Advertisement
HomeCollectionsWrit
IN THE NEWS

Writ

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 14, 2013
Cassidy Turley, a leading commercial real estate services provider in the U.S., announced the sale of the Plumtree Professional Center at 104 Plumtree Road in Bel Air. This 33,921-square-foot, single-story medical office building is fully leased to five tenants and is within close proximity to the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. Jonathan M. Carpenter and James S. Wellschlager of Cassidy Turley's Capital Markets Group represented the seller, Washington Real Estate Investment Trust.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 14, 2013
Cassidy Turley, a leading commercial real estate services provider in the U.S., announced the sale of the Plumtree Professional Center at 104 Plumtree Road in Bel Air. This 33,921-square-foot, single-story medical office building is fully leased to five tenants and is within close proximity to the Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. Jonathan M. Carpenter and James S. Wellschlager of Cassidy Turley's Capital Markets Group represented the seller, Washington Real Estate Investment Trust.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | February 28, 1992
Any conversation about successful real estate investing, especially during tough times, has to include mention of the Washington Real Estate Investment Trust of Bethesda, which has the top record in the industry for growth of share price and dividends -- up about 33 times in the past 15 years. WRIT has boosted its earnings 26 years in a row at a compound growth rate of 15 percent a year.This week, the trust reported record results for 1991: earnings up 14 percent and cash flow ahead 13 percent.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz swiftly denied a defense attorney's request for federal intervention in a state proceeding, dismissing the case a day after it was filed. Attorney Gary Proctor had filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus Tuesday, contending that his 19-year-old indigent client was unconstitutionally jailed before trial without evidence to support the gun, assault and attempted murder charges against him. A Baltimore Circuit Court judge threw out a photo identification of defendant Christopher Robinson last month because the picture had been significantly altered by police.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 5, 1992
Bill thinks the country is Arkansas writ large. George knows it is Texas writ small.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | October 4, 1991
No one need tell you that commercial real estate, generally, has been a poor investment during the last several years. Overvalued real estate has brought down a number of large American banks and other companies as well.At the same time, a few real estate firms have done well, probably none better than Washington Real Estate Investment Trust, which is headquartered in Bethesda. The company, known as Writ, has prospered throughout the real estate recession, or, as some would say, depression.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | May 8, 1992
Financial stocks might scare a lot of investors who immediately think about banks and their loan troubles. But the group also includes mutual funds, brokerage firms and insurance companies, and many of them have been good performers.Recently, for example, directors of GEICO Corp. of Chevy Chase voted a 5-for-1 stock split after another strong year that elevated the share price to a record high of above 230.USF&G Corp. reported a quarterly profit before allowing for preferred stock dividends, this coming after a very poor year in which the big insurance holding company lost $590 million.
NEWS
By JOHN J. CONNOLLY | November 22, 2005
My law firm represents an orthopedic surgeon who has been incarcerated for four years. Our client has never been charged with a crime. He has never had a trial. He is not permitted access to a telephone, Internet, or e-mail. He is permitted no visitors. He is shackled, transported and interrogated according to shifting policies of government agencies too numerous to mention. He has only one meaningful right: habeas corpus. The Senate voted to curtail that right in a last-minute amendment to a defense appropriations bill.
NEWS
September 27, 2006
Don't compromise fundamental rights We cannot allow the Senate and the Bush administration to rewrite the law in a way that will deny any individual the protection guaranteed by the writ of habeas corpus ("America's detainees face grave injustice," Opinion * Commentary, Sept. 22). The writ of habeas corpus has existed at least since the signing of the Magna Carta. Most Americans have lived with all of the rights, privileges and blessings of the Declaration of Independence and our constitutional law since the beginning of our history.
BUSINESS
By Donald Saltz | May 15, 1992
Last week, this column noted that a financial adviser offered the opinion that shares of Bethesda-based Washington Real Estate Investment Trust (Writ) were overpriced and should be sold, a remark that triggered some selling in the stock and lowered the price from above $25 a share to $22.Not long afterward, Writ released a solid first-quarter earnings report showing a 19 percent increase in profits and a gain of 16 percent in cash flow, along with strong overall occupancy of 94 percent as well as the near-elimination of all mortgage debt.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | January 15, 2010
U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz swiftly denied a defense attorney's request for federal intervention in a state proceeding, dismissing the case a day after it was filed. Attorney Gary Proctor had filed a petition for a writ of habeas corpus Tuesday, contending that his 19-year-old indigent client was unconstitutionally jailed before trial without evidence to support the gun, assault and attempted murder charges against him. A Baltimore Circuit Court judge threw out a photo identification of defendant Christopher Robinson last month because the picture had been significantly altered by police.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | November 2, 2008
The cabbage patches along Route 20 just outside of Seneca, N.Y., are as big as some of the dairy farms in Harford County. Farmers in Lancaster County, Pa., alone produce more than twice the amount of milk of all the dairy farms in Maryland. While maple syrup production has slowed to a trickle in Garrett County, it is still big business in rural sections of New York and Pennsylvania. These are just a few tidbits of agriculture knowledge I picked up during recent tours of farming operations in New York and Pennsylvania.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 4, 2008
Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson is some paradoxical kind of great documentary. Writer-director and co-producer Alex Gibney uses any means at hand to make the rare movie about a journalist that actually takes us into a writer's head. He includes never-before-heard audiotapes of Thompson at work and play (often there was no difference), snippets of Johnny Depp playing Thompson in Terry Gilliam's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (1998), and even Depp himself, reading from Thompson's work.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 19, 2008
In his Symphony No. 3, Beethoven is full of fire and grand gestures, more than enough to justify the work's title, Eroica - "Heroic." In his Piano Concerto, John Corigliano generates plenty of fire and grand gestures, too, as if he were also going for something heroic in scope. Maybe it's significant that Beethoven was only 33 in 1803 when he wrote that symphony, Corigliano only 30 in 1968 when he wrote that concerto - that's a good time in a person's life for thinking big. If you go The BSO performs at 11 a.m. today at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St. Tickets are $15-$57.
NEWS
September 27, 2006
Don't compromise fundamental rights We cannot allow the Senate and the Bush administration to rewrite the law in a way that will deny any individual the protection guaranteed by the writ of habeas corpus ("America's detainees face grave injustice," Opinion * Commentary, Sept. 22). The writ of habeas corpus has existed at least since the signing of the Magna Carta. Most Americans have lived with all of the rights, privileges and blessings of the Declaration of Independence and our constitutional law since the beginning of our history.
NEWS
By JOHN J. CONNOLLY | November 22, 2005
My law firm represents an orthopedic surgeon who has been incarcerated for four years. Our client has never been charged with a crime. He has never had a trial. He is not permitted access to a telephone, Internet, or e-mail. He is permitted no visitors. He is shackled, transported and interrogated according to shifting policies of government agencies too numerous to mention. He has only one meaningful right: habeas corpus. The Senate voted to curtail that right in a last-minute amendment to a defense appropriations bill.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
What Citizen Kane was to movie lovers in 1941, The Wild Bunch was to cineastes in 1969. Its adrenaline rush of revelations seemed to explode the parameters of the screen. The director and the co-writer, Sam Peckinpah, turned the last stand of the Hole-in the-Wall Gang into a wrenching piece of early 20th-century mythology. His filmmaking both evinced and catalyzed complex feelings about the outlaws' freedom, brotherhood and professionalism, their manliness and childishness, and the way they experienced the closing of the West as Purgatory and used Latin America as an escape hatch.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and By Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Staff | June 10, 2001
"The Flag, The Poet & The Song: The Story of the Star-Spangled Banner," by Irvin Molotsky. Dutton. 240 pages. $22.95. The story surrounding the writing of "The Star-Spangled Banner" is certainly a familiar one to Marylanders, since it happened in their own backyard. Or is it? Irvin Molotsky, a New York Times reporter, has unmasked and exposed much of the historical nonsense that has surrounded the creation of the national anthem since its writing in 1814. And in doing so, he has written a thoroughly fascinating and meticulously researched account which examines the personalities and historical background behind "The Star-Spangled Banner."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 10, 2005
Halfway through Passion Play, a cycle, a character remarks: "In Oberammergau, everything is as it appears to be." Oberammergau, Germany, is the site of the most famous continuing staging of the medieval, religious Passion play. That town, in 1934, is the setting for the second part of Sarah Ruhl's ambitious trilogy about war, religion, politics and prejudice. And, everything is definitely not "as it appears to be" - in Oberammergau (where the supposedly pious Passion play performers turn out to be Nazis)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
What Citizen Kane was to movie lovers in 1941, The Wild Bunch was to cineastes in 1969. Its adrenaline rush of revelations seemed to explode the parameters of the screen. The director and the co-writer, Sam Peckinpah, turned the last stand of the Hole-in the-Wall Gang into a wrenching piece of early 20th-century mythology. His filmmaking both evinced and catalyzed complex feelings about the outlaws' freedom, brotherhood and professionalism, their manliness and childishness, and the way they experienced the closing of the West as Purgatory and used Latin America as an escape hatch.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.