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NEWS
March 31, 1998
An award-winning Sun writer and Goucher College's writer-in-residence will speak on "Women Writing About Women" at 8 p.m. today in Merrick Hall at the college, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road.Giving public readings at the college's 13th annual women's writing competition will be: Alice Steinbach, winner of a Pulitzer Price for feature writing and author of two books, and Elizabeth Spires, author of four volumes of poetry and winner of several awards and fellowships.A third scheduled writer, Ntozake Shange, will not speak today because of "unforseeable circumstances," according to the school.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Baltimore may not be Hollywood East, but once again, the Oscars include a distinctly Bawlamer element. Craig Bartholomew Strydom, writer of the Oscar-winning documentary "Searching for Sugar Man," lived in Baltimore until last year. Read about his involvement with the film here . With some luck, maybe he'll return to Baltimore for his next project? Perhaps a documentary on Frank Zappa? Now there's a documentary that needs to be done...  
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK | November 12, 2006
Each Sunday throughout the HBO drama's 13-week season, TV critic David Zurawik will highlight a must-see character or story element appearing in the current episode. THE WIRE / / Airs at 10 tonight on HBO
NEWS
March 1, 1998
Ken Fuson, a writer for The Sun's Today section, has been awarded the top prize in feature writing by the American Society of Newspaper Editors for his June 1997 series "A Stage in Their Lives."The six-day series, which chronicled the making of the musical "West Side Story" at North County High School in Anne Arundel County, won the ASNE's 1998 Distinguished Writing Award for nondeadline writing.It was one of seven annual journalism prizes awarded by the society, made up of top editors from daily newspapers in the United States and Canada.
NEWS
By Staff Report | September 23, 1993
Kathleen Parker Cleveland, who writes a weekly lifestyle column for the Orlando Sentinel, has won The Baltimore Sun's 13th annual H. L. Mencken Writing Award.Ms. Cleveland, a free-lance journalist from Columbia, S.C., who XTC uses the byline of Kathleen Parker, was selected as the newspaper writer whose regularly published column captures the power of Mencken's public commentary and the precision of his craft. Her lifestyle column, "Men and Women," is distributed nationally.Mencken was a columnist for The Evening Sun from 1910 to 1938.
NEWS
April 17, 2007
Francis L.P. Kelly, a retired writer and former Pasadena resident, died in his sleep April 10 at a hospital in Smyrna, Del. He was 79. Francis Lawrence Patrick Kelly was born on Long Island, N.Y., and raised in Bellerose, N.Y. He served in the Navy in the Pacific during the waning days of World War II. Mr. Kelly earned a bachelor's degree from Fordham University in 1948 and a master's degree from Canisius College in Buffalo, N.Y., in 1951. He worked as a writer for numerous publications in New York, before moving from Buffalo to Annandale, Va., in 1965.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | November 15, 1998
As a newspaper writer and editor involved with books, I get asked questions. The most frequent one comes from people who have written books or are in the process of writing books or who are considering writing books. They seek the secret of getting published. Every one yearns for success, in dollars or fame or preferably both.I am sympathetic but useless.My response is much like my counsel to earnest young people asking about futures in journalism: "Don't do it!" There is, of course, some wiggle room.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 19, 1997
NEW YORK -- What writer has not suffered the indignity of a typo? But for Isaac Bashevis Singer, this particular typo was the ultimate indignity: It was on his gravestone.To some of his friends, it was a cruel insult, a mistake set in stone. Others saw it as a comic absurdity, one that would have certainly been appreciated by Singer himself. His widow, like a Singer character afloat in her own world, was willing to let it pass.But yesterday, nearly six years after the death of the Yiddish writer who won the 1978 Nobel Prize in literature, a monument engraver finally corrected Singer's honorific.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | October 19, 1990
"People don't value life," says writer J. California Cooper, fairly popping out of the chair with enthusiasm as she makes her point. "Sometimes I kiss my hands and my knees because they work. Look, I can hold a glass of water. I can walk across the room. Life is a miracle!"People often misuse this gift of life, a failing which has provided Ms. Cooper with abundant material for three collections of short stories: "A Piece of Mine," "Homemade Love," and "Some Soul To Keep."Her work has garnered several awards, including the James Baldwin Book Award and the Literary Lion Award, both in 1988, and the Middle-Atlantic Writers Association's (MAWA)
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1997
Baltimore's most famous writer of the macabre -- Edgar Allan Poe -- died more than 147 years ago, but this weekend, a local actor who specializes in dramatizing his short stories is bringing him back to life.Wearing a brown, wavy wig and a green cravat, David Keltz -- partly into his Poe costume -- said yesterday he expects people as far away as France and Japan to come see him today as he performs his one-man show: "A Visit to the Haunted Palace," the finale of a weekendlong Poe birthday celebration.
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