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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 3, 2002
As book editor and columnist for a major newspaper in a community littered with universities, centered in a metropolis that for a dozen recent years touted itself as "The City That Reads," I am regularly, often passionately, approached by people who have written -- or are writing, or yearn to write -- a book. The ones who concern me here have not been published. "Successful" writers should already have confidence and counsel. Nor am I concerned with books about self-help, pet training, angel welfare or getting rich tomorrow, or with novels that are sold mainly in airports -- commodity books.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Minutes before convicted Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad was executed Tuesday night in Virginia, he said goodbye to a Baltimore lawyer who had become a trusted confidant. "I love you, brother," Muhammad said, according to the attorney, J. Wyndal Gordon, and Gordon told the condemned man he loved him back. Then Gordon shook Muhammad's hand through the bars and clutched his elbow with his free hand. "I was looking at him in his eyes," he said. "There was just no fear there, like he had resigned to it."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun Staff | August 19, 2001
So, you want to write a book? Don't do it. This I have learned in a hard-working year as assistant to The Sun's book editor, helping screen thousands of books that yearn to be reviewed. For most books, chances of success are slim. Maybe you are one of the lucky few blessed with literary genius. Then you can ignore me. Go write. Some of history's greatest literature has been rejected by the market only to be vindicated by time. If your writing is going to change the world, go for it. But don't expect it to be easy.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 19, 2008
I have a new career plan, and it involves finding something I can do every day for a year and then finding somebody who will pay me to write a book about what happens when I do. This appears to be a lucrative publishing niche. We can now read about guys who spend a year reading the Oxford English Dictionary, the Bible and the Encyclopaedia Britannica. We can read about a woman who spent a year cooking Julia Child's recipes in a tiny New York apartment and a woman who spent a year traveling to three continents to find herself and a woman who spent a year taking all the advice offered in fashion magazines.
NEWS
January 1, 2006
Rona Jaffe, 74, whose 1958 novel The Best of Everything told the melodramatic story of four young career girls torn between storybook romance and cutthroat corporate Manhattan, died of cancer Friday at University College Hospital in London, where she was on vacation. Movie producer Jerry Wald essentially commissioned Miss Jaffe, at the time a 25-year-old former associate editor in publishing, to write a book that he could turn into a blockbuster feature film. Less than a year after the book appeared, The Best of Everything was released as a chic but heavy-handed film by 20th Century Fox. Hope Lange, Diane Baker, Martha Hyer and the 1950s model Suzy Parker starred as the young women about town.
FEATURES
By MELODY HOLMES | June 30, 1999
R.L. Stine, the writer of the popular "Goosebumps" horror series, began writing in 1952 when he was 9 years old, not much older than many of his current fans. Before he began the Goosebumps series in 1992, Stine was known for his humorous children's books that included "101 Silly Monster Jokes" and "Bozos on Patrol." He was also editor of Bananas magazine.Stine remembers being a big fan of scary movies when he was a kid and he recalls those titles when he names new books in the Goosebumps series.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 23, 1993
"The Shot!" reveals the depths of dread that syringes can inspire in the owners of young arms, but 9-year-old author Hailey Elizabeth Glanville says it's not a personal account of her fears.Hailey, a fourth-grader at Mechanicsville Elementary School from Finksburg, said she's not afraid of shots. She hit on the idea for "The Shot!" after suffering a brief bout of writer's block when her class was assigned to write books that would be donated to Carroll County General Hospital's pediatric unit.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1997
The reviews are starting to come in on Dick Morris' tattletale book, "Behind the Oval Office." The New York Times calls it "lively, readable and anecdotally rich." Even the White House has spoken: "fascinating reading" if at times "factually wrong."But if you're interested in a review from Sherry Rowlands, the prostitute who made Dick Morris famous outside the Beltway with her tabloid revelations of his foot fetish and propensity to share presidential phone calls, you'll have to wait. She's not about to spend $25.95 on it, and instead is waiting for a free copy that her own book agent has promised to send.
NEWS
By Felicia Pride and Felicia Pride,Special to The Sun | April 6, 2008
Author and bookstore owner Carl Weber says the idea for his latest book, Something on the Side, came from watching an episode of HBO's Sex and the City. "I decided to write a plus-sized version of the show," says Weber, 41, who recently appeared at a book signing at the Catonsville Wal-Mart. His primary readership of black women enjoys his humorous drama-filled spins on everyday life. Released in January, Something on the Side reached The New York Times best-sellers list. Weber also has had other works appear on that list, including The First Lady and So You Call Yourself a Man. Weber's latest book revolves around the adventurous lives of six women from the Big Girls Book Club, a group for plus-sized women, who are at least a size 14. Weber says this is a demographic that gravitates to his books.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
The Montgomery County Ethics Commission ruled yesterday that Police Chief Charles A. Moose cannot write a book or consult for a movie based on last fall's sniper investigation because he would be profiting from the prestige of his office. Moose, who became the anguished public face of law enforcement during the sniper attacks that killed 10 people in the Washington region in October, can appeal the decision to Circuit Court. Moose had not received word of the ethics commission's decision yesterday.
NEWS
By Felicia Pride and Felicia Pride,Special to The Sun | April 6, 2008
Author and bookstore owner Carl Weber says the idea for his latest book, Something on the Side, came from watching an episode of HBO's Sex and the City. "I decided to write a plus-sized version of the show," says Weber, 41, who recently appeared at a book signing at the Catonsville Wal-Mart. His primary readership of black women enjoys his humorous drama-filled spins on everyday life. Released in January, Something on the Side reached The New York Times best-sellers list. Weber also has had other works appear on that list, including The First Lady and So You Call Yourself a Man. Weber's latest book revolves around the adventurous lives of six women from the Big Girls Book Club, a group for plus-sized women, who are at least a size 14. Weber says this is a demographic that gravitates to his books.
NEWS
By TOM DUNKEL and TOM DUNKEL,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2007
I originally thought I was going to write this encyclopedic book of lynching," says Sherrilyn Ifill, a professor at the University of Maryland School of Law in Baltimore. Instead, her research took a narrative turn as she focused on the tragic deaths of Matthew Williams and George Armwood, two black men murdered by white mobs on the Eastern Shore in the 1930s - the last two recorded lynchings in Maryland. Ifill wound up devoting five years to writing On the Courthouse Lawn ($25.95, Beacon Press)
NEWS
By CRAIG A. THOMPSON and CRAIG A. THOMPSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 6, 2006
THE WORLD AS I KNEW IT CHANGED IN JULY 2003 when my wife and I learned that she was pregnant. We had prayed and wished and hoped (and tried) for a baby, and now those prayers were answered. Indeed, there was the joy, excitement and sheer exhilaration at the idea of bringing a new life into the world. At the same time, we were somewhat overwhelmed by the thought of reorganizing our schedules, reprioritizing our lives and navigating the fields of work and home. As lawyers, we were used to the demands of client service and late-night motions drafting, but less familiar with the demands of diaper changing and late-night feeding and burping.
NEWS
January 1, 2006
Rona Jaffe, 74, whose 1958 novel The Best of Everything told the melodramatic story of four young career girls torn between storybook romance and cutthroat corporate Manhattan, died of cancer Friday at University College Hospital in London, where she was on vacation. Movie producer Jerry Wald essentially commissioned Miss Jaffe, at the time a 25-year-old former associate editor in publishing, to write a book that he could turn into a blockbuster feature film. Less than a year after the book appeared, The Best of Everything was released as a chic but heavy-handed film by 20th Century Fox. Hope Lange, Diane Baker, Martha Hyer and the 1950s model Suzy Parker starred as the young women about town.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mimi Avins and Mimi Avins,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 10, 2005
LOS ANGELES - There are two groups who seem to indulge in writing memoirs: people who are too young to have lived through very much, and those who have lived so long that they've forgotten much that happened. Jamie Reidy would seem to be from the first pack. He's only 35, and his story, Hard Sell, chronicles his professional adventures for exactly five years, from age 25 to 30. But in his last two years working as a salesman for Pfizer, the world's largest pharmaceutical company, he was among 119 reps in the urology division charged with marketing a new wonder pill called Viagra.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | October 17, 2004
PORTLAND, Maine - Take the fibs out of fishing and there's nothing left. But write it all down, and you may have a best-seller. After telling readers about her life at sea as skipper, as a swordfishing captain and about living on a speck of granite surrounded by a sea of lobster traps, Linda Greenlaw has decided that what we really need to know about her nautical life is that All Fishermen Are Liars. Which means, of course, that Linda Greenlaw is a liar, a fact gleefully played up by the publisher of her three books and spread around by her friends here at the Dry Dock Restaurant and Tavern on the city's waterfront.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | March 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Barbara A. Mikulski has been a socia worker, civic gadfly, Baltimore City councilwoman, member of the House of Representatives and, for the past six years, a U.S. senator. Now she wants to be an author. And she may even get published.The Maryland Democrat is the co-author of a novel about the fictional Sen. Norie Gorzack, wife of a Vietnam MIA who, after appointment to the Senate, helps solve some murders.The book, titled "Roll Call for Heroes," is in the hands of Beverly Hills agent Norman Brokaw -- a fact first reported by Newsweek.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 19, 2008
I have a new career plan, and it involves finding something I can do every day for a year and then finding somebody who will pay me to write a book about what happens when I do. This appears to be a lucrative publishing niche. We can now read about guys who spend a year reading the Oxford English Dictionary, the Bible and the Encyclopaedia Britannica. We can read about a woman who spent a year cooking Julia Child's recipes in a tiny New York apartment and a woman who spent a year traveling to three continents to find herself and a woman who spent a year taking all the advice offered in fashion magazines.
NEWS
By Amanda Ponko and Amanda Ponko,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2004
Kathy Lating-Wise of Havre de Grace and Elizabeth "Libby" Lawson-Lilley of Cub Hill recently released their first book, Letters of Advice for Child Care Providers - a compilation of early elementary child-care questions and advice. The book is a series of queries sent from day-care provider Lating-Wise to pediatric nurse practitioner Lawson-Lilley, who answers questions in a "Dear Abby"-type manner. Chapters such as health, development, socialization and eating habits categorize 100 child-care problem scenarios, conveyed with humor by Lating-Wise.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2004
When her blind, facially disfigured son Jermaine was a newborn 20 years ago, Jacqui Kess-Gardner prayed he would die in his sleep. Instead, the boy from Ednor Gardens, a neighborhood near the old Memorial Stadium, developed into a musical wonder, amazing fellow students and teachers at the Baltimore School for the Arts with his prowess and perfect pitch as a classical pianist. Now, at 20, Gardner is a student at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music in Ohio, training to become a professional musician and recording artist.
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