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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
Last week, when I posted about training oneself to be an editor , someone commented on Facebook: " I'm curious, does any part of editor training involve breaking it to people gently? I would be surprised if it did, but I think that would be the hard part of editing, handing/sending back the document without making the writer want to quit writing. " Writer and editor experience an odd intimacy. Much as professionals school themselves to think that the text is an artifact, a product rather than an extension of the self, that text is still a personal expression.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Francis Scott Key is so closely identified with Fort McHenry that the South Baltimore landmark is considered the go-to place to learn how the 15-starred American flag that flew after the fort's bombardment 200 years ago inspired him to write the poem that became the national anthem. But those wishing to pay their final respects to the lawyer-turned-poet could also head 50 miles west to Frederick, where Key is buried in a sprawling cemetery that runs along U.S. 40 where it shares the roadway with busy Interstate 70. "Key always wanted to be buried in the shadow of the Catoctin Mountains," said Ron Pearcey, the superintendent of Mount Olivet Cemetery.
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NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Writing at Vanity Fair , James Wolcott mourns the passing of the Boston Phoenix , including a memorable appreciation of the copy editor's craft by Al Giordano:  Copy editors were the heart and soul of the  Phoenix  experience, and I've long since thought that separating the two kinds of editing was at the core of the paper's genius. Let me explain: A story editor checks your facts and challenges you on them, and you debate with him or her and fuss over the content and substance of your story.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2014
Allen Grossman,a prize-winning poet who spent 15 years teaching his craft to students at the Johns Hopkins University, died June 27 at his home in Chelsea, Mass. He was 82 and had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease. "Allen was an inimitable instructor," said Douglas Basford, assistant director of composition at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, and a former student of Dr. Grossman's at Hopkins. Remembering a class he audited in poetry and poetics, Mr. Basford recalled the instructor "probing and prodding to get, as he did in his critical prose, to the core of how a poem worked [and]
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 13, 2013
Ahoy! There's a new admiral on the Chesapeake Bay. John Page Williams, senior naturalist with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation , earned the honorific rank Tuesday night in Annapolis in recognition of his 40-year career teaching and writing about the bay. John R. Griffin, chief of staff for Gov. Martin O'Malley and former natural resources secretary, presented Williams with a framed certificate proclaiming him the newest "Admiral of the Bay....
NEWS
April 24, 2005
The Sun of Howard County is looking for a freelance writer to contribute articles for its education page. Please send resumes to Bureau Chief Mark Bomster at: The Baltimore Sun 30 Corporate Center, Suite 820 10440 Little Patuxent Parkway Columbia 21044
EXPLORE
November 15, 2012
Editor: I see where Wendy Sawyer of the county Democratic committee has the temerity to suggest that, because her party maintains its hegemony in Annapolis, the Republicans elected by the citizens of Harford County to represent them should just abandon their principles and bow to the overlords. To this I politely say, fuhgeddaboutit! What really needs to happen is that Republicans need to take territory in every place the Democrats just gerrymandered to protect the hegemony. But until the voters of Baltimore City, Prince Georges County and Montgomery County get brains and stop sucking up the stuff being put out by the Democrats, Maryland is still in slavery.
NEWS
December 17, 1991
Catherine Pugh has a master's in business administration from Morgan State University. She has worked at Equitable Trust, the Mayor's Office, and the Council for Equal Business Opportunities. She operated The African-American News and World Report, a weekly newspaper. She has been a radio-TV commentator and reporter, and has written for several DTC publications. She is the former director of Strayer Business College. She now heads her own public relations and marketing firm.Eric Addison is a free-lance writer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2010
William J. Evitts, a noted writer, editor and historian who was a former college professor, died Dec. 14 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 68. The son of a U.S. Department of Labor official and a homemaker, Dr. Evitts was born in Chicago and raised in Arlington, Va., where he graduated from Washington and Lee High School. He earned his bachelor's degree in 1964 from the Johns Hopkins University and was a Thomas Jefferson Fellow at the University of Virginia, where he earned a master's degree in 1966.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
There will undoubtedly be a solemn tone to this week's Civil Rights Game festivities in Houston. Nationally renowned poet and essayist Dr. Maya Angelou, who died Wednesday , was scheduled to be one of three Beacon Awards recipients in a luncheon prior to the Civil Rights Game between the Orioles and the Houston Astros on Friday. Last week, Major League Baseball announced that Angelou would be unable to attend the Beacon Awards luncheon because of health reasons. “It is with deep regret that I able unable to attend the MLB Beacon Awards Luncheon,” Angelou said in a statement to MLB.com.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Coming across a reference to Steve Buttry's excellent advice for tightening stories in a 2011 post at The Buttry Diary , I was particularly struck by his remark about the failure of stories when they are written for sources rather than readers I want to talk today about some of the things implicit in that invaluable maxim, write for the reader, not the source . A reporter can write about establishing the essential balance of...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
When Baltimore writer Rafael Alvarez was driving around the country peddling his books, he sold a collection of his newspaper articles and short stories to a drunken farmer in a men's room outside Memphis, Tenn. He's spent countless nights sleeping in his truck. He's traded a book for a meal. A good day is when he ekes out just enough money to buy enough gas to get him to the next town - and that's assuming he doesn't run into an ice storm. So what would Alvarez consider to be a not-so-good day on the road?
NEWS
SPECIAL TO THE AEGIS | May 6, 2014
Josiah Taft of Edgewood is the first-place winner in a national patriotic essay contest sponsored by the National Society of Colonial Wars Inc. Josiah, the son of Brad and MaryAnn Taft, is 13 years old and in eighth grade. He has been home-schooled for eight years. The society annually sponsors an essay competition open to seventh- and eighth-graders. Essays are 250 to 500 words and are judged on subject matter, interest, spelling and punctuation. Each year a new topic is announced; this year's was Colonial Medicine.
NEWS
By Rus VanWestervelt | May 5, 2014
Timonium resident and poet Ann Kolakowski says that what she discovered when her grandmother turned 99 has haunted her to this day. Now, nearly 12 years later, she has published a book of poetry about that discovery. "When my brothers and I were clearing out our grandmother's home when she moved to an assisted living facility," said Kolakowski, "I found a shabby notebook. I opened it and read, 'Marian Brown, Domestic Science/Warren School, Maryland.' I was really confused. " In fact, the town in which her grandmother, Florence Marian Brown Eichler, had spent her childhood and attended Warren School had been bought, razed and flooded in 1921 to create a municipal water supply.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
It's possible that Matthew Olshan didn't fully become a writer until the day that his future boss ordered him to dig a ditch. On that day in the late 1980s, the boss, a carpenter, eyed the short kid with the soft hands. He saw a young man with no experience in the building trades, a new degree from Harvard University and a bewildering mix of aspirations that combined literature and woodworking. The older man understandably was skeptical. "Show up tomorrow and we'll see how you do," he told Olshan.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
A few months after adopting a kitten, David Grimm and his fiancee huddled late one evening in the waiting room of a Towson emergency vet. Jasper, their normally rambunctious gray-and-white kitten, was suffering from acute kidney failure. Although the couple had only had Jasper for a short time, he had become a member of their family. Facing the prospect of his death was devastating. Grimm looked around the waiting room. Families were keeping the sorts of grim vigils usually associated with hospital emergency rooms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
With "Save the Last Dance" and the shot-in-Baltimore "Step Up," Duane Adler established himself as one of the go-to screenwriters for 21st-century dance movies. But apparently that wasn't enough. "Make Your Move," a multicultural dance drama with tons of "Romeo and Juliet" undertones that opens in theaters today, marks Adler's debut as both screenwriter and director. Not that he didn't like what other directors had done with his earlier projects, he stresses. But this one was too much his baby to hand it over to anyone else.
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