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By New York Times News Service | August 25, 1994
NEW YORK -- Martina Navratilova won't be the first retired athlete to segue into politics, but she's probably the first to run against her longtime doubles partner.The post at stake in this curious competition is the presidency of the WTA Tour Players Association, a position held the past three years by Pam Shriver, of Lutherville, Md.At an election to be held Sunday night, Navratilova, an advocate of challenging the tennis establishment, will attempt to block Shriver's re-election bid. But Navratilova, who is retiring at the close of 1994, could find herself running unchallenged if Shriver is not first re-elected to the WTA Tour board by the players.
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By Preston Williams and The Washington Post | August 1, 2011
A familiar figure popped into the media tent Sunday afternoon at the Tennis Center at College Park, about 10 minutes after Nadia Petrova had discussed winning her first WTA championship in three years. The visitor? Petrova. Seems the Russian forgot to lug away the crystal vase she earned by dispatching top-seeded Shahar Peer, 7-5, 6-2, to win the Citi Open, a first-year event. With no singles title since 2008, second-seeded Petrova had not been accustomed to leaving events with heavy hardware.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1995
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- When Monica Seles stopped playing professional tennis after being stabbed during a tournament in Germany more than two years ago, women's tennis lost its sizzle.Gone from the scene was the giggling teen-ager who provided Steffi Graf with her biggest challenge. Gone was the bright young star who would change her hair color on a whim and give the game the panache it needed to generate interest.Gone was the WTA Tour's most dominant player, its No. 1 player."No matter how great a sport is, it needs superstars," said WTA Tour president Martina Navratilova.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
A $220,000 WTA tournament will be held July 25-31 at Troy Park Tennis and Sports Center, the newly approved state-of-the-art complex being developed just off Interstate95 near U.S. 1 in Elkridge. Troy Park, a multi-use athletic park that will include 30 tennis courts, 12 of them indoor, is a seven-year dream pursued by Art Tollick, president of the Howard County Tennis Patrons. Tollick saw his dream turn to reality 26 days ago when he and Howard County Executive Ken Ulman signed a 40-year lease agreement.
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By SUSAN REIMER | February 28, 1995
As a professional tennis player, Pam Shriver would not have felt a bit shy taking prize money from the makers of Tampax tampons.But as a broadcaster for ESPN and ABC, she wasn't sure how long it would be before she stopped stumbling in self-consciousness over the words: "The Tambrands WTA Tour.""I felt like maybe we would have gotten past the funny jokes at the start and then gotten on with business," says Shriver."But then, women's tennis is coming off two really controversial years. Maybe it's best not to be on the cutting edge of a new concept right now."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1994
NEW YORK -- The Women's Tennis Council has agreed in principle to the major recommendations of the Age Eligibility Commission that would prevent young players from competing in a full, unrestricted professional tour until age 18 and prevent any participation on the WTA Tour and at championship events until age 16."Until a kid is 16, she's not going to be in the big time," said Baltimore's Elise Burgin, who with Pam Shriver represents the tour players on the council. "The show will go on without them."
SPORTS
By Preston Williams and The Washington Post | August 1, 2011
A familiar figure popped into the media tent Sunday afternoon at the Tennis Center at College Park, about 10 minutes after Nadia Petrova had discussed winning her first WTA championship in three years. The visitor? Petrova. Seems the Russian forgot to lug away the crystal vase she earned by dispatching top-seeded Shahar Peer, 7-5, 6-2, to win the Citi Open, a first-year event. With no singles title since 2008, second-seeded Petrova had not been accustomed to leaving events with heavy hardware.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2010
A $220,000 WTA tournament will be held July 25-31 at Troy Park Tennis and Sports Center, the newly approved state-of-the-art complex being developed just off Interstate95 near U.S. 1 in Elkridge. Troy Park, a multi-use athletic park that will include 30 tennis courts, 12 of them indoor, is a seven-year dream pursued by Art Tollick, president of the Howard County Tennis Patrons. Tollick saw his dream turn to reality 26 days ago when he and Howard County Executive Ken Ulman signed a 40-year lease agreement.
SPORTS
April 9, 2007
AMELIA ISLAND, Fla. -- Tatiana Golovin beat Nadia Petrova, 6-2, 6-1, yesterday for her first WTA Tour singles title at the Bausch & Lomb Championships at the Amelia Island Plantation. Golovin was appearing in her fourth championship match but had been runner-up in each of the three previous finals. This time, there was no denying the French teenager. Golovin answered nearly all of top-seeded Petrova's booming but erratic serves and most of her blistering ground strokes. But her best tactic was to wait until the defending champion made one of her 27 unforced errors.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | August 21, 2010
Beatrice Capra , who grew up in Ellicott City and attended McDonogh, won the U.S. Open wild-card playoff in Boca Raton, Fla., and will receive a main-draw singles wild card into the event Aug. 30-Sept. 12 in New York. Capra, 18, upset No. 1 seed Madison Brengle , 7-6 (4), 6-4. She entered the top 10 of the world junior rankings this year with a title at the Italian Open and a quarterfinal showing at the Roland Garros juniors. Capra was a quarterfinalist at the U.S. Open juniors in 2009, the same year she won her first pro singles title on the USTA Pro Circuit at the $10,000 event in Williamsburg, Va. She is No. 369 on the WTA Tour.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1995
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- When Monica Seles stopped playing professional tennis after being stabbed during a tournament in Germany more than two years ago, women's tennis lost its sizzle.Gone from the scene was the giggling teen-ager who provided Steffi Graf with her biggest challenge. Gone was the bright young star who would change her hair color on a whim and give the game the panache it needed to generate interest.Gone was the WTA Tour's most dominant player, its No. 1 player."No matter how great a sport is, it needs superstars," said WTA Tour president Martina Navratilova.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 28, 1995
As a professional tennis player, Pam Shriver would not have felt a bit shy taking prize money from the makers of Tampax tampons.But as a broadcaster for ESPN and ABC, she wasn't sure how long it would be before she stopped stumbling in self-consciousness over the words: "The Tambrands WTA Tour.""I felt like maybe we would have gotten past the funny jokes at the start and then gotten on with business," says Shriver."But then, women's tennis is coming off two really controversial years. Maybe it's best not to be on the cutting edge of a new concept right now."
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1994
NEW YORK -- The Women's Tennis Council has agreed in principle to the major recommendations of the Age Eligibility Commission that would prevent young players from competing in a full, unrestricted professional tour until age 18 and prevent any participation on the WTA Tour and at championship events until age 16."Until a kid is 16, she's not going to be in the big time," said Baltimore's Elise Burgin, who with Pam Shriver represents the tour players on the council. "The show will go on without them."
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | August 25, 1994
NEW YORK -- Martina Navratilova won't be the first retired athlete to segue into politics, but she's probably the first to run against her longtime doubles partner.The post at stake in this curious competition is the presidency of the WTA Tour Players Association, a position held the past three years by Pam Shriver, of Lutherville, Md.At an election to be held Sunday night, Navratilova, an advocate of challenging the tennis establishment, will attempt to block Shriver's re-election bid. But Navratilova, who is retiring at the close of 1994, could find herself running unchallenged if Shriver is not first re-elected to the WTA Tour board by the players.
SPORTS
By SUN-SENTINEL, SOUTH FLORIDA | May 24, 1998
PARIS -- Monica Seles, whose father, Karolj, died of cancer May 14, has alerted the Corel WTA Tour by fax that she intends to play in the French Open, which will begin tomorrow.Seeded sixth, Seles will play Annabel Ellwood of Australia in the first round and probably seek a Tuesday start.Seles, who won the French Open in 1990, 1991 and 1992, has played only 12 matches this year, winning eight.At her father's urging, she played the Italian Open on May 4-10, where she defeated Silvia Farina and lost in the second round to Sandrine Testud.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 1999
NEW YORK -- Tired of receiving second-class treatment on the payrolls of three of the sport's four Grand Slams, the women who make their living from professional tennis may resort to a boycott to bite the hand that feeds them -- but feeds the men more -- if the three shallow-pocketed Slams don't make a millennial motion toward equality.Billie Jean King calls it a potential "girl-cott." Bart McGuire, the WTA Tour's chief executive officer, calls it a militant maneuver he hopes his troops won't deploy.
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