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FEATURES
November 8, 1998
We are often stunned by the work of Jane Yolen, author of "Owl Moon" and "Ballad of the Pirate Queens." Not for her sheer output, though she can rival any writer today with the number of books she has written and edited (more than 200 and counting), but by the wide range of her writing style and her ability to achieve excellence in practically any field she chooses.The author of picture books, folk tales (both original and retellings), poetry and novels for readers from beginners to adults, she skillfully employs fantasy as well as realism to give depth to a body of work that is superb in its use of language.
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NEWS
April 17, 2003
Virgil Elizabeth Lawson, a retired Social Security Administration writer and former Mount Airy resident, died of colon cancer April 10 at her home in Harrison, Tenn. She was 60. Miss Lawson was born and raised in Dryden, Va., and enlisted in the Navy in 1960 after her high school graduation. Upon completing active duty in 1967, she joined a Naval Reserve unit at Fort McHenry. She held the rank of yeoman at her 1980 retirement. Miss Lawson attended what is now Towson University before earning a bachelor's degree in business administration from the Indiana University.
NEWS
February 12, 2007
Bruce M. Wondersek, a reclusive writer who spent most of the days of his adult life at the public library, died of throat cancer Tuesday at the Joseph Ritchie Hospice in Baltimore. He was 62. Raised in eastern Baltimore County, Mr. Wondersek was a 1962 graduate of Parkville High School and received his bachelor's degree in English from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1968. He worked at Bethlehem Steel for nine years in the 1970s, but spent most of his time reading and writing at the North Point Library in Dundalk, said a brother, Karl W. Wondersek Jr. of Staunton, Va. "He told me last week that he had read every book in the library that was worth reading," his brother said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2005
Michael J. Kernan, a former Washington Post writer whose off-beat and detailed feature stories graced the newspaper's Style section for 20 years, died of pancreatic cancer Wednesday at his home in Bennington, Vt. The former Canton resident was 78. Born in Utica, N.Y., and raised in Clinton, N.Y., Mr. Kernan was a 1945 graduate of Deerfield Academy. He earned a bachelor's degree with honors in English from Harvard University in 1949. After leaving Harvard, he began his newspaper career on the Watertown Daily Times in upstate New York.
NEWS
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,Cox News Service | September 12, 1993
It's not like Geneva Holloway is an enormous star, some sort of paragon of the dramatic art. Her latest vehicle, a TV movie remake of "The Philadelphia Story" titled "It Happened in Philadelphia," was greeted by critics with undiluted venom: "I'm opposed to capital punishment but 'It Happened in Philadelphia' has turned me around," read one notice. "Ms. Holloway, like Lee Harvey Oswald, acted alone," was another. Someone who's studied acting with Darryl Hickman deserves gentler treatment.
FEATURES
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Sun | February 8, 1995
"When I was a teenager," novelist Rosellen Brown writes, "I used to think about august figures making love . . . my teacher! the president! of course, my parents!" Later she realized that the truly intimate scene, far more impossible to imagine, was not the act of sex but the act of imaginative creation. What thoughts occurred to the noisy storyteller chewing on a pencil? she wondered. What about the flirtatious poet at midnight?Daniel Halpern -- poet, writer, and editor of Ecco Press -- had similar questions.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1994
Susan Flori Amerikaner is doing lunch her way. Munching a bagel in her sister Ilene's Owings Mills home and chatting about her evolution from Montgomery County elementary school teacher to award-winning children's television writer."
NEWS
June 16, 1994
The body of a man found dead in an Annapolis apartment Monday has been identified as that of Gardner D. Brown, 64, a free-lance writer and logo designer.The body was found in the bathtub at 95 1/2 West St. shortly after an employee of a business located under the apartment called police to report an odor. Officers entered the residence and found the body, nude except for a shirt over the head.Results of an autopsy performed yesterday were inconclusive. The cause of death won't be known until toxicology tests are completed, police said.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Sun Staff Writer | December 8, 1994
James Thurber, born 100 years ago today was destined to be odd. That he was funny, too, was merely a bonus.So begins a breezy new biography of the famed writer and cartoonist, "Remember Laughter" (University of Nebraska Press), by Baltimore writer Neil A. Grauer. Timed to coincide with the centenary of Thurber's birth, the book arrives in stores just ahead of a movie about the famed Algonquin Round Table called "Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle."This sudden interest in the first generation of New Yorker writers and wits -- which included not only Thurber, but E.B. White, and those of who gathered to dine and dish at the Algonquin Hotel, such as Dorothy Parker, Robert Benchley and Alexander Woollcott -- doesn't surprise Mr. Grauer.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | February 24, 1992
PAULE MARSHALL doesn't claim to be fashionable. In fact, few of the adjectives one might ascribe to a popular writer of the '90s seem to apply to her.She is an admittedly slow writer, publishing a novel about once every decade. She's also a very private person, never having felt comfortable with the publishing world's penchant for thrusting authors into high-profile positions.While neither pace nor privacy has precluded her recognition as a major American writer in literary circles, she never seemed to attract a large popular audience to match the critical acclaim of her work.
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