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By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | October 4, 2009
Brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright, anxious to sell an "aeroplane" of their own manufacture, entered into discussions with the Army in 1907. Signal Corps' requirements were rather stringent. The plane was to be spacious enough for two people, maintain a speed of 40 mph with a range of 125 miles, and be capable of remaining aloft for an hour. It was also not to be so technically complicated that training pilots would require an enormous amount of time. Successfully beating out two other bidders, the Wrights received the contract to build the airplane.
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EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
The Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum has been taking the Glenn L. Martin Company rocket age history on the road to Harford County. Thanks to support from the Dresher Foundation, the museum is offering its outreach STEM education program "From Sand Dunes to the Moon" to third grade classes at Harford County elementary schools. This interactive activity celebrating flight and Maryland's contribution to the pioneering days of manned space exploration is designed to launch excitement for aerospace possibilities as it inspires students to explore the future of aviation while they discover and learn to appreciate the technological wonders of the past.
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NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 15, 2002
First in an occasional seriesWARRENTON, Va. - On a grass runway last fall, amid the low rolling hills of the countryside, Terry Queijo prepared for takeoff. Her 32-foot aircraft, a reproduction of a 1902 Wright brothers glider, resembled an overgrown box kite made of wood and bed sheets. It hardly looked flight-worthy. Resting belly to earth in the glider's cradle, the Eastern Shore resident concentrated intently as a pickup truck ahead cruised down the runway at 25 mph - glider in tow. Within moments, Queijo ascended, hovering 20 feet above the earth.
FEATURES
By Raymond M. Lane, For The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
"I flew a mother and two young daughters, probably 4 and 7 years old, and as we took off I heard this shrieking from the back of the plane," said Lin Caywood, a 12-year pilot. A mother and recent grandmother herself, Caywood thought the kids were upset about the flight, and banked to circle back to Frederick Municipal Airport for a quick landing to calm the hysterical children. "Then I caught a look at them, and they weren't upset," said Caywood, a Baltimore native and graduate of Poolesville High and Hood College.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 18, 2003
DAYTON - All that remains of the bicycle shop where brothers Orville and Wilbur Wright invented the world's first successful airplane is a vacant grassy lot at 1127 W. Third St. - until last year, the site of Andy's Furniture store. The Wright brothers' two-story brick shop, as well as the clapboard house at 7 Hawthorn St. where they grew up, was sold to Henry Ford in 1936 and moved 182 miles north to the automobile manufacturer's living history center, Greenfield Village, in Dearborn, Mich.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2003
One in a series of occasional articles They may have appeared stiff and square in their starched white collars and bowler hats, but this week, the 100th anniversary of their first flight at Kitty Hawk, N.C., the Wright brothers will be the toast of the party. The brainy brothers have graced magazine covers, appeared in a General Electric television ad, been the subject of documentaries, and had their ingenuity paid homage to in newspaper headlines across the country in recent weeks. "Takeoff!
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
The discoveries of the Wright brothers didn't just (pardon the pun) drop out of the sky. Anyone who doubts that progress happens one step at a time need look no further than The Birth of Aviation, an exhibit at the Maryland Science Center that puts you in the Wrights' cockpits as they carried out their high-risk mission to learn the scientific laws of flight and put them to use. Along one wall, five wooden contraptions look part catapult and part chiropractor's...
FEATURES
December 17, 1992
THIS DATE IN HISTORY:DEC. 17In 1777, France recognized American independence.In 1892 -- the dress rehearsal for "The Nutcracker Suite" by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky was staged in St. Petersburg, Russia, in the presence of Czar Alexander III, who, the composer later recalled, was "full of compliments." (However, the ballet was poorly received by the press and public when it premiered the following night.)In 1903, the Wright Brothers -- Orville and Wilbur -- staged the first successful powered-airplane flights near Kitty Hawk, N.C.In 1925, Col. William "Billy" Mitchell was convicted at his court-martial of insubordination.
FEATURES
By Aron Davidowitz and Aron Davidowitz,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2003
Eight-year-old Matthew Stone watched as his mother, Maureen, climbed aboard the odd-looking "flying" contraption, got locked in and attempted, using her hands and hips, to navigate it above a landscape of beach and brush and farmhouses. Maureen Stone, 43, from Wilmington, Del., did not do very well, but that didn't seem to upset her young son. "Cool!" cried Matthew. "She crashed!" Fortunately, only his mother's pride was hurt. Her brief flight was merely a virtual one, a partly person-powered but mostly digital try at re-enacting the Wright brothers' feat: the first sustained controlled flight of a heavier-than-air machine 100 years ago near Kitty Hawk, N.C. This weekend at the Maryland Science Center, people of all ages can try to best Maureen Stone - and Orville and Wilbur Wright - by testing their flying skills on the 1903 Wright Simulator Flyer, part of a traveling exhibition marking the Wright centennial in December.
EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
The Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum has been taking the Glenn L. Martin Company rocket age history on the road to Harford County. Thanks to support from the Dresher Foundation, the museum is offering its outreach STEM education program "From Sand Dunes to the Moon" to third grade classes at Harford County elementary schools. This interactive activity celebrating flight and Maryland's contribution to the pioneering days of manned space exploration is designed to launch excitement for aerospace possibilities as it inspires students to explore the future of aviation while they discover and learn to appreciate the technological wonders of the past.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Barry H. Landau has rubbed elbows with presidents, helped plan inaugurations, and claims one of the largest collections of Oval Office memorabilia outside museums and presidential libraries. His Manhattan apartment includes a collection of china from Thomas Jefferson's inauguration and a picture of Landau kissing John F. Kennedy's dog Clipper. Police say he tried to expand that collection by pilfering dozens of rare documents from the Maryland Historical Society on Saturday. Landau, whose connections reportedly bridge the Washington, New York and Hollywood elite, now sits in Central Booking and is being held without bail.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | October 4, 2009
Brothers Wilbur and Orville Wright, anxious to sell an "aeroplane" of their own manufacture, entered into discussions with the Army in 1907. Signal Corps' requirements were rather stringent. The plane was to be spacious enough for two people, maintain a speed of 40 mph with a range of 125 miles, and be capable of remaining aloft for an hour. It was also not to be so technically complicated that training pilots would require an enormous amount of time. Successfully beating out two other bidders, the Wrights received the contract to build the airplane.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | October 4, 2009
Lee Kenny has always fancied himself an artist. It took an energy drink to get his creative aspirations off the ground. Two years ago, Kenny, a house painter from Pasadena, had plenty of work, a great girlfriend and a gratifyingly busy life. But a strange idea possessed him. He wanted to build a flying machine and see if he could get it in the air. "I had the design finished," says Kenny, who hoped to enter his creation in a mock aviation contest. "It would be shaped like a jet and have removable wings.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
By now, you are probably savoring memories of a traditional Thanksgiving holiday spent dancing to disco hits, swimming in the frosty Atlantic and hang gliding off huge sand dunes. Huh? Well, my parents have spelled "vacations" a-d-v-e-n-t-u-r-e for as long as I can remember, so this range of strange is normal to me. A brief review of my vacation memories reveals my earliest one: my dad pulling off the road somewhere in upstate New York when he saw a hand-lettered sign that read "Piper Cub Ride's $40."
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | September 16, 2006
Nearly a century ago, some of the nation's first naval aviators flew over Annapolis in a plane built by the Wright brothers. Yesterday the 1911 Navy B-1 returned to the Naval Academy, this time as a full-size, exact replica. The open-air plane was hoisted up into one side of Dahlgren Hall, where it will eventually become part of an exhibit that celebrates how academy graduates and the school have played a role in aviation history. "This is a priceless piece of history that will be part of the rebirth of Dahlgren Hall," said Syd Rodenbarger, a 1970 graduate behind the effort.
NEWS
By JONATHAN PITTS and JONATHAN PITTS,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
The discoveries of the Wright brothers didn't just (pardon the pun) drop out of the sky. Anyone who doubts that progress happens one step at a time need look no further than The Birth of Aviation, an exhibit at the Maryland Science Center that puts you in the Wrights' cockpits as they carried out their high-risk mission to learn the scientific laws of flight and put them to use. Along one wall, five wooden contraptions look part catapult and part chiropractor's...
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | September 16, 2006
Nearly a century ago, some of the nation's first naval aviators flew over Annapolis in a plane built by the Wright brothers. Yesterday the 1911 Navy B-1 returned to the Naval Academy, this time as a full-size, exact replica. The open-air plane was hoisted up into one side of Dahlgren Hall, where it will eventually become part of an exhibit that celebrates how academy graduates and the school have played a role in aviation history. "This is a priceless piece of history that will be part of the rebirth of Dahlgren Hall," said Syd Rodenbarger, a 1970 graduate behind the effort.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2008
By now, you are probably savoring memories of a traditional Thanksgiving holiday spent dancing to disco hits, swimming in the frosty Atlantic and hang gliding off huge sand dunes. Huh? Well, my parents have spelled "vacations" a-d-v-e-n-t-u-r-e for as long as I can remember, so this range of strange is normal to me. A brief review of my vacation memories reveals my earliest one: my dad pulling off the road somewhere in upstate New York when he saw a hand-lettered sign that read "Piper Cub Ride's $40."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
MOSCOW - An experimental satellite designed to test spacecraft propulsion by solar power crashed into the ocean shortly after takeoff when the launch rocket shut down prematurely, Russian space officials said yesterday. But the Planetary Society, the Pasadena, Calif., organization that sponsored the flight, held out a slim hope that the craft, called Cosmos 1, made it into orbit, albeit one very different from the orbit that had been planned. A news release issued by the Russian space agency early yesterday said that the converted intercontinental ballistic missile that launched Cosmos 1 from a submarine in the Barents Sea suffered an engine failure in its first stage 83 seconds after ignition - well short of the estimated six minutes the ICBM's three stages were to fire.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
The bicycles ridden by the racers in the Tour de France bear as much resemblance to your childhood Schwinn as a Piper Cub does to an F-16: Only the basics are the same. But the high-tech, multithousand-dollar bikes zipping through the French countryside are based on a 125-year-old design that remains stubbornly resilient - a simple, profound piece of engineering that continues to have a hold on the human spirit. "It is one of those inventions that stirs passions," says Roger White, a specialist in transportation history at the Smithsonian Institution.
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