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By BUSTER OLNEY | May 14, 1995
This is a place for second-guessing. Orioles general manager Roland Hemond gets second-guessed. Bud Selig and Donald Fehr get second-guessed. Managers get second-guessed.But, in fairness, much of what has been written here can and should be second-guessed. The preseason predictions, for example. For many examples, actually.It was written: Philadelphia will be terrible in '95, and in particular its defense will be terrible.With 20-20 hindsight, that was about as close to reality as that Chicago Tribune headline -- DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN -- in 1948.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
For reporters, writing online must seem like admission to heaven. No space limits, no damn copy editor ruthlessly cutting forty lines of burnished prose to make it fit the page. Little interference from an editor, or even, bless us and save us, no editor at all .  Unfortunately, the online writer falls victim to the same fallacy entertained by the print writer: Because it's published , people read my stuff.* A couple of days ago, Craig Schmidt, formerly of the Star-Ledger , posted this comment on Facebook to the link to my post "Wait, wait, don't hang all the editors" : "What we've really lost -- especially online -- is making every word count.
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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 2005
ATLANTA - Fifty letters handwritten by Gen. William T. Sherman during his Civil War campaign to capture and destroy Atlanta were displayed Monday at the Atlanta History Center, which is seeking $400,000 from private donors to purchase the collection. It includes floridly written orders Sherman wrote to his generals during the 1864 campaign. In one, he threatens to shoot his men for shirking their duty: "The only proper fate of such miscreants is that they be shot as common enemies to their profession and country, and all officers and patriots sent to arrest them will shoot them without mercy on the slightest impudence or resistance."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 8, 2014
As the crystal ball on the 2016 Republican presidential nomination remains cloudy, two-time loser Mitt Romney appears willing at least to entertain the possibility of trying a third time. In addition to occasional comments on matters he knows a lot about, including setting up a health care insurance plan (in Massachusetts) and how to create jobs as well as personal wealth, Mr. Romney has now put on a hat as a defense and foreign policy expert. It's a weapon in his arsenal that he conspicuously lacked in 2012, when he made a mid-campaign trip to Europe and succeeded chiefly ruffling local feathers in Britain, Israel and Poland.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1995
The weekly computer column by Sun staff writer Michael J. Himowitz, which has been published in the Monday Business section, is no longer being written. A new computer column, written by Peter H. Lewis of the New York Times, begins today on Page 12C.
ENTERTAINMENT
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS | February 9, 2006
Lonestar Equipped with the most artistic freedom it's ever had, Lonestar hits the road again to tour in support of its current release, Let's Be Us Again. With all but one song written or co-written by band members on their 13-track disc, these crooning Southern gentlemen perform Sunday night at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. The show starts at 8 p.m. and tickets are $32.50 and $42.50. Call 410-547-SEAT or go to ticketmaster.com.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2002
Ana Garcia-Moreno spent three days carefully crafting a composition about her grandparents - how much they mean to her and the activities she likes to share with them. But the exercise wasn't over when the writing stopped. There were corrections to be made - an important part of the writing process at the Calvert School. So 8-year-old Ana stood quietly in the classroom and watched her teacher, Kathy Agley, go over her 1 1/2 -page essay line by line. Agley erased the contraction haven't, and Ana replaced it with the words have not. Then Agley explained that sailboat is a compound word, not two words as Ana had written.
NEWS
April 25, 2002
An interview with Carol Stretmater, member of the Highland Book Club. What book are members reading this month? They're reading The Best American Short Stories 2001 edited by Barbara Kingsolver. How did you come to choose that? A different member picks a book each month. The person who has the meeting tells you what to read the next month, and then they lead the discussion that month. Does your group read any nonfiction? Ah yes, we just read Seabiscuit. ... They all liked it. It's well written, and it's written so that it's really easy to read.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | November 2, 2003
The World: Travels 1950-2000, by Jan Morris. Norton, 480 pages. $27.95. Morris was 24 in 1953 when The Times of London published the first piece in this magnificent anthology -- a first-person report from the British expedition that conquered Mount Everest. The epilogue is a paean to kindness, the consummate value that Morris finds sound and enduring at age 75 -- an essay written at the end of a final round-the-world tour that ended again at home in Wales on the day before Sept. 11, 2001.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
In yesterday's Today section article about Center Stage's 1997-1998 season, the wrong name was given for the author of the play "Picnic." It was written by William Inge. The same story also misidentified an award won by playwright Lorraine Hansberry. She is the winner of a New York Drama Critics' Circle Award.The Sun regrets the errors.Center Stage will announce today its 1997-1998 season, which includes a Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera and three edgy, challenging works that deal with issues from racial tensions to incest and were written by women -- two of whom are Maryland natives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Davidsonville author Melissa Stanton once had the world's best excuse for cutting work meetings short. "I have to go," she would say. "George Clooney is on the line. " It worked because it was true. Stanton, now 48, spent more than a decade at Time Inc., where she was a senior editor at Life and People magazines and worked on special projects such as the annual "Sexiest Man Alive" issue of People. Then came the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Stanton's husband went into work late that morning.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | October 31, 2013
Observing Washington politics close-up has given me a new appreciation of Shakespeare. Now I see where he got his ideas. "Today, you could say that almost all of our political rhetoric, comes from two books from the 16th and 17th centuries: the King James Bible and Shakespeare's plays," Michael Witmore, director of Folger Shakespeare Library, told me last year. I recently talked to Mr. Witmore again at the 71-year-old independent research library and theater, which sits only a block east of the Capitol.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
Joe DeFilippo felt so moved reading about slain Baltimore Civil Rights worker William Lewis Moore that he wrote a song about the postal worker who was killed 50 years ago in Alabama. DeFilippo, a 36-year Baltimore County Public Schools teacher, felt inspired to write "400 miles" about Moore after reading the June 2 story  in The Baltimore Sun about Moore's unsolved murder. Moore, 35, was killed on April 23, 1963, while on a one-man Civil Rights demonstration where he set out to walk from Chattanooga, Tenn., to Jackson, Miss., to hand deliver a letter to the governor of Mississippi asking him to reverse his stance on segregation.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | October 23, 2013
Despite opposition from one of its board members, the Baltimore County school board approved a 10-year, $15.7 million contract Tuesday night for language arts textbooks. The new textbook series published by McGraw-Hill Education is for grades one through five, and will cost $4.7 million this year. In addition, the board gave its approval for additional expenditures to buy more of the digital and printed materials over the next decade. School board member Michael Collins was the lone dissenter, saying he believed the purchase was premature because the school system has not yet completed writing the curriculum.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
One of the most widely read young authors of the year is shopping for a book deal. Rebecca Martinson, whose furious email to her sorority sisters at University of Maryland became a national sensation, has teamed up with the creators of White Girl Problems to write a novel, the New Republic reports. Martinson has not responded to a request for comment, and we don't know the subject of her novel. But, if Martinson follows her creative writing teacher's advice and writes about what she knows, we can imagine the novel would be about anger, sorority politics, pleasing frat boys, and people who should punch themselves in the face (which, apparently, was most members of her former sorority)
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
Westowne Elementary teacher Kathleen Mannion has spent long hours after classes using a cumbersome website to access the curriculum she is supposed to teach the next day. "I almost feel like I am living in an alternative universe," said Mannion, who told of how she and fellow teachers at the Catonsville area school regularly leave school at 9 p.m. "I do feel frustrated. " One month into the new school year and rigorous new standards known as Common Core, a number of glitches have arisen within Maryland's public school districts.
NEWS
February 4, 2007
Jonathan Pitts Pitts, a graduate of Haverford College and the University of Missouri School of Journalism, has been writing features for The Sun for seven years. His stories have won recognition from the Society of Professional Journalists, the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors and the Missouri Lifestyle Journalism Program. He is co-author, with Whitney Herzog, of You're Missin' a Great Game (Simon and Schuster, 1999). Pitts wrote our cover story in which he became a slave for a day in an immersion program that takes participants back to the 1850s (Article, Page 18)
NEWS
October 8, 1991
For those voters who have been perplexed by the complexities of deficit spending and the slick rhetoric of budget balancing, the members of the House have offered a stunningly simple, albeit unintentional, explanation.Last week the public learned that members of the esteemed lawmaking body had left more than $300,000 in unpaid tabs at the chamber's cafeteria and had written -- and bounced -- more than 8,300 checks at the House bank.With federal legislators unable to keep their own finances in order -- writing bad checks and neglecting to pay the bills -- it's no wonder there is no fiscal discipline in Washington and that the nation is swamped in red ink.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | August 29, 2013
When Dennis ONeal returned to his car last week after eating lunch in Harbor East, he was stunned to see a parking ticket on his windshield. And for good reason: The $32 ticket had been issued just nine minutes after he paid for a full hour of street parking on South Central Avenue. "This is an obvious error," the Canton resident said in an interview. "It's so simple. " ONeal provided The Baltimore Sun a copy of his kiosk receipt showing he paid $2 to park from 12:06 p.m. to 1:07 p.m. He also provided a copy of the citation.
EXPLORE
March 5, 2013
Thank you for printing the column by Maria Santo. I agree with her well-written, logical piece on abortion, and I commend you for opening the door to inevitable controversy. Catherine LaFerriere Highland
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