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By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 21, 1996
WASHINGTON -- There are many ways the Democrats can rationalize the better-than-expected bounce Bob Dole has enjoyed in the opinion polls taken immediately after the Republican convention.But there are some undercurrents in the polls that President Clinton and his supporters should see as warning signs of potential vulnerability in the general election campaign.That Mr. Dole scored heavily, however transitorily, is unquestioned. One television network survey shows Mr. Clinton's margin cut essentially in half, to about 12 percent.
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NEWS
By Betsy Johnson | January 22, 2014
With climate disruption increasingly affecting Maryland's priceless environmental treasures, it's time the federal government stopped bargaining with our natural resources and started protecting our future as it looks to import and export more resources overseas. The Trans-Pacific Partnership - a massive trade pact between the U.S. and 11 countries along the Pacific Rim - could result in more environmental degradation, job loss, and more dangerous fracking affecting nearly every aspect of our lives, from the quality of our water to the quality of our jobs.
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NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND and JULES WITCOVER | April 15, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In the strange presidential campaign of 1996, President Clinton held a small ceremony in the White House Rose Garden the other day to reiterate his support for reforms in pension laws.It was the kind of media event so lacking in news that it received only perfunctory attention from the television networks and newspapers for whom it was intended. And you have to wonder if many of the voters the president was targeting ever became aware of the proposals.But Mr. Clinton and his strategists were focused on a critical problem for the White House in the campaign ahead -- how to allay the economic concerns of American workers at a time when all the usual economic indicators are favorable.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
Both Towson University and Johns Hopkins University - via their administrations and student government associations - are on the wrong side of the inclusion and diversity issues once again, and for the very same reasons, too: intolerance of viewpoints other than their own, partisan politics, and downright stupidity. In the case of Towson University, it has done everything possible to deny a projected white student union the right to form on campus - backed by its SGA - and this flying in the face of the fact that, as it admits, two-thirds of the current student body is - you guessed it!
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | January 29, 1992
An irritating survey of public opinion has just come to hand.The press release begins: ''Not since 1980 have voters been this pessimistic about the country entering into a presidential election year.''The handout continues: ''With nearly three-quarters of Americans (73 percent) saying the country is headed off on the wrong track, the mood of the country is back to the depth of pessimism measured in October 1990 (19 percent right direction, 79 percent wrong track) . . . ''What about it? The survey comes from Public Opinion Strategies of Alexandria, Virginia.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | February 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- If there is one political lesson in the dilemma of the Republican Party today, it is that message is critical.This is a lesson that campaign strategists understand and teach to their candidates although not one that all candidates are able to accept.But it is glaringly apparent that Pat Buchanan has become a major force in the competition for the Republican nomination, despite all the baggage he carries, because he has sent a message that a significant segment of the electorate understands.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The notion that President Clinton is in danger of meltdown only four months into his four-year term is, on the face of it, a little extravagant. Clinton has always been a tenacious and resourceful politician capable of learning from his mistakes.And it should not be forgotten that those who are saying the sky is falling are the same people who were saying two years ago that George Bush was politically invulnerable.It is equally true, nonetheless, that the new president has reached a critical point in defining his administration.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2004
WASHINGTON -- On the face of it, the 2004 presidential campaign is going down to its final days close enough to feed widespread speculation about the possibility of deadlock and perhaps prolonged litigation. Each party has legions of lawyers at the ready. But some astute political professionals believe either President Bush or Democrat Sen. John Kerry could win a comfortable -- perhaps even one-sided -- margin in the Electoral College if not the popular vote. This could happen, they suggest, if even a minor development in the news of the day or the campaign reaches a small bloc of voters whose commitment to their candidate is tentative.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 26, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The notion that President Clinton is in danger of meltdown only four months into his four-year term is, on the face of it, a little extravagant. Clinton has always been a tenacious and resourceful politician capable of learning from his mistakes.And it should not be forgotten that those who are saying the sky is falling are the same people who were saying two years ago that George Bush was politically invulnerable.It is equally true, nonetheless, that the new president has reached a critical point in defining his administration.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Washington Bureau | August 1, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In political terms, the most significant thing about the bad economic news reported this week is the timing. The disclosure that the economy grew at a rate of only 1.4 percent in the second quarter of the year -- the administration had forecast 2 percent -- means that there isn't time for a recovery soon enough to save President Bush's bacon.The Republicans had based their campaign planning on the premise that the economy would bounce back this year at least enough to neutralize the issue.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 17, 2011
President Barack Obama doesn't suffer from amnesia, but apparently he hopes the public does. In his latest in a series of interviews on "60 Minutes" this week, the president took positions that are the polar opposite of what he was saying as recently as last spring. One wishes all of those "fact-checkers" who point out supposed mistakes by the Republican candidates were as committed to noting even worse flaws in the president's promises. In his interview with Steve Kroft, the president said he always believed that reversing the culture in Washington "was gonna take more than one term.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | August 22, 2011
Don't panic. That's what Wall Street is telling Main Street. Those same guys who are photographed almost daily with their faces buried in their hands - there is even an Internet photo gallery called "The Brokers With Hands on Their Faces Blog" - are telling us not to panic. So, I have been wondering. What does "don't panic" mean? If we shouldn't panic when the Dow drops 600 points in a single day, when, exactly, should we panic? When it drops 400 points the next day?
NEWS
By Haviland Smith | January 25, 2008
America needs to develop a rational policy for dealing with terrorism. Almost everything we are doing today is counterproductive. Our actions and attitudes create more radical Muslim terrorists and encourage moderate Muslim passivity toward those terrorists and their operations. Let us accept, for a moment, as true the Bush administration's claim that the techniques and tools that diminish our civil liberties at home and our reputation abroad are worth it because they have stopped terrorist attacks.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | September 2, 2007
Despite modest gains by her chief opponent, Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon maintains a dominating lead ahead of this month's Democratic primary, a new poll for The Sun shows. Her opponents have attacked her ethics and have blamed her for this year's staggering increase in homicides, but Dixon's large lead has barely eroded - though an increasing percentage of voters do say that they have an unfavorable impression of her. With nine days until the Sept. 11 election, Dixon leads City Councilman Keiffer J. Mitchell Jr. by 46 percent to 19 percent - a 27 percentage-point spread - according to the poll conducted by OpinionWorks, an independent Annapolis-based firm.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2004
WASHINGTON -- On the face of it, the 2004 presidential campaign is going down to its final days close enough to feed widespread speculation about the possibility of deadlock and perhaps prolonged litigation. Each party has legions of lawyers at the ready. But some astute political professionals believe either President Bush or Democrat Sen. John Kerry could win a comfortable -- perhaps even one-sided -- margin in the Electoral College if not the popular vote. This could happen, they suggest, if even a minor development in the news of the day or the campaign reaches a small bloc of voters whose commitment to their candidate is tentative.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and JoAnna Daemmrich and David Nitkin and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2004
Maryland voters overwhelmingly feel that the nation is veering in the wrong direction and support Sen. John Kerry in his race against President Bush by 56 percent to 39 percent, according to a poll conducted for The Sun and released today. Disaffected by the war in Iraq and troubled by terrorism, the economy and the president's leadership, 62 percent of Marylanders surveyed this week said the country was on the wrong track, compared with 34 percent who said things were on the right path.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 4, 1993
DALLAS -- It is always risky and often dead wrong to see any election as a referendum on national issues. Most voters don't cast their ballots to send a message but instead to choose among the rascals they are being offered on the ballot that day.That fact of political life does not mean, however, that the outcome of the special Senate election here won't be interpreted as a referendum on President Clinton -- particularly if, as expected, Republican Kay...
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The White House has been reveling in the 234 votes President Clinton captured in the House to pass the North American Free Trade Agreement. In the long run, however, there is much more reason for the administration to be encouraged by the new economic numbers.The decline in the unemployment rate from 6.8 percent to 6.4 percent last month, the steepest in a decade, coupled with the rise of 208,000 in non-farm jobs suggests the kind of movement toward economic health that is far more important politically than Clinton's success on NAFTA.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2003
The wrecking ball began swinging its way two weeks ago through the old wooden, steel and glass grandstand at Bowie Race Course, where for 71 drama-filled years horseplayers cheered winners and mourned losers. Perfect Park, ironically, won the last race before 12,012 racing fans at the Prince George's County race track, which closed on July 13, 1985. While departing fans were serenaded over the public address system by a recording of Guy Lombardo's "Thanks for The Memories," the infield board flashed its final message: "Bowie: 1914-1985.
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