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Wrecking Ball

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NEWS
October 6, 2013
Let's set something straight. There is a law, the Affordable Care Act, that was passed by both houses of Congress, signed by the president and vetted by the Supreme Court. That's all three branches of government. What House Speaker John Boehner is attempting is unconstitutional ( "Obama blames Boehner for 'reckless' shutdown," Oct. 3). If he wants to change the law, the Republicans need to win the White House and the Congress, then pass a law that amends or abolishes the present law. That's the process spelled out in our Constitution.
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NEWS
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
The early-'90s ladies almost completely dominate the list, via Billboard's Hot 100 chart archive. Let's flash back 24 years, shall we? 10. "Black Velvet," Alannah Myles This former No. 1 - and future favorite of every single "American Idol" hopefui - was inspired by the life of Elvis Presley. Seriously. "In a flash he was gone/ It happened so soon," indeed. 9. "Forever," Kiss Apparently to make this list you had to go power ballad-y. Congrats, Kiss. P.S.: This one was co-written by Michael Bolton ... if you couldn't already tell.  8. "Get Up!
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BUSINESS
By Daniel H. Barkin and Daniel H. Barkin,SUN STAFF | November 12, 1995
For more than a decade, the home on Upland Road sat vacant, falling into ruin. The floors had rotted. Squirrels and raccoons were the only tenants.It was a blight on the upscale Roland Park neighborhood, a structure seemingly destined to a rendezvous with a wrecking ball.But the house, which dates to the early 1900s, has been saved by a builder and by a family yearning for a spacious, old city home."It really is a grand-looking house," said Sharon Francioli, who, with her husband and daughter, moved to Roland Park from Hunt Valley in August.
ENTERTAINMENT
Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
As Galang returns from Tribal Council, Laura B. thinks Rupert would be proud of her because she survived the first vote. Well, Laura, you survived because they're keeping you for an easy vote later; I wouldn't celebrate too soon. Gervase and Tyson are talking about what will happen after the merge. They aren't too sure about what Aras will do or how long they should trust him. They think they only have one more challenge before a possible merge, but based on the previews for tonight's episode, plus the fact that they've mentioned the merge within the first five minutes of the show, I think it might be happening sooner than that.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2000
To 90-year-old Mary Virginia Klohr, the former Randallstown community building is more than a handsome stone structure threatened by a wrecking ball. Klohr worked as a cashier in the basement bowling alley when she was a teen-ager. She watched plays upstairs in the auditorium and mailed letters at the post office. She even sold fried chicken and pies to raise money for construction of the center, on Liberty Road. Now living in a retirement home in Sykesville, Klohr was angry when she learned that the building - constructed in 1927 by Seymour K. Ruff, a prominent stonemason and developer - might be demolished.
NEWS
By Liz Boch and Liz Boch,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
As demolition workers used Bobcats to pile mounds of concrete, brick and metal into trucks, a 50-foot-wide hole in the walls of the old Anne Arundel Medical Center parking garage loomed behind them. Where hospital employees, patrons and the occasional downtown worker once parked their cars, a three-story hole left by a wrecking ball remains as demolition crews make way for the largest residential development the city could see in some say "another 50 years." Though crews began removing hazardous materials five months ago from the hospital site -- a combined area of about 400,000 square feet -- demolition of the parking garage began last week and will continue for the next three weeks, said Rob Schuetz, project manager and vice president of Madison Homes Inc. Schuetz said demolition of the entire medical center will be completed within five months, barring bad weather.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 9, 2004
No places in America's cities should be more celebrated than their movie palaces, those opulent showplaces of yore where people of every strata could gather four, five or six times daily to see their fantasies played out larger than life on the silver screen, where they could escape from whatever warranted escaping, sit in a dark room and surround themselves in alternate realities that changed on an almost-weekly basis. Unfortunately, in today's world of giant multiplexes and homogenized mass-market entertainment, those palaces have become dinosaurs.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STUFF | September 20, 2000
It was a late-night legal scramble worthy of a death-row inmate. An attorney sped to a judge's home at 10:30 p.m. to appeal for an emergency injunction. Protesters stood in vigil. Fliers cried for justice. But the subject of the marches, chants and placards reading "Outrage!" wasn't a person facing the electric chair. It was a pair of vacant, nearly 100-year-old office buildings in downtown Baltimore that a developer started demolishing Monday to build a 125-room Marriott Residence Inn hotel.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jay Apperson and Jamie Stiehm and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2000
Barring political intervention, Memorial Stadium will be torn down by June, with a Baltimore contractor using a conventional wrecking ball for the demolition and spending six months removing the rubble, Maryland Stadium Authority officials said yesterday. The contract with Potts & Callahan Inc. has to clear the state Board of Public Works, which is expected to vote on it Nov. 15. State Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, one of three board members and a critic of the plan to use the stadium site for elderly housing, said yesterday he would not vote to approve the contract.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1999
DOWNTOWN Baltimore's west side might have been named one of America's 11 most endangered places this week, but a portion of the city's financial district might disappear first if local officials don't stop the wrecking ball.Two vacant buildings on Redwood Street in danger of demolition are:The former Fairfax Savings and Loan Building, a four-story structure at 17 Light St. Designed by Charles E. Cassell, the building was one of the first constructed after the 1904 fire in downtown Baltimore.
NEWS
October 6, 2013
Let's set something straight. There is a law, the Affordable Care Act, that was passed by both houses of Congress, signed by the president and vetted by the Supreme Court. That's all three branches of government. What House Speaker John Boehner is attempting is unconstitutional ( "Obama blames Boehner for 'reckless' shutdown," Oct. 3). If he wants to change the law, the Republicans need to win the White House and the Congress, then pass a law that amends or abolishes the present law. That's the process spelled out in our Constitution.
NEWS
May 23, 2013
I read with great relief that Towson University Athletic Director Mike Waddell is leaving after a two and a half year tenure, and a very turbulent past half-year at the school ("Athletic director Waddell leaving for post at Arkansas," May 21). I am not appreciative of the kind of legacy Mr. Waddell leaves at my alma mater. My perspective is that he is a self-important opportunist who cloaked his intent and purpose at Towson by feigning to put the student-athletes' needs first, while padding his pockmarked resume.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
An old Victorian home, built of granite and dating to 1896, sits on the corner of two wide, tree-lined streets in Havre de Grace, welcoming visitors from near and far. Carol Nemeth, has been running her "Victorian Lady" as a full-time bed-and-breakfast since 1994, seven years after she and her then-husband, Jim, purchased it in 1987. The intention was never to turn it into a B&B, but rather to take a neglected property and bring it back to its original condition. The Nemeths had restored one home in town, but they wanted to try their hands at a larger place.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2011
The HowChow blog posted the alarming news that the days of Mango Grove, and its sister restaurant Mirchi Wok, may be numbered. The Howard Cuonty Department of Planning and Zoning has approved a developer's plans to
NEWS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 22, 2010
Baltimore's historic Lloyd Street Synagogue was almost torn down in the late 1950s to make way for a parking lot. An architect was hired to prepare scale drawings of the structure, so there would be a record of it after it was gone. Now the 1845 building is bustling with activity, after a $1 million restoration and the opening of a lower-level gallery designed to extend its reach as a center of education and tourism. The Jewish Museum of Maryland, which now owns the synagogue, opened the gallery Sunday as the latest addition to its Herbert Bearman campus.
NEWS
May 11, 2009
Look around Baltimore and you will see a compendium of architectural styles and historic structures. From the dome of the Basilica and the Washington Monument tower to the elegant main building of the Maryland Institute College of Art and the magnificent Marburg Pavilion at the Johns Hopkins University Hospital, Baltimore is home to hundreds of landmark buildings that document its nearly 300-year history. Yet despite this rich architectural legacy, many Baltimore landmarks have survived the passage of time almost by accident; it wasn't until the late 1960s that serious efforts to preserve historic city structures got underway.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
An East Baltimore family stranded in a crumbling slum house in the middle of a demolished block of abandoned properties was evacuated yesterday by the city housing department -- clearing the way for the destruction of a notorious heroin alley near an elementary school.Billy and Muriel Warsaw and their two mentally disabled sons had resided in the disintegrating 1100 block of N. Port St. for 20 years when a Department of Public Works crew appeared last summer and began knocking it down, only to discover the family living there.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2004
OCEAN CITY -- After a lifetime spent in Maryland's beach resort, former Mayor Roland E. "Fish" Powell is leaving town, lured like so many these days across the U.S. 50 bridge by developers who will soon demolish his modest St. Louis Avenue home for another condominium project. In a time of unprecedented redevelopment, the sand beneath his place and other older houses, restaurants and businesses is worth too much to stand pat. Even landmarks such as the silver English Diner at 22nd Street -- once an unofficial town hall, where Powell and other regulars still hold forth every morning -- are facing the wrecking ball or have already been demolished.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 4, 2008
Is the future of a new East Baltimore becoming evident on Washington Street just north of Johns Hopkins Hospital? On a long walk through this decimated and emptied neighborhood, it was easy to see where nearly 1,200 houses (on 100 acres) were knocked down. The empty space created by all that demolition provokes strong emotions. I thought of how the Inner Harbor looked in the mid-1970s or the Charles Center in the 1960s.
NEWS
By Brian Bouldrey and Brian Bouldrey,Chicago Tribune | March 18, 2007
Winterton Blue Trezza Azzopardi Grove / 273 pages / $24 In Winterton Blue, the new novel by Trezza Azzopardi, Lewis is the handsome but high-strung drifter tortured by the premature death, years before, of his twin brother, Wayne. Lewis cannot hold down a job, he cannot maintain much in the way of a normal human relationship, and he cannot bear to be in a room than has much more in it than a bed. "He rests his back against the railing and puts his kitbag on his lap to stop his knees from jumping.
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