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NEWS
November 1, 1994
For Carroll County voters who may have been considering writing in Thomas Hickman's name for state's attorney next week, two recent developments offer ample reason for them to reconsider:Maryland's Court of Appeals, the state's highest court, upheld the acquittal of James Howard Van Metre III, and Mr. Hickman admitted he turned down a plea bargain that would have put this confessed murderer behind bars for 10 years.The Court of Appeals' refusal to even hear the Van Metre appeal confirms our earlier judgment that Mr. Hickman made a series of legal blunders that fairly call into question his competency as a prosecutor.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The brain injury Navy slotback Will McKamey suffered Saturday in Annapolis came during a noncontact practice drill, his parents wrote in an email distributed by an athletic department spokesman at the academy Monday. McKamey, a 5-foot-9, 170-pound freshman from Knoxville, Tenn., was airlifted from the practice field to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he underwent surgery and, as of Monday, remained in critical condition in a coma. The first padded drills of spring practice typically do not include any contact, and McKamey "did not sustain a bad hit or unusual or extreme contact in practice," his parents wrote.
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NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Special to The Sun | November 20, 1994
When Harford County newspaper publisher Maureen Jones plans a staff meeting, she asks all her writers, editors, artists and ad designers to finish their homework before they arrive."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Responding to growing public support for medical use of marijuana, the House of Delegates approved legislation Monday that would allow specially licensed physicians in Maryland to recommend the drug to patients with debilitating medical conditions. The bill now goes to the Senate, where supporters are optimistic about its prospects. The legislation would replace a system put in place last year that is widely regarded as a failure. That system restricted medical marijuana use to patients seeking care at academic medical centers, but none of the centers agreed to participate.
NEWS
July 8, 1993
We could not help noticing a recent report that "Hal," the super-intelligent but malevolent computer in Stanley Kubrick's '60s-vintage sci-fi film "2001," may become a best-selling author in the 1990s. Actually, the modern-day "Hal" is a souped-up Macintosh personal computer whose hacker owner, 43-year-old Scott French, has programmed it to churn out steamy novels based on the example of the late author Jacqueline Susann's trash-to-the-max "Valley of the Dolls."It took Mr. French nearly eight years to write the intricate computer instructions that allowed his Mac to spew out such lines as "Her heart leapt into her throat and she jumped involuntarily as the stranger appeared in front of her."
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,CHRONICLE FEATURES | October 22, 1995
Like it or not, we are writing more than ever at work these days. Faxes often require written responses. Computers, which many people thought would lead to the paperless office, have just made it easier to churn out reams and reams of memos. Even e-mail, a chat in cyberspace, depends on the written word.Much of what comes across our desks (and computer screens) is aimless, wordy and boring. To help you look better in writing, follow these 10 commandments:1. Be brief. Whether you're sending an official memo or --ing off a quick e-mail message, start with a clear statement of why you're writing.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | August 13, 2000
I am not jealous of the woman who writes the Harry Potter books. It does not bother me that her most recent book, "Harry Potter and the Enormous Royalty Check," has already become the best-selling book in world history, beating out her previous book, "Harry Potter Purchases Microsoft." It does not make me bitter to know that this woman's books are selling like crazy, while my own books -- some of which took me hours to write -- have become permanent nesting grounds for generations of bookstore-dwelling spiders.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | August 17, 2008
I was a sportswriter when my bosses asked me if I wanted to be a family-life columnist. That was years ago. I had a pretty good idea of what a family-life columnist was, and I'd certainly never aspired to be one. They wanted me to write about my life as a wife and the working mother of school-age children. That was not anything any journalist who came of age in the Watergate era wanted to write about. "But I don't have a life," I objected. "My career is in the Dumpster. My home life is chaos.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 23, 1993
It was the year Charles Manson went to prison, the voting age was lowered to 18, the New York Times published the Pentagon Papers, and I wrote my first full-time newspaper column.Today, I write my 3,000th.People often ask me the secret to lasting so long in the column-writing business.Sincerity, I tell them. Once you can fake that, you've got it made.Which is typical of people who work for newspapers. We use sarcasm to avoid revealing genuine emotion.We don't like to admit the truth: That this is an incredibly romantic profession.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The news that President Bush would be campaigning in California over the weekend raised some eyebrows among the politicians here. This is, after all, a state in which Mr. Bush is running so far behind Democratic nominee Bill Clinton that the operative question seems to be whether the president is "writing off California."In fact, Mr. Bush's campaign has committed itself to no fewer than six incursions into the state in the final eight weeks of the campaign. That is a schedule that could be reduced radically if it becomes apparent by, say, Oct. 1 that he is a sure loser here.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 15, 2014
Every year we are subjected to lists. Forbe's magazine lists the world's wealthiest individuals. Time magazine lists the most "influential" people, though real influence is difficult to define or quantify. What I've never seen is a list of satisfied people, much less stories about how they attained satisfaction. Arianna Huffington is trying to fill that gap. One of the world's biggest Type A personalities, Huffington, who launched The Huffington Post in 2005 and whose picture appears alongside celebrities, politicians and business icons, is now asking a question popularized in an old song by the late Peggy Lee: "Is that all there is?"
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2014
Union officials warned Thursday that as many as 200 maintenance workers and building monitors at Baltimore's public housing properties could lose their jobs under a plan intended to infuse the buildings with private money. Employees such as maintenance mechanic Lucky Crosby Sr., who has worked for the Housing Authority of Baltimore City for a decade, say they took the jobs with the understanding that the pay was relatively low, but the work was secure. "By working for the Housing Authority, we joined the credit union so we could buy homes that we have to finance," said Crosby, 46, of Sandtown-Winchester.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
You could make a plausible argument that '80s pop star Thomas Dolby has been blinded with science. Since he was a teen, Dolby, now 55, has looked for ways to blend technology with sound - whether that meant writing a quirky synthpop anthem that rose to No. 5 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart in 1982 ("She Blinded Me With Science") or inventing a cousin of the polyphonic ringtone likely playing on your cellphone today. Next week, Dolby will be named the Johns Hopkins University's first Homewood Professor of the Arts - a position that will enable him to help create a new center that will serve as an incubator for technology in the arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Baltimore-made "Veep" and "House of Cards" won Writers Guild of America honors over the weekend. HBO's "Veep" won for best comedy writing over "Modern Family," "30 Rock," "Orange Is the New Black" and "Parks and Recreation. " Those named in the award for "Veep" are: Simon Blackwell, Roger Drew, Sean Gray, Armando Iannucci, Ian Martin, Georgia Pritchett, David Quantick, Tony Roche and Will Smith. "House of Cards," from Netflix, won for best writing in a new series. It beat out "The Americans," "Masters of Sex," "Orange Is the New Black" and "Ray Donovan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Adam Rodgers and his grandfather thought they were taking the train to Philadelphia to check out colleges. But the cinema gods had other things in mind. "We're coming up the escalator," the Baltimore-born director recalled, "and I see this dolly track, I see this big Panavision camera. They were making a movie - Harrison Ford was there. They were making a movie called 'Witness.' I begged my grandfather to let me just stay in Penn Station to watch a little bit. Of course, a little bit became an hour, and an hour became three hours.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | January 17, 2014
Patterson High School students had little recourse last week when they were exposed to frigid temperatures in their unheated classrooms -- so they began a letter-writing campaign. The students, mostly juniors and seniors, wrote letters expressing their disappointment that school officials did not respond to pleas from teachers and students about the school's conditions, including busted pipes, which persisted through some HSA testing. A class of more than 30 students wrote letters to interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards about the conditions.
NEWS
By Phyllis Flowers and Phyllis Lucas | October 29, 1990
While many of us prepare to celebrate Halloween this week with thoughts of parties and trick-or-treating, a group of Brooklyn Park Elementary School students are sharing their feelings with our soldiers in Saudi Arabia.Evon Lindsey's third-grade class has sent letters to the American men and women stationed in the Persian Gulf. Some of the students have relatives and friends there.Lindsey got the idea of writing the letters after the students read "Dear Aunt Helen," a story that showed the importance and significance of writing letters to those far from home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
When it comes to music, singer/songwriter Mat Kearney was a late bloomer. In high school, Kearney wrote intensely personal essays, poems and spoken word pieces. Literature was Kearney's obsession - until he started borrowing his roommate's guitar and slipping out to the front porch to write music. "Songwriting all of the sudden was this glove that totally fit," he said. "I had a limited musical ability, but my ability to dive in and pour my heart out - no one could stop me from that." Most budding musicians learn to play cover songs first, and then attempt to write their own stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
As happy as I am not to have watch CBS Sports butcher any more Ravens telecasts, I do have to admit I'm feeling sad that this weekly conversation with viewers is ending today. I loved reading most of the things viewers wrote about Ravens telecasts this season -- as much of a letdown as the team itself was on the field. So, let's go straight to the conversation about the CBS telecast of the Ravens 34-17 loss to Cincinnati and my take on how the broadcast team did. Jim Nantz and Phil Simms were in the booth for CBS. Here's Glenn with an email: Been  reading your column for years and truly enjoy it. Nice to see someone who doesn't seem afraid to tell it like it is. At least you and your colleagues at the paper call out the coaches and players  when it's needed and don't sugarcoat it as some of your radio and t.v. peers do. Thanks, and I look forward to your column.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Every so often Greg Rosenthal comes across a word like "diapause. " And that's when things get interesting. A 10-year veteran of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rosenthal is frequently responsible for translating the wonky, academic language used by scientists and policy experts into words and concepts the public can understand. His work is paying off for the USDA. The Center for Plain Language, a Virginia-based group that promotes clear communication in government and business, last week ranked the department's written word among the best in the federal government.
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