Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWriter
IN THE NEWS

Writer

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
June 16, 1994
The body of a man found dead in an Annapolis apartment Monday has been identified as that of Gardner D. Brown, 64, a free-lance writer and logo designer.The body was found in the bathtub at 95 1/2 West St. shortly after an employee of a business located under the apartment called police to report an odor. Officers entered the residence and found the body, nude except for a shirt over the head.Results of an autopsy performed yesterday were inconclusive. The cause of death won't be known until toxicology tests are completed, police said.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | December 8, 1994
James Thurber, born 100 years ago today was destined to be odd. That he was funny, too, was merely a bonus.So begins a breezy new biography of the famed writer and cartoonist, "Remember Laughter" (University of Nebraska Press), by Baltimore writer Neil A. Grauer. Timed to coincide with the centenary of Thurber's birth, the book arrives in stores just ahead of a movie about the famed Algonquin Round Table called "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle."This sudden interest in the first generation of New Yorker writers and wits -- which included not only Thurber, but E.B. White, and those of who gathered to dine and dish at the Algonquin Hotel, such as Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Alexander Woollcott -- doesn't surprise Mr. Grauer.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | February 24, 1992
PAULE MARSHALL doesn't claim to be fashionable. In fact, few of the adjectives one might ascribe to a popular writer of the '90s seem to apply to her.She is an admittedly slow writer, publishing a novel about once every decade. She's also a very private person, never having felt comfortable with the publishing world's penchant for thrusting authors into high-profile positions.While neither pace nor privacy has precluded her recognition as a major American writer in literary circles, she never seemed to attract a large popular audience to match the critical acclaim of her work.
FEATURES
By SHERIE POSESORSKI | September 30, 1990
The Disappearance of the Outside:a Manifesto for Escape.Andrei Codrescu.Addison-Wesley.216 pages. $17.95. When we think about imagination, often we think only of it in relationship to art, and not life. That is a dangerous and debilitating practice, Andrei Codrescu declares in this polemical collection of essays. The sinewy plea underlying all the essays is his advocacy of the imagination as a moral and political force.According to Mr. Codrescu, in the East the atrophy of the imagination caused by the restrictions and repressions of the police state has led to brutality; and in the West the superficiality of consumer-oriented image-makers has led to narcolepsy.
NEWS
December 5, 1997
Diana K. Sugg, a reporter for The Sun, was named winner yesterday of the 1997 A. D. Emmart Memorial Prize for "The Forever Children," a March 23 article on an aging man's struggle to care for his 43-year-old disabled son.Her article also won the 1997 Community Media Excellence Award, one of two awards given annually by The Arc of the United States, a national organization on mental retardation.The Emmart prize of $1,000 honors writing in the humanities published in a Maryland general-readership newspaper or magazine.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | July 8, 1993
IRKUTSK, Russia -- There are 45 members in the Writers Union in this city of 600,000, which sounds like a pretty high novelist-per-capita ratio, but only one of them has a serious reputation that extends beyond this corner of eastern Siberia.And even he isn't doing much writing these days, afflicted as he is with a discouragement, a post-Soviet letdown, that borders on despair.He is Valentin Grigorievich Rasputin, a novelist and short-story writer whose world has been torn asunder by the collapse of the very system that once persecuted him.Mr.
NEWS
By Gwinn Owens | July 31, 1992
THE FORCES that shape our destiny are often not recognized at the time, but it would be easy to argue that I am what I am because of a men's store called Isaac Hamburger & Sons, now, sadly, going out of business. It was one of those retail institutions, like Hutzler's, Hochschild Kohn or O'Neill's, whose civic-minded entrepreneurs gave -- and whose descendants still give -- Baltimore much of its character.What I claim to be is a writer. Like many others aspiring for a specific career, a writer often decides to pursue his craft as a result of an early, unexpected success.
NEWS
By Joseph Coates and Joseph Coates,Chicago Tribune | February 21, 1993
THE ART OF HUNGER: ESSAYS,PREFACES, INTERVIEWS.Paul Auster.Sun & Moon Press.! 312 pages. $24.95As a title, "The Art of Hunger" applies to much more than the leadoff essay on the odd first novel called "Hunger," published in 1890 by Knut Hamsun -- a work so idiosyncratic that in its pages, says American novelist Paul Auster, Mr. Hamsun "walks straight into the twentieth century" and into an artistic challenge most serious writers face a century later.This...
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | February 20, 1993
In this corner, weighing 200-plus pounds, from Oakland, Calif., Ishmael ("Writin' Is Fightin' ") REED!!!And in this corner, the rest of the world.Guess who wins.More often than not, it's Ishmael Reed. In all of America, there may not be a more adept polemicist, a more skilled satirist, than this large-framed, acerbic 54-year-old writer -- or one more eager to join in the fray, whatever the subject.Here is Mr. Reed writing in his new novel, "Japanese by Spring," about a favorite target, black feminists:"While the underclass women were getting their subsistence budgets cut by white male politicians, journalists, and think-tank black pathology gangsters, she, being a "talented tenth" aristocrat, blamed the problems of her and her 'diva' buddies on white women and black men."
FEATURES
By Sujata Banerjee and Sujata Banerjee,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
AT 62, WRITER MAYA ANGELOU can look back at the shy, unspeaking little girl who lived in Stamps, Arkansas during the Depression and remember herself. She can also reflect upon the ballet dancer, the chanteuse, the opera singer, the screen writer, the playwright, the poet, the autobiographer and claim these for herself too."The more liberated a person is the more free she can be to look at herself through various and sundry prisms. It is indicative of a narrow society when we say, 'because he's a brick mason he can't like ballet,' or 'because she's an intellectual, she can't speak slang.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.