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By Pete Pichaske | September 16, 2013
Speaking from a grandparent's viewpoint, I can say with certainty and some authority that multigenerational living is disruptive, trying and exhausting. And it's just about the best thing ever. For three weeks this spring, my oldest daughter and her husband and three young children -- their old house sold, their new house not quite ready for them -- moved in with my wife and me. My wife suggested the idea, but I was quick to sign on, convinced it would never happen. “Sure, we can make the offer,” I told her, “but you know how they value their privacy.” Two weeks later, I was helping them move their beds into two of our upstairs bedrooms, the parents and 1-year-old Raymond into one, and Emma, 5, and Sophia, 4, into another.
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NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Writing at Vanity Fair , James Wolcott mourns the passing of the Boston Phoenix , including a memorable appreciation of the copy editor's craft by Al Giordano:  Copy editors were the heart and soul of the  Phoenix  experience, and I've long since thought that separating the two kinds of editing was at the core of the paper's genius. Let me explain: A story editor checks your facts and challenges you on them, and you debate with him or her and fuss over the content and substance of your story.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
Forget the stars. The people I always wanted to talk to were the writers and producers who created the fictional worlds that became long-running TV series. One of the great pleasures of this job in my earlier days on the beat was going out to California, breaking away from my colleagues on the press tour and spending a long afternoon in a producer's bungalow on a studio backlot as he or she told me and my tape recorder how their visions became prime-time series. Whether it was Steven Bochco talking about “Hill Street Blues” or Larry Gelbart explaining the history of “M*A*S*H,” I always felt as if I was being let in on a great secret as to how entertainment, culture and sometimes even art was improbably created in the hyper-commercial world of Hollywood.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
On May 9, Dennis Lane stopped for lunch with companions at Clyde's of Columbia, one of his favorite spots. Folks say you wouldn't have to see him to know he was there because you'd hear the big laugh, or see the crowd of people around him, sharing views of local politics, business, the latest beer available in growlers in Ellicott City. That night, the writer and commercial real estate broker-consultant posted to "Tales of Two Cities," the blog about Ellicott City and Columbia he'd been writing steadily since 2006.
NEWS
May 23, 2013
This is in response to the letter writer from Catonsville who wrote that he was "appalled" by Home Depot's decision to no longer allow a hot dog stand in front of its stores ("Home Depot hammers the little guy, again," May 20). The main thing that the writer fails to remember is that Home Depot owns the property and has the right to act like any other landlord and exercise their right to renew or cancel a lease as they see fit. Angelo Micklos was given proper notice to vacate the property and it is not up to the writer to question business practices for Home Depot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
On paper, Lisa Scottoline is a little intimidating. She's got more than 30 million copies in print of her books, including 20 best-selling novels. She writes a weekly column, with her daughter, for The Philadelphia Inquirer. She's a graduate of Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and taught a class at the latter called "Justice and Fiction. " But ask her about any connections she might have to Baltimore, where she'll be visiting May 20 as a featured author in the Baltimore Sun Book Club, and you'll quickly discover her self-deprecating sense of humor.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 6, 2013
When it comes to books, I guess you could call me a voracious listener. I have been commuting about an hour to and from work for more than 30 years, and during that time I bet I've listened to a couple of thousand books. First on tape, now on compact discs. If you had to sit in traffic that long every day - and it is worst on a Friday in summer, when everyone is trying to cross the Bay Bridge - you'd listen to anything that might distract you, too. And I have delved into a wide range of titles, from history to historical fiction to murder mysteries to true crime.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | April 25, 2013
The following letter was sent regarding the article written by Bryna Zumer and is published with the consent of the writer. I just want to take this opportunity to acknowledge with heartfelt appreciation that I and my family feel for the wonderful article you wrote regarding Joshua's case. So many people have told me that your article touched them so much and brought tears to them. I am so thankful that you took your time to come and sit there and wait as we saw the court system has their own agenda and schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
David Poyer is a retired naval officer, and most of the 34 thrillers that he's written draw on his experience serving in the waters of the Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Caribbean and Persian Gulf. So it was inevitable that at some point he'd take on the whale of all tales, "Moby Dick. " But try as Poyer might, he couldn't figure out how to write the sequel to Herman Melville's great American novel. Then one day, while the 63-year-old Poyer was teaching a creative writing course at Pennsylvania's Wilkes University, the solution came to him in a flash: "When I'm brainstorming with students, my brain doubles its IQ after a short period of time from my usually reptilian torpor at home," the 63-year-old Poyer said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
Loyal readers of The Sun's opinion section may have felt a twinge of name recognition at the news of a 50-year-old Lutherville physician accidentally struck and seriously injured by an SUV on northbound North Charles Street Thursday morning. That might be because the pedestrian involved was a familiar name on these pages - Dr. Theodore "Ted" Houk. If Dr. Houk had walked into an editorial board meeting last week, it's doubtful anyone would have recognized him on sight. But as a writer of letters to the editor, he enjoys a modest form of celebrity in our offices.
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