Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWriting A Book
IN THE NEWS

Writing A Book

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 21, 1993
* Winston Burdett,Winston Burdett, a veteran CBS foreign correspondent 79, who covered the Nazi invasion of Norway, died Wednesday at a Rome hospital after a long illness. He joined CBS as a free-lancer in 1940 and was considered one of the giants of the Golden Age of radio reporting. "He and . . . Edward R. Murrow, had the two best voices ever to grace the airwaves," CBS newscaster Dan Rather said. Mr. Burdett turned his experiences in Egypt into a book, "Encounters of the Middle East." He also was a scholar of Italian art and literature.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Minutes before convicted Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad was executed Tuesday night in Virginia, he said goodbye to a Baltimore lawyer who had become a trusted confidant. "I love you, brother," Muhammad said, according to the attorney, J. Wyndal Gordon, and Gordon told the condemned man he loved him back. Then Gordon shook Muhammad's hand through the bars and clutched his elbow with his free hand. "I was looking at him in his eyes," he said. "There was just no fear there, like he had resigned to it."
Advertisement
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | April 5, 1996
EVERGREEN PARK, Ill. -- He came of age in the 1950s in this Chicago suburb, playing chess, studying the moon through a telescope, lugging around advanced math books, and experimenting with a homemade chemistry set to "blow things up."Theodore J. Kaczynski has always been an introspective outsider, according to friends and neighbors who knew him. He was the oldest son and namesake of a father who worked at a Polish sausage factory. His mother served on the PTA.It was his mother, Wanda, who pushed him to succeed in his studies -- pressure that resulted in his skipping two grades in high school, winning admission to Harvard, and ultimately going on to become an assistant professor of mathematics during a turbulent two years, from 1967 to 1969, at the University of California at Berkeley.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
For Mark Bowden, writing a book about the 1958 pro football championship game between the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants was a return to his roots. Bowden made his name writing prize-winning articles for The Philadelphia Inquirer and best-selling books such as Black Hawk Down, his reconstruction of a disastrous U.S. military raid in Somalia, and Killing Pablo, his chronicle of the manhunt for Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. But before all that came Baltimore. Bowden was 13 when his family moved to town in the mid-1960s.
NEWS
By D.J. Tice | February 10, 1999
IT SEEMS somebody let on to Minnesota Gov. Jesse "The Body" Ventura that another local personality, Garrison Keillor, is writing a book about him, a satire about a professional wrestler named Jimmy "Big Boy" Valente who gets himself elected governor.Mr. Ventura thinks Mr. Keillor is "cheating," rather like various cartoonists, moviemakers and merchandisers the governor has bad-mouthed for "making money off of me." Mr. Ventura is also, um, writing a book about himself. He probably figures there's some remote chance that Mr. Keillor's book will be better.
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | October 20, 1995
O. J. INC. WHAT can I do for you?''''I want a hot guest -- something different -- for my daughter's wedding. Do you have any prosecutors available?''''I'm sorry -- all our prosecutors are taken for a Halloween party in Malibu. Would you like to rent a DNA expert from New Jersey who found blood in the spare tire of the Bronco?''''No, this is a high-class wedding, and I want to impress my guests. Could you get me Judge Ito to perform the ceremony?''''He's not available. He's in the process of writing a book.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 1, 1993
Bob Denver says he started his book first. In fact, he gave former "Gilligan's Island" co-stars Russell Johnson and Dawn Wells the idea, resulting in a 1993 tidal wave of three "Gilligan's" recollections."
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | December 10, 1990
'Tis a wonderful season, what with carolers crooning, cash registers ringing and folks getting that slightly crazed, holidazed feeling. We'll try to help -- or at least give you a few seasonal laughs along the way -- in The Sun.Ready the baking sheets for a visit from St. NoshWhat's a nice Jewish girl like Rose Levy Beranbaum doing writing a book about Christmas cookies?For one thing, she's following up on her first book "The Cake Bible," named top book of 1988 by the International Association of Cooking Professionals.
SPORTS
June 15, 1995
Henry W. Thomas did not know much about his grandfather, who died of tuberculosis soon after Thomas was born. He knew Walter Johnson was a famous pitcher for the Washington Senators early in the century. Thomas didn't know how famous until he discovered the Walter Johnson family scrapbooks at his mother's Virginia home. The scrapbooks taught Thomas a lot about Johnson, but he knew there was more. Thomas quit his job as a nightclub manager and began researching his grandfather's life. His work culminated with the private publication of Thomas' book, "Walter Johnson: Baseball's Big Train."
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
Fourth-graders at Bodkin Elementary School acknowledge they had trouble imagining all the steps an author goes through when writing a book -- until they had to do it themselves.The students in Denise Koch's fourth-grade class have spent nearly the entire school year working on that very project. Soon, they will have their own books to show for their efforts -- real ones, too, complete with illustrations and bound in a hard cover."It's a lot harder work than it seems," says Brad Lines, 10. "I knew some of the steps that went into writing a book, but I didn't know them all."
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | January 13, 2008
Whether he's writing a book about American crocodiles that he hunted in the Florida Keys, or a black bear that he spotted on his Vermont farm, Jim Arnosky spends his life teaching children about nature and wildlife. He recently visited Darlington Elementary School, where he entertained students with original stories and songs. "I want the kids to hear what it's like for my wife and I to go to a place and have our experiences turn into a book," said Arnosky, who has written 105 non-fiction children's books.
NEWS
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2007
I originally thought I was going to write this encyclopedic book of lynching," says Sherrilyn Ifill, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Law in Baltimore. Instead, her research took a narrative turn as she focused on the tragic deaths of Matthew Williams and George Armwood, two black men murdered by white mobs on the Eastern Shore in the 1930s - the last two recorded lynchings in Maryland. Ifill wound up devoting five years to writing On the Courthouse Lawn ($25.95, Beacon Press)
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
On the water Even in winter, one can dream about sailing. And as the temperature drops, perhaps the most comfortable way to do this is by a fire, with a blanket and a book. A Cats: A Century of Tradition (Nomad Press, $49.95) is Annapolis-based sailor Gary Jobson's latest volume. It tells the history of the A Cat fleet and catboat racing on Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, where Jobson grew up. An A Cat is a rare type of catboat - distinguished by its single sail and mast at the very front of the boat.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 2005
Juli Murray, a junior at Centennial High School, often writes short stories, but she had never tackled a novel. She was inspired to give it a try by an international challenge that has no prizes and very little structure -- National Novel Writing Month. The only goal is to write a 50,000-word novel in 30 days. The results are uploaded to the National Novel Writing Month organization (www.nanowrimo.org), where the word count is verified. After that ... nothing. Nobody reads or judges the works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mimi Avins and Mimi Avins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2005
LOS ANGELES - There are two groups who seem to indulge in writing memoirs: people who are too young to have lived through very much, and those who have lived so long that they've forgotten much that happened. Jamie Reidy would seem to be from the first pack. He's only 35, and his story, Hard Sell, chronicles his professional adventures for exactly five years, from age 25 to 30. But in his last two years working as a salesman for Pfizer, the world's largest pharmaceutical company, he was among 119 reps in the urology division charged with marketing a new wonder pill called Viagra.
NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
Kathy Lating-Wise of Havre de Grace and Elizabeth "Libby" Lawson-Lilley of Cub Hill recently released their first book, Letters of Advice for Child Care Providers - a compilation of early elementary child-care questions and advice. The book is a series of queries sent from day-care provider Lating-Wise to pediatric nurse practitioner Lawson-Lilley, who answers questions in a "Dear Abby"-type manner. Chapters such as health, development, socialization and eating habits categorize 100 child-care problem scenarios, conveyed with humor by Lating-Wise.
NEWS
By Esther B. Fein and Esther B. Fein,New York Times News Service GtB | October 4, 1991
First came the coup of the Kremlin; now comes the coup between hard covers: President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has sold his account of the August uprising for a reported $500,000 to HarperCollins.Giving new heft and meaning to the ever-growing field of quickie books, HarperCollins says it plans to translate the 74-page typed manuscript, print it, bind it and ship it to stores before the end of this month.In a nation where Nikita S. Khrushchev, after his own overthrow, was forced to write his memoirs in secret and smuggle them out of the country, many Kremlin denizens are now tell-all graphomaniacs.
BUSINESS
By Newsday | August 15, 1994
Sales of business books are exploding and publishing companies have responded with a bewildering array of titles on the hot topics.The Book Industry Study Group, a trade research organization, said that sales of books aimed at business professionals are projected to reach $594 million in 1997, compared with $389 million in 1987.High priests such as Michael Hammer (Reengineering the Corporation: A Manifesto for Business Revolution) and Tom Peters (In Search of Excellence) have sold hundreds of thousands of books.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2004
When her blind, facially disfigured son Jermaine was a newborn 20 years ago, Jacqui Kess-Gardner prayed he would die in his sleep. Instead, the boy from Ednor Gardens, a neighborhood near the old Memorial Stadium, developed into a musical wonder, amazing fellow students and teachers at the Baltimore School for the Arts with his prowess and perfect pitch as a classical pianist. Now, at 20, Gardner is a student at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Ohio, training to become a professional musician and recording artist.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
Time magazine gazes this week into the future of arthritis as millions of baby boomers develop aching joints. The writer searches for an apt way to describe the trouble brewing, what with so many aging joggers and so much obesity, and comes up with this: "It's almost as if we were watching the formation of an epidemiological perfect storm." An analyst at a Canadian mutual fund company tells a reporter: "The coffee industry is facing a perfect storm of industrial, institutional, and social failure."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.