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By Michael Lerner | December 6, 1999
A FEW days before the celebration of Hanukkah, tens of thousands of demonstrators in Seattle took up the modern banner of ancient guerrilla fighters. Though the terms of the struggle are different, it's really the same battle that Jews are celebrating during the eight-day period that began Friday. The struggle of Hanukkah was about the massive Greek empire and its Hellenistic culture that had taken over ancient Judea and attempted to subvert the independent right of the Jewish people to shape their own cultural, religious and political life.
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BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | March 28, 2007
If Alabama and Louisiana had to obey the economic rules applying to most of the world, 2,400 workers at the Sparrows Point steel mill might have one less thing less to worry about. ThyssenKrupp would buy the Point, spend big money on improvements and ensure it a long and prosperous future. The German company badly wants a decent steel mill on a North American deepwater harbor, and Sparrows Point in Baltimore County is the perfect choice. At least it was - until the governors of Alabama and Louisiana stepped up. They're bribing ThyssenKrupp with hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars to put a new plant in one of their states.
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NEWS
By Molly Ivins | November 30, 1999
AUSTIN, Texas -- Sorry to interrupt your busy week with a thumb-sucker on a serious topic, but this is important. The World Trade Organization meets in Seattle today, and the results will affect your life.In theory, everybody's in favor of free trade -- but. Everyone has a but.It helps if you think of the world on the eve of the 21st century as being like the United States on the brink of the 20th -- rampageous capitalism with no regulation.The decades it took this country to build labor rights, a social safety net and environmental protections -- all that has to be done again, on a global scale: labor rights, human rights and environmental health.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 28, 2007
DAVOS, Switzerland -- Leading trade ministers embraced an unusual game plan yesterday for reviving trade talks, saying they would try to hash out details on technical issues first, rather than agreeing on the broad outlines of an accord before negotiations resume. During a meeting at the World Economic Forum, officials from the United States, the European Union and emerging markets like India and Brazil vowed to move forward again in the Doha round of World Trade Organization talks, which began more than five years ago in the Persian Gulf emirate of Qatar but collapsed last July because of disagreements about farm subsidies and tariff cuts.
NEWS
By Jeremy Brecher and Brendan Smith | March 10, 2000
ADVOCATES OF President Clinton's deal to admit China to the World Trade Organization claim it will benefit the poorest people of China. It is far more likely to drive down already pitiful wages, create hundreds of millions of displaced workers and lead to still worse repression. Proponents of the deal argue that increased exports will raise living standards for Chinese workers. But the evidence suggests the opposite. The National Labor Committee, based in New York, and the cf03 China Labor Bulletin, cf01 based in Hong Kong, have discovered that production for export is already creating a "race to the bottom" within China as regions lower their labor costs to attract foreign capital.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2006
GENEVA --The chances of reaching a new accord to lower trade barriers across the globe seemed more remote than ever yesterday as major World Trade Organization powers signaled their failure to make progress during two days of talks and postponed a resumption of serious discussions. "The experience of the last several days has been somewhat disheartening," said Susan C. Schwab, the U.S. trade representative. Schwab's aides said she would return to the United States today. India's trade minister, Kamal Nath, left the meeting yesterday afternoon.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration yesterday said it would pursue a risky strategy of trying to enlist other countries in its quest to pry open Japan's markets for autos and automotive parts.U.S. Trade Representative Mickey Kantor said the administration would file a trade complaint against Japan with the World Trade Organization (WTO), while at the same time imposing separate U.S. tariffs on Japanese goods.Japan has threatened to retaliate by filing its own WTO complaint, which would create the first major test of the authority of the recently overhauled world trading system.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | August 4, 2004
IS KING COTTON, oppressor of the poor and striving, scheduled for the guillotine? It kind of looks that way. Last weekend's World Trade Organization deal mentions the crop 11 times, which is extraordinary. Trade communiques are usually vague, designed to offend as few special interests as possible. Yet the Geneva WTO accord, intended to help impoverished nations by cutting rich-country farm subsidies, names names and levels threats. The WTO "recognizes the importance of cotton for a certain number of countries and its vital importance for developing countries," says the agreement.
BUSINESS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 13, 1999
BEIJING -- In a surprise move, the United States and China are extending talks into a fourth day in an attempt to break the stalemate over Beijing's bid to enter the World Trade Organization."
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 2004
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The World Trade Organization has criticized the European Union's protections of the identities of regional products such as Parma ham and French champagne, saying the EU failed to grant similar protection to non-European items such as Florida orange juice, people close to the trade body said yesterday. In a preliminary report distributed only to governments, the WTO appeared to back a complaint filed by the United States and Australia in April last year against Europe's system of protecting the names of regional products.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 2, 2006
GENEVA --The chances of reaching a new accord to lower trade barriers across the globe seemed more remote than ever yesterday as major World Trade Organization powers signaled their failure to make progress during two days of talks and postponed a resumption of serious discussions. "The experience of the last several days has been somewhat disheartening," said Susan C. Schwab, the U.S. trade representative. Schwab's aides said she would return to the United States today. India's trade minister, Kamal Nath, left the meeting yesterday afternoon.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 2006
WASHINGTON --The heat on China is not letting up. In a rare coordinated move, the United States and the European Union filed a complaint yesterday with the World Trade Organization, accusing China of imposing discriminatory tariffs on foreign suppliers of auto parts. The action came 10 days before the beginning of a round of high-level trade talks between the United States and China, and less than three weeks before a visit to Washington by President Hu Jintao of China. Coming amid heightened concern over China's large and growing trade surpluses, the complaint was seen as part of a broader attempt to address the growing criticism against China's trade policies.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 22, 2005
WASHINGTON - As hundreds of Vietnamese-Americans protested outside the White House yesterday, President Bush welcomed Vietnam's prime minister to the Oval Office, praising the new relationship between the former enemy nations and announcing he'll visit communist Vietnam next year. Prime Minister Phan Van Khai is the highest-ranking Vietnamese official to visit the White House since the Vietnam War ended more than 30 years ago. He stopped in Washington as part of a six-day U.S. trip focused on Vietnam's economic development, including its application for membership in the World Trade Organization.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 1, 2005
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The United States and European Union sued each other at the World Trade Organization over subsidies to airplane makers Airbus SAS and Boeing Co., setting the stage for the biggest clash in the WTO's 10-year history. The EU asked the WTO yesterday to outlaw U.S. aid to Boeing, a day after the Bush administration revived its case against European government loans to Airbus. Boeing lost its lead as the world's top seller of commercial jets to Airbus two years ago. Boeing, which EU Trade Commissioner Peter Mandelson said was instrumental in pressuring the United States to lodge the complaint, is attacking Airbus "not because it fears subsidies, but because it fears competition," he told a Brussels news conference.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 2005
GENEVA - The World Trade Organization's highest court issued a final ruling yesterday ordering the European Union to stop dumping subsidized sugar illegally on global markets or face punishment. The decision by the WTO's appellate court in Geneva gave the European Union up to 15 months to bring itself into compliance with global trade rules. The panel rejected calls by Brazil, Thailand and Australia, which filed the original complaint, for a 90-day deadline to comply. The verdict was nonetheless another victory for Brazil, after Washington lost a similar appeal last month over its cotton subsidies.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2005
In the Region Southwest offering Movielink access to passengers Low-fare leader Southwest Airlines announced yesterday its response to rivals' moves to offer in-flight entertainment by offering its passengers access to Movielink, a broadband video-on-demand service. Through the airline's Web site, passengers can download any of thousands of movies onto their laptop computers with a high-speed Internet connection before their flights and play them back while traveling. Passengers new to Movielink will be provided with coupons valid for the first transaction and discounts throughout the year for other movies available on the Southwest site.
FEATURES
By Kevin Crust and Kevin Crust,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 8, 2004
Changing the world one prank at a time" is the tagline for the documentary The Yes Men, but the word prank doesn't really do them justice. Smart and amusing, the film is a record of activists Andy Bichlbaum and Mike Bonanno as they appeared at conferences around the world impersonating members of the World Trade Organization. We follow the Yes Men to Finland, Australia and Plattsburgh, N.Y., where, dressed in thrift store suits and armed with Powerpoint presentations, they aim to subvert corporate globalization while managing to have a good time.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 5, 1999
In the end, after the images of Seattle police in riot gear and masked anarchists fade from memory, Dan Seligman will remember this: that on a rainy day in November, a white guy from the Sierra Club stood shoulder to shoulder with an African-American union leader and a Latino farm worker and led a crowd 35,000 strong against global trade policies.They marched out of Memorial Stadium in Seattle united in their cause. Hard hats and environmentalists, family ranchers and the defenders of wildlife, clergy and consumer activists.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/ TRIBUNE | January 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - The European Union and the United States chose negotiation over litigation yesterday by agreeing to bilateral talks over subsidies to rival jet makers Airbus SAS and Boeing Co., avoiding for now a dispute that could have sparked a trade war. The trading partners said they would spend the next three months hammering out new guidelines on government assistance for large commercial aircraft, attempting to resolve the bitter dispute between Boeing...
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 2004
BRUSSELS, Belgium - The World Trade Organization has criticized the European Union's protections of the identities of regional products such as Parma ham and French champagne, saying the EU failed to grant similar protection to non-European items such as Florida orange juice, people close to the trade body said yesterday. In a preliminary report distributed only to governments, the WTO appeared to back a complaint filed by the United States and Australia in April last year against Europe's system of protecting the names of regional products.
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