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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2010
William J. Evitts, a noted writer, editor and historian who was a former college professor, died Dec. 14 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 68. The son of a U.S. Department of Labor official and a homemaker, Dr. Evitts was born in Chicago and raised in Arlington, Va., where he graduated from Washington and Lee High School. He earned his bachelor's degree in 1964 from the Johns Hopkins University and was a Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Virginia, where he earned a master's degree in 1966.
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NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
Sharon VanDyke's phone rang Monday afternoon, but after quickly dispensing with the call, she said, sadly, "Well, it wasn't Matthew. " The wait continues for the retired principal, who has searched for the past five months for her son, a 32-year-old writer and photographer who went to Libya to chronicle the uprising against Moammar Gadhafi but is believed to have been imprisoned with rebel forces. Now, with those insurgents on the brink of toppling Gadhafi, VanDyke is bracing for whatever that means for her son. "I've been more worried in the last 24 to 48 hours than ever," she said Monday, after a mostly sleepless several days of monitoring the events in Libya from her South Baltimore rowhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
When the writer Peter Mehlman was working on the television show "Seinfeld," he could be counted on to come up with the tiniest, most insignificant - and ultimately, the most memorable - plots. It was Mehlman, now 58 and a Los Angeles resident, who explored snack-eating etiquette at parties, and Mehlman who decided that the show's female lead, Elaine, would hoard contraceptive sponges. And it was Mehlman who coined several catchphrases that have entered the cultural lexicon, from "yada yada" to gloss over a conversation, "sponge-worthy" to describe a hot date and "double-dipping" to refer to the practice of dunking a snack into a sauce at a party, taking a bite and then dunking it again into the same container.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2001
The audience member's question about novelist Tim O'Brien's daughter seems reasonable enough, except O'Brien doesn't have a daughter. As the writer was just telling the crowd at Towson University, however, her name is Kathleen. Or at least it was when he told a little about her in The Things They Carried, a Vietnam War novel Tim O'Brien wrote in 1990 from the point of view of a 43-year-old writer and war veteran named Tim O'Brien. And Kathleen is her name when he tells the crowd of a few hundred Wednesday night about how his daughter sometimes nudges her dad to stop already with the war stories.
FEATURES
By Sun staff | October 6, 1998
Sun staff writer Laura Lippman has been named winner of a 1998 Shamus Award for mystery fiction.Lippman, who has published three Baltimore-based mysteries over the past two years, received the annual award from the Private Eye Writers of America at this past weekend's Bouchercon World Mystery Convention in Philadelphia.Lippman was nominated for two Shamus awards -- best first novel, for "Baltimore Blues," and best paperback original, for "Charm City," both from Avon. She won for "Charm City," which earlier this year won the Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for best paperback original.
NEWS
June 16, 1991
Howard County Sun bowling columnist Don Vitek has been named Writer of the Year by the Maryland Bowling Writers Association.Vitek also won first- and second-place honors in both the senior and column categories.The awards were presented during the association's annual meetinglast Sunday.Vitek writes columns that are published in all four of The Sun's suburban editions.Two of his four award-winning columns were published in The Howard County Sun last September: "Pro Bowlers Circuit is Not All Glitz," the first place winner; and "Practice Hard, Roll Up Big Scores," which won second place.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 14, 1990
YOU WOULD BE surprised (or perhaps mildly taken aback) at the number of people who will corner a writer at a cocktail party and inquire -- even before he or she has a chance to rake a cracker through the onion dip -- about writer's block.Writer's block is defined as that malady in which the writer's creative juices have seemingly dried from a great gushing torrent to a trickle.The writer sits and stares at a blank piece of typing paper or word processor screen and can summon neither an interesting thought nor a clever phrase, soon convincing himself that it would be far better for all concerned if he abandoned the literary life for that job in the fish store, straightening the haddock and doling out half-pounds of boiled shrimp to appreciative customers.
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