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NEWS
July 6, 2012
Why would anyone wish to become President of the United States? The responsibility of leading a nation of over 330 million souls, the burden of sending our brave and finest into harms way, the fortitude to withstand the barbs of the opposition are but a few items in the job description. With this in mind in the current election cycle, I have observed President Barack Obama and his all-but-certain opponent Gov. Mitt Romney, their utterances and their body language while on the stump throughout the nation.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
The 21-year-old man Baltimore officials had called a suspect in the killing of 3-year-old McKenzie Elliott was released from jail Wednesday after two months without being charged in the fatal shooting. Asked whether the man is still considered a person of interest in the case, the Baltimore Police Department released a statement saying the investigation "has shifted. " "We have substantial leads that we are continuing to follow," the statement read. Officials declined to elaborate.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 22, 2012
The complaint that those of us who frequently refer to the nation's breathtaking disparity in wealth and income and to its 46 million poor are engaging in "class warfare" usually comes from people, like Mitt Romney, who live in the highest end of American class structure. They always throw the red flags. "I think it's dangerous, this class warfare," Mr. Romney said of the Occupy Wall Street protests last fall. Campaigning toward yesterday's presidential primary in South Carolina, he accused Newt Gingrich, a fellow multimillionaire, of sowing "class warfare" with his criticisms of Mr. Romney's legacy at Bain Capital.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 13, 2014
Having recently interviewed the British statistician David Hand about probability principles, I suppose I should be willing to accept the following: Two men named James Elmer Bailey, both born on Oct. 15, 1962, resided in the Annapolis area at the time a woman accused one of them of punching her in the face. Hard as that might be to comprehend, probability theorists like Hand say that such a thing is far more likely than most of us believe. Among their many remarkable findings: Only 23 people need assemble in a room before it becomes more than 50 percent probable that two of them have the same birth date.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
The carefully planned robbery and beating were supposed to be payback for stealing pills and cash from a drug dealer. But there was a glitch. When police apprehended the first of four men charged in the Severna Park ambush, he admitted that they'd robbed the wrong man, said Anne Arundel County prosecutor Michael J. Dunty. On Tuesday, Brian Keith Andrzejewski, 35, pleaded guilty to robbery. Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner sentenced him to four years in prison, followed by five years of supervised probation, while the victim, a community college student, and his family, watched.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Nancy A. Youssef,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1999
Two weeks after arresting a Virginia man in a December killing in North Laurel, police acknowledged yesterday that the wrong man was charged, and they are looking for a new suspect, who they believe used the Virginia man's name as an alias. Officials had charged Dwayne West Williams, 28, of Portsmouth with first-degree murder in the Dec. 10 death of Donald Ray Mitchell, 43, of Columbia, who was visiting friends in North Laurel. Mitchell was shot once in the chest during an argument.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | November 24, 1992
Continuing to insist that federal agents and a federal jury had nailed the wrong man, a Nigerian was sentenced yesterday to 40 years in prison for his conviction on drug smuggling charges.The man sobbed and flailed his arms as he begged U.S. District Judge John R. Hargrove to believe that his was a case of mistaken identity. The Nigerian insisted that he is Charles Onwauzombe, and not Ebele Onwuazor, who federal prosecutors say conspired to ship millions of dollars worth of heroin into the United States.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
An attorney for an 18-year-old man charged with attempted murder in one of two shootings that stunned Harper's Choice in September said yesterday that the state arrested the wrong man.In opening statements, the prosecution said Robert Joseph Manning fired a sawed-off shotgun and seriously wounded John Gordon Jackson, 38, just before 2 a.m. Sept. 21 near Jackson's apartment on Harpers Farm Road. Defense attorney Richard Bernhardt said another man was the shooter.Jackson, a disabled Army veteran, was shot about 24 hours after a 17-year-old boy was robbed and shot in the abdomen a block and a half away.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
An attorney for an 18-year-old man charged with attempted murder in one of two shootings that stunned Harper's Choice last September said yesterday the state arrested the wrong man.In opening statements, the prosecution said Robert Joseph Manning fired a sawed-off shotgun and seriously wounded John Gordon Jackson, 38, just before 2 a.m. on Sept. 21 near Jackson's apartment on Harpers Farm Road. But defense attorney Richard Bernhardt named another man as the shooter.Jackson, a disabled Army veteran, was shot about 24 hours after a 17-year-old boy was robbed and shot in the abdomen a block and a half away -- a crime for which another defendant is scheduled to go on trial.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 8, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush tapped John R. Bolton, a blunt-talking administration conservative who has been sharply critical of the United Nations, yesterday as the next U.S. ambassador to the world body. Democrats quickly reacted against the nomination, saying Bolton was the wrong man for the U.N. post at a time when the United States was seeking to mend fences with longtime allies after a period of disaffection resulting from the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq and other disagreements. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice announced the selection at a brief State Department ceremony, calling Bolton "a tough-minded diplomat" with a proven track record of success, and comparing him to two of the more colorful and outspoken Americans who have held the U.N. post, Jeanne J. Kirkpatrick and the late Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 13, 2013
You have to wonder what kind of fun Vatican mystery writer Dan Brown would have with the startling resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. As would be the case when any well-known CEO suddenly steps down "for health reasons," we are immediately suspicious. Was he, like the last pope to step down voluntarily more than 700 years ago, simply the wrong man for the job? A shy and aging scholar overwhelmed by the demands of guiding the church through the scandals of sex abuse and money laundering, who was happier in the library than on the balcony at St. Peter's?
NEWS
July 6, 2012
Why would anyone wish to become President of the United States? The responsibility of leading a nation of over 330 million souls, the burden of sending our brave and finest into harms way, the fortitude to withstand the barbs of the opposition are but a few items in the job description. With this in mind in the current election cycle, I have observed President Barack Obama and his all-but-certain opponent Gov. Mitt Romney, their utterances and their body language while on the stump throughout the nation.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | January 22, 2012
The complaint that those of us who frequently refer to the nation's breathtaking disparity in wealth and income and to its 46 million poor are engaging in "class warfare" usually comes from people, like Mitt Romney, who live in the highest end of American class structure. They always throw the red flags. "I think it's dangerous, this class warfare," Mr. Romney said of the Occupy Wall Street protests last fall. Campaigning toward yesterday's presidential primary in South Carolina, he accused Newt Gingrich, a fellow multimillionaire, of sowing "class warfare" with his criticisms of Mr. Romney's legacy at Bain Capital.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
The carefully planned robbery and beating were supposed to be payback for stealing pills and cash from a drug dealer. But there was a glitch. When police apprehended the first of four men charged in the Severna Park ambush, he admitted that they'd robbed the wrong man, said Anne Arundel County prosecutor Michael J. Dunty. On Tuesday, Brian Keith Andrzejewski, 35, pleaded guilty to robbery. Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner sentenced him to four years in prison, followed by five years of supervised probation, while the victim, a community college student, and his family, watched.
NEWS
By Marcia Kuntz & Julie Millican | October 30, 2009
Rush Limbaugh has once again found himself the subject of national attention, this time for his failed bid to become a part owner of the National Football League's St. Louis Rams. After the world was reminded of Mr. Limbaugh's history of racially charged commentary, the group trying to buy the team rightly realized that Mr. Limbaugh's involvement in the effort could cripple their chances. Rush was dropped - which is exactly how he should be treated by the Miss America Pageant. Mr. Limbaugh is slated to be a Miss America judge in 2010, in spite of the deep-seated misogyny that he has broadcast nationwide throughout his career.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | September 12, 2008
A Northeast Baltimore man was convicted yesterday of attempting to murder another man he believed cheated him of $2 during a craps game. A Baltimore jury convicted Jamal Smith, 20, of the 1800 block of E. Federal St. of shooting Clinton Anderson, 38, in the head from about two feet away in the early morning of June 7, 2007. Clinton is in a vegetative state at Johns Hopkins Hospital and is not expected to recover, Assistant State's Attorney Tonya LaPolla said. The case took several twists worthy of a TV crime drama before Smith was convicted.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 26, 1991
* ''Deceived'' A mystery thriller with Goldie Hawn as a woman who may have married the wrong man. John Heard is the man she weds.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 20, 2001
The power of DNA tests to finger the guilty hasn't been lost on the bad guys. Some DNA-savvy suspects have taken unusual steps to ensure that they leave no biological evidence at the scene of a crime - or that they leave someone else's. Take Anthony H. Turner, a convicted serial rapist from Milwaukee who is serving a 120-year prison term. He went to great lengths to convince investigators that they had the wrong man. Police arrested Turner during a burglary in 1997. A rape victim identified him as her attacker, and Turner's DNA profile, taken from a blood sample, matched the suspect's in two other rapes.
NEWS
September 11, 2008
3 teens pick wrong victim; one is seized, two sought Three teenagers picked the wrong man to rob Monday night in an alley in West Baltimore. One was arrested, and police were seeking the other two. Police said the man was sitting in his parked car in the 100 block of S. Mount St. when he was approached by three teenage boys who talked to him about drugs and asked the man to meet them in an alley behind nearby Lemmon Street. There, police said, one of the boys brandished what appeared to be a small-caliber handgun and demanded the man's money.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 8, 2007
washington -- The Supreme Court is set to decide as early as tomorrow whether the government can invoke the doctrine of "state secrets" to quash a legal claim from an apparently innocent victim of bungling by the CIA that resulted in his being abducted, imprisoned and tortured. Only after five months of such treatment did CIA agents seem to realize that the man in custody, Khaled el-Masri, a German citizen of Lebanese descent, was not the wanted terrorist Khalid al-Masri. The case has attracted wide public attention in Europe, but el-Masri has been unable to gain a court hearing in the United States because, at least so far, the government has successfully invoked the argument that it cannot be taken to court when doing so might expose "state secrets."
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