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By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2011
For Demetrios "Dimitri" Fotos, the challenge could not have felt more natural. An Annapolis photographer, he learned the power of reading as a child when his father took dozens of adult-education courses at St. John's College. Yet it was the visual arts Dimitri fell in love with at age 13, and that passion has never waned. So when organizers at the Mitchell Gallery at St. John's told him of their latest plan — to stage an exhibit for which artists would create works "inspired by books" — his mind went off like a strobe flash.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2011
For Demetrios "Dimitri" Fotos, the challenge could not have felt more natural. An Annapolis photographer, he learned the power of reading as a child when his father took dozens of adult-education courses at St. John's College. Yet it was the visual arts Dimitri fell in love with at age 13, and that passion has never waned. So when organizers at the Mitchell Gallery at St. John's told him of their latest plan — to stage an exhibit for which artists would create works "inspired by books" — his mind went off like a strobe flash.
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NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 13, 2001
THE NEWS ABOUT Bibelot books arrives like a death blow to the culture. The area's biggest independent book and music seller files for bankruptcy and its owners announce they will close all four stores within 90 days. But any autopsy should include this inquiry: Is this another death blow for literature, or merely for business? In either case, it hurts. It hurts any time a business folds, because it means people are losing jobs, and once-hopeful owners are losing an investment, and every home and every business in the surrounding neighborhoods ultimately feels some fallout.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 15, 2008
Where do they find the time? My colleagues here and elsewhere undoubtedly have the talent, but I'm most amazed that they can carve out the time to write thoughtful, revealing sports biographies. A decent-sized sports biography is going to run about 80,000 words - that's about 79,250 words longer than a typical newspaper column. It's just not fathomable to me how they find the time to research and construct thoughtful prose in a big, beautiful 80,000-word package. Luckily, I no longer have to worry about that.
NEWS
September 27, 1996
OVER THE YEARS, Baltimore has produced an impressive array of writers, ranging from poets and novelists to scholars. That's why the Baltimore Book Festival -- Saturday and Sunday around Mount Vernon Place -- is such a wonderful concept. The free program will feature readings by local authors, a wide variety of music, cooking demonstrations and, of course, victuals of various sorts and imagination.For more than eight years, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has touted Baltimore as "The City That Reads."
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 8, 1993
Three signs the written word is not dead: You're reading thi column, Vic Gold is screaming about "videocy" -- rhymes with "idiocy" -- and some third-graders in Massachusetts have become authors.First, about the kids. During my recent vacation, I was invited to their school to answer questions about writing. Their teachers had given them hardbound blank books with clean, white pages between clean, white covers, and ordered them to write. And the kids went nuts on the project, trying to outdo one another with story line, character development, plots and illustrations.
NEWS
By Douglas P. Bruns | March 25, 1992
Words are all we have.-- Samuel Beckett THE MECHANICS of reading follow roughly along these lines: The cones and rods of the eye are struck by photons of light reflected off the words on the page. This activity, transmitted by way of the optic nerve, is received as a hail of electrical blips somewhere in the lobes of the brain. A neural string of cells explodes, registering and triggering a response. Somehow, understanding, or cognition, results.That, of course, is an approximate rendering of the process.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | April 30, 2007
One can understand why Howard Dean feels that the world would be better off without the press, as he suggested recently to a group of bankers. Mr. Dean, the Democratic National Committee chairman, was responding to a banker's complaint that candidates speak only in sound bites. His solution: "Have candidates in to meetings like this and bar the press." Now there's a concept from a man who should know. Few have benefited less from media exposure than Mr. Dean, who will be forever remembered as "The Scream" for his war whoop during his 2004 presidential election bid. Then again, Mr. Dean of all people should also know that citizen journalists are everywhere, even at banking conventions, and that nearly everybody has a videophone and access to YouTube.
BUSINESS
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,London Bureau | February 29, 1992
LONDON -- While both sides of the Atlantic are gripped in recession, Dr. Lynne Agress' small but profitable Baltimore-based company, Business Writing at its Best Inc., is busy dotting its i's and crossing its t's.The recession has motivated Dr. Agress to "reach out more" for clients. In the decade she has been in business, the former college English professor has expanded about half of her business beyond the Baltimore region. She is hiring two managers, one for New York and one for Washington, D.C., where they will hire instructors and sell the program.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 14, 1993
Ninety million adult Americans are pronounced deficient in reading and writing skills, and we're shocked? Not me. I think I knew most of those Americans when they were in college.For much of a decade, I taught mass communications at a local university which shall not be named here, except to say it's located on York Road in the heart of Towson. I don't blame the school. I'm not sure I blame the kids, either. But the simple truth is: They had literacy skills which made me fear for the future of the written word.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA | December 16, 2007
In the commercial, local musician Jenn Wasner stands in front of a superimposed photo backdrop of a bonfire, stares straight into the camera and says: "I'm going because I believe in the power of the written word ... on fire." Got your attention yet? Conceptualized and written by local musician Jason Dove, the roughly minute-long film featured a cast of Baltimore bands tearing pages out of books and lighting them on fire. It was shot strictly for Internet viewers - uploaded onto YouTube and posted on a few local bands' Web sites.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | April 30, 2007
One can understand why Howard Dean feels that the world would be better off without the press, as he suggested recently to a group of bankers. Mr. Dean, the Democratic National Committee chairman, was responding to a banker's complaint that candidates speak only in sound bites. His solution: "Have candidates in to meetings like this and bar the press." Now there's a concept from a man who should know. Few have benefited less from media exposure than Mr. Dean, who will be forever remembered as "The Scream" for his war whoop during his 2004 presidential election bid. Then again, Mr. Dean of all people should also know that citizen journalists are everywhere, even at banking conventions, and that nearly everybody has a videophone and access to YouTube.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr. and Leonard Pitts Jr.,The Miami Herald | June 5, 2005
WASHINGTON - Dear Chris Cecil: Here's how you write a newspaper column. First, you find a topic that engages you. Then you spend a few hours banging your head against a computer screen until what you've written there no longer makes you want to hurl. Or you could just wait till somebody else writes a column and then steal it. That's what you've been doing on a regular basis. Before Tuesday, I had never heard of you or The Daily Tribune News of Cartersville, Ga., where you are associate managing editor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2002
Everybody knows that Microsoft rarely innovates. You know the knock. While companies such as Apple Computer roll out bold and original hardware and software products, Microsoft relies on tweaks to its world-dominant Windows software. Of course, there's something to be said for this approach. Rather than launch some radical product, why not add a heap of features to a product that already has a loyal user base tens of millions deep? That's the philosophy that guided Microsoft in the development of its upcoming Tablet PC technology.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 7, 2001
On a map, the shortest distance between two points is a straight line. But on the round surface of the globe, the quickest way from one place to another follows the curve of a great circle. That is the very route taken by Maria Anasazi in her artist's book, World Bound, one of 20 immensely intriguing works that will be on display at Evergreen House through Feb. 28. The show, somewhat whimsically titled "Kings, Hummingbirds & Monsters: Artist's Books at Evergreen," is a tribute to the 30,000-odd volumes collected by B&O Railroad magnate and indefatigable bibliophile T. Harrison Garrett and his son, John Work Garrett.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | March 13, 2001
THE NEWS ABOUT Bibelot books arrives like a death blow to the culture. The area's biggest independent book and music seller files for bankruptcy and its owners announce they will close all four stores within 90 days. But any autopsy should include this inquiry: Is this another death blow for literature, or merely for business? In either case, it hurts. It hurts any time a business folds, because it means people are losing jobs, and once-hopeful owners are losing an investment, and every home and every business in the surrounding neighborhoods ultimately feels some fallout.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | October 26, 1997
TEST ROBERT Mueller's reading skills by the usual, timed methods and you will conclude, as many of his teachers surely did, that he isn't very smart.Now 44, Mr. Mueller had his reading abilities tested again in 1994, and found that he landed in the bottom 5 percent of college seniors in his reading comprehension. Untimed, his scores soared to the high average and superior range.Should he be denied the opportunity to practice law? The New York Times reported last week on Mr. Mueller's case against the California committee of bar examiners, one of many such lawsuits that are helping redefine the nation's approach to disabilities -- and, not insignificantly, also expanding its understanding of diversity.
NEWS
By ROSEMARY KLEIN and ROSEMARY KLEIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1996
Some 50 years ago, the great poet Theodore Roethke wrote "My heart keeps open house, My doors are widely swung." And so it is here in Baltimore that the community of poetry keeps a continuous open house, its doors widely swung to an ever-swelling audience of practitioners, participants, readers and listeners.A couple of years ago, Joe Somoza, a professor at New Mexico State University, traveled America, reading his poems. At the end of his year-long tour, he concluded that the most receptive cities to the charms of poetry were Portland, San Francisco, New York, Chicago and Baltimore.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2000
"A dream come true" is how Rheda Becker describes being invited by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra to narrate "Peter and the Wolf" more than 25 years ago. The longtime narrator of the BSO's children's concerts recalls that even as a little girl, "I had an enormous love of music," and "Peter and the Wolf" was a favorite. "I thought, `I would love to be the person who told the story.' " She's now been telling that story - along with musical settings of "The Story of Babar," "Green Eggs and Ham" and "Tubby the Tuba" - to two generations of young concertgoers and their parents at the popular concert series.
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