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By SHERIE POSESORSKI | September 30, 1990
The Disappearance of the Outside:a Manifesto for Escape.Andrei Codrescu.Addison-Wesley.216 pages. $17.95. When we think about imagination, often we think only of it in relationship to art, and not life. That is a dangerous and debilitating practice, Andrei Codrescu declares in this polemical collection of essays. The sinewy plea underlying all the essays is his advocacy of the imagination as a moral and political force.According to Mr. Codrescu, in the East the atrophy of the imagination caused by the restrictions and repressions of the police state has led to brutality; and in the West the superficiality of consumer-oriented image-makers has led to narcolepsy.
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NEWS
December 5, 1997
Diana K. Sugg, a reporter for The Sun, was named winner yesterday of the 1997 A. D. Emmart Memorial Prize for "The Forever Children," a March 23 article on an aging man's struggle to care for his 43-year-old disabled son.Her article also won the 1997 Community Media Excellence Award, one of two awards given annually by The Arc of the United States, a national organization on mental retardation.The Emmart prize of $1,000 honors writing in the humanities published in a Maryland general-readership newspaper or magazine.
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By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | July 8, 1993
IRKUTSK, Russia -- There are 45 members in the Writers Union in this city of 600,000, which sounds like a pretty high novelist-per-capita ratio, but only one of them has a serious reputation that extends beyond this corner of eastern Siberia.And even he isn't doing much writing these days, afflicted as he is with a discouragement, a post-Soviet letdown, that borders on despair.He is Valentin Grigorievich Rasputin, a novelist and short-story writer whose world has been torn asunder by the collapse of the very system that once persecuted him.Mr.
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By Gwinn Owens | July 31, 1992
THE FORCES that shape our destiny are often not recognized at the time, but it would be easy to argue that I am what I am because of a men's store called Isaac Hamburger & Sons, now, sadly, going out of business. It was one of those retail institutions, like Hutzler's, Hochschild Kohn or O'Neill's, whose civic-minded entrepreneurs gave -- and whose descendants still give -- Baltimore much of its character.What I claim to be is a writer. Like many others aspiring for a specific career, a writer often decides to pursue his craft as a result of an early, unexpected success.
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By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 21, 1993
THE ART OF HUNGER: ESSAYS,PREFACES, INTERVIEWS.Paul Auster.Sun & Moon Press.! 312 pages. $24.95As a title, "The Art of Hunger" applies to much more than the leadoff essay on the odd first novel called "Hunger," published in 1890 by Knut Hamsun -- a work so idiosyncratic that in its pages, says American novelist Paul Auster, Mr. Hamsun "walks straight into the twentieth century" and into an artistic challenge most serious writers face a century later.This...
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | June 7, 1991
Sylvia Porter, whose 57 years of newspaper column translated financial and economic "bafflegab" into plain English for plain folks, died Wednesday of emphysema at her home in Westchester County, N.Y. She was 77.Porter broke new ground as a woman journalist, pioneered in personal financial advice and wrote consumer advocacy columns before the idea had a name."
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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 20, 1993
In this corner, weighing 200-plus pounds, from Oakland, Calif., Ishmael ("Writin' Is Fightin' ") REED!!!And in this corner, the rest of the world.Guess who wins.More often than not, it's Ishmael Reed. In all of America, there may not be a more adept polemicist, a more skilled satirist, than this large-framed, acerbic 54-year-old writer -- or one more eager to join in the fray, whatever the subject.Here is Mr. Reed writing in his new novel, "Japanese by Spring," about a favorite target, black feminists:"While the underclass women were getting their subsistence budgets cut by white male politicians, journalists, and think-tank black pathology gangsters, she, being a "talented tenth" aristocrat, blamed the problems of her and her 'diva' buddies on white women and black men."
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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | July 19, 2009
It was the kind of story that cried out to be told. Or so Terry Mattingly thought. It was 1982, and a little-known punk band from Ireland was touring U.S. colleges for the first time, rattling from town to town in an old panel truck. Mattingly, then a music writer for a small Illinois paper, was intrigued by the chorus from a song on their new album. The lyrics were, of all things, in Latin - gloria in te domine, gloria exultate - and appeared to have been taken from an ancient Mass. In two days he spent with the band, Mattingly, a journalist who now lives in Glen Burnie, persuaded the lead singer to speak about his faith.
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By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
AT 62, WRITER MAYA ANGELOU can look back at the shy, unspeaking little girl who lived in Stamps, Arkansas during the Depression and remember herself. She can also reflect upon the ballet dancer, the chanteuse, the opera singer, the screen writer, the playwright, the poet, the autobiographer and claim these for herself too."The more liberated a person is the more free she can be to look at herself through various and sundry prisms. It is indicative of a narrow society when we say, 'because he's a brick mason he can't like ballet,' or 'because she's an intellectual, she can't speak slang.
NEWS
March 31, 1998
An award-winning Sun writer and Goucher College's writer-in-residence will speak on "Women Writing About Women" at 8 p.m. today in Merrick Hall at the college, 1021 Dulaney Valley Road.Giving public readings at the college's 13th annual women's writing competition will be: Alice Steinbach, winner of a Pulitzer Price for feature writing and author of two books, and Elizabeth Spires, author of four volumes of poetry and winner of several awards and fellowships.A third scheduled writer, Ntozake Shange, will not speak today because of "unforseeable circumstances," according to the school.
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