grand Wurlitzer organ, salvaged from a Baltimore movie theater and ensconced in a suburban home since the 1960s, will soon play to audiences at another city institution. After Roy Wagner announced that he wanted to give away the prized possession that he's kept in his Glen Arm basement, several groups offered to take it off his hands. The Baltimore Engineering Society came up with the best option for the Wurlitzer's future, he said. A contractor will soon dismantle the 2.5-ton instrument and put it together again at the Engineers Club in Mount Vernon, a popular venue for galas, receptions, operettas and, maybe soon, silent movies with organ notes trilling in the background.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | September 28, 1990
The PaddockWhere: Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, 245 Shawan Road.Hours: 11 a.m.- midnight Sundays and Mondays, 11 a.m.- 2 a.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays.Menu: Burgers, sandwiches, crab cakes, soups and appetizers.Credit cards: AE, D, DC, MC, V.Call: 785-7000. You can't miss the '50s-themed nightclub Wurlitzer's at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, with its pink neon sign and pulsating music.But there's a second nightspot in this hotel, and it's a horse of an entirely different color. While Wurlitzer's is noisy and nostalgia-fixated, the Paddock is a quiet pub. While Wurlitzer's swings until the wee hours, most of the business types at the Paddock wisely head to bed by midnight.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | April 14, 1991
Sure, restaurant manager Paul Renaldo could be Stash, waitress Tammy Estrada could be Stella. Somebody has to be at Stash & Stella's diner because Stash & Stella are not around, never were and won't be.Some things are real at Stash & Stella's at Marley Station mall; somethings are not.The meatloaf is real, made right there in the kitchen. The fries are fresh cut by hand and the Wurlitzer jukebox really dates from the days when Elvis was a rising star instead of a risen rock 'n' roll martyr.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Roy Wagner's musical treasure requires considerable space, with its 500-some pipes, its floor-to-ceiling relay panel filled with thousands of tiny pneumatic devices and a cumbersome blower with huge, noisy fans and belts. The instrument's elegant console, white and trimmed in gold leaf, dominates any room. And the sound that emanates when a musician tackles its double keyboard, numerous controls and floor pedals is equally grand. Believed to be the last remaining theater organ from a Baltimore movie house, the 1927 Wurlitzer has captured Wagner's fancy since the 1960s, when he used to borrow a key to the old State Theatre on Monument Street to play the shuttered playhouse's 2.5-ton wonder.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2010
He arrives early one steamy morning, an hour or so before opening his domain to the public, and kicks open two big doors to start ventilating the place. Max Hurley wears a name tag that reads "Carousel Technician." A silver-haired Washingtonian, he figures he's the only man in the region with that job title, and as he ramps up his daily routine — the same one he has practiced since 1978 — you don't doubt it. Who else possesses his oddball blend of skills? Hurley, 63, runs the Dentzel Carousel at Bethesda's Glen Echo Park, the historic, 15-ton merry-go-round with 52 hand-carved riding animals that turns 90 years old this summer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 16, 1993
Los Angeles--The taps pour real beer. But the stuff in the glass on the bar in front of where Norm sits and drinks and drinks and drinks is the non-alcoholic kind.The yellow-and-red Wurlitzer jukebox plays real tunes: "The In Crowd" by Dobie Gray, "Heartbreak Hotel" by Elvis Presley, "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" by the Platters and "I Fall to Pieces" by Patsy Cline. But the stairs behind it are fake and go nowhere. There is no Melville's fine seafood restaurant upstairs, as the sign promises.
NEWS
December 17, 2008
On December 15, 2008, ANNA WEIGOLD MUSSINA; beloved wife of the late George A. Mussina; devoted mother of John R. Mussina; also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue on Wednesday from 7 to 9 P.M. A funeral service will be held at 8:30 P.M. Further visitation at Dale Ranck Funeral Service, 125 N. Front Street, Milton, PA, on Thursday from 1 to 2 P.M. Graveside services will be held at Harmony Cemetery on Thursday at 2:30 P.M. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be directed to The Friends of the Wanamaker Wurlitzer Organ Restoration, 105 Charles Drive, Suite G3, Bryn Mawr, PA, 19010.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Roy Wagner's musical treasure requires considerable space, with its 500-some pipes, its floor-to-ceiling relay panel filled with thousands of tiny pneumatic devices and a cumbersome blower with huge, noisy fans and belts. The instrument's elegant console, white and trimmed in gold leaf, dominates any room. And the sound that emanates when a musician tackles its double keyboard, numerous controls and floor pedals is equally grand. Believed to be the last remaining theater organ from a Baltimore movie house, the 1927 Wurlitzer has captured Wagner's fancy since the 1960s, when he used to borrow a key to the old State Theatre on Monument Street to play the shuttered playhouse's 2.5-ton wonder.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2010
He arrives early one steamy morning, an hour or so before opening his domain to the public, and kicks open two big doors to start ventilating the place. Max Hurley wears a name tag that reads "Carousel Technician." A silver-haired Washingtonian, he figures he's the only man in the region with that job title, and as he ramps up his daily routine — the same one he has practiced since 1978 — you don't doubt it. Who else possesses his oddball blend of skills? Hurley, 63, runs the Dentzel Carousel at Bethesda's Glen Echo Park, the historic, 15-ton merry-go-round with 52 hand-carved riding animals that turns 90 years old this summer.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff writer | April 14, 1991
Sure, restaurant manager Paul Renaldo could be Stash, waitress Tammy Estrada could be Stella. Somebody has to be at Stash & Stella's diner because Stash & Stella are not around, never were and won't be.Some things are real at Stash & Stella's at Marley Station mall; somethings are not.The meatloaf is real, made right there in the kitchen. The fries are fresh cut by hand and the Wurlitzer jukebox really dates from the days when Elvis was a rising star instead of a risen rock 'n' roll martyr.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | September 28, 1990
The PaddockWhere: Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, 245 Shawan Road.Hours: 11 a.m.- midnight Sundays and Mondays, 11 a.m.- 2 a.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays.Menu: Burgers, sandwiches, crab cakes, soups and appetizers.Credit cards: AE, D, DC, MC, V.Call: 785-7000. You can't miss the '50s-themed nightclub Wurlitzer's at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, with its pink neon sign and pulsating music.But there's a second nightspot in this hotel, and it's a horse of an entirely different color. While Wurlitzer's is noisy and nostalgia-fixated, the Paddock is a quiet pub. While Wurlitzer's swings until the wee hours, most of the business types at the Paddock wisely head to bed by midnight.
NEWS
October 5, 2008
STAN KANN, 83 Vacuum cleaner collector Stan Kann, an organist with an affinity for antique vacuum cleaners whose unlikely hobby made him a frequent guest on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson and other talk shows, died Monday at St. Louis University Hospital in St. Louis of complications after undergoing open-heart surgery. While Mr. Kann was known in his native St. Louis for playing the Wurlitzer pipe organ at the city's Fabulous Fox Theatre, he began acquiring a national television audience on June 8, 1966, when he first appeared with Mr. Carson on The Tonight Show.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Benny Evangelista and Benny Evangelista,San Francisco Chronicle | September 4, 2000
You're at your favorite bar. You amble up to the new Internet-connected jukebox and punch up your favorite tune. In moments, the jukebox downloads the song, plays it and asks if you want to buy the CD. Then, you notice the jukebox displaying the live video feed of an attractive patron sitting in a bar 3,000 miles away. In seconds, you've e-mailed a hopeful message: "Can I buy you a song and a drink?" Obviously, this is not your father's jukebox. In fact, the bubble-tubed, Art Deco mechanical machines that have survived for a century as an American music icon are about to be transformed by the Internet music revolution.
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