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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
William C. Ensor Jr., a retired estate manager and decorated World War II veteran, died Feb. 13 of heart failure at Lorien Mays Chapel. He was 91. The son of farmers, William Clark Ensor Jr. was born in Monkton and later moved with his family to Ruxton, where his father farmed in what is now the Four Winds neighborhood. Mr. Ensor attended Towson High School and enlisted in the Army in 1943, where he served with the 78th Infantry "Lightning" Division in the European theater. Mr. Ensor took part in the Battle of the Bulge and in the capture, intact, of the strategically important Schwammenauel Dam that spanned the Roer River.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Alice S. Lumpkin, an environmentalist and animal lover who with her husband owned and managed their Worthington Valley farm, died Saturday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 52. The daughter of Dr. Samuel McComb Lumpkin, an ear, nose and throat specialist, and Barbara Seney Waters Lumpkin, a homemaker, Alice Seney Lumpkin was born in Baltimore and raised in Sparks and on Geist Road in Glyndon. After graduating in 1979 from Garrison Forest School, she earned a bachelor's degree in geology with an environmental option from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, in 1984.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 8, 2010
Carol Helme Brewster, a former Philadelphia socialite and renowned equestrian who during her marriage to former Maryland Sen. Daniel Baugh Brewster owned Worthington Farms, where the couple hosted the annual Maryland Hunt Cup and feted celebrities from the worlds of politics, film and business, died Thursday of complications from a stroke at the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 92. Carol Helme Leiper, the daughter of a wealthy and socially prominent lawyer and businessman, and a homemaker, was born in Philadelphia and raised in Chestnut Hill, Pa. Mrs. Brewster's father, James Gerhard "Gerry" Leiper Jr., was a talented equestrian, a master of foxhounds and co-founder of Andrew's Bridge Hunt in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2013
William C. Ensor Jr., a retired estate manager and decorated World War II veteran, died Feb. 13 of heart failure at Lorien Mays Chapel. He was 91. The son of farmers, William Clark Ensor Jr. was born in Monkton and later moved with his family to Ruxton, where his father farmed in what is now the Four Winds neighborhood. Mr. Ensor attended Towson High School and enlisted in the Army in 1943, where he served with the 78th Infantry "Lightning" Division in the European theater. Mr. Ensor took part in the Battle of the Bulge and in the capture, intact, of the strategically important Schwammenauel Dam that spanned the Roer River.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Alice S. Lumpkin, an environmentalist and animal lover who with her husband owned and managed their Worthington Valley farm, died Saturday of cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 52. The daughter of Dr. Samuel McComb Lumpkin, an ear, nose and throat specialist, and Barbara Seney Waters Lumpkin, a homemaker, Alice Seney Lumpkin was born in Baltimore and raised in Sparks and on Geist Road in Glyndon. After graduating in 1979 from Garrison Forest School, she earned a bachelor's degree in geology with an environmental option from Colby College in Waterville, Maine, in 1984.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord | April 27, 1995
Landslide Farm's Ivory Poacher, coming off a near record-setting victory at My Lady's Manor, is the clear favorite to win Saturday's 99th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup at Worthington Farms in Glyndon.Ann Fenwick trains the 10-year-old gelding, who is the only starter in the 10-horse field to have won the grueling 4-mile race over 22 timber fences.Only three other Hunt Cup veterans -- last year's runner-up Florida Law as well as Hello Hal and Reputed Dancer that were fifth and sixth, respectively, in 1994 -- are in the field.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | April 24, 1991
Sixteen horses, comprising one of the largest prospective fields in the history of the race, have been entered for Saturday's Maryland Hunt Cup in Glyndon.Included in the lineup are Cabral, winner of the My Lady's Manor and Grand National point-to-points in his last two starts, and Tom Bob, who has previously finished second in the 4-mile steeplechase.Four women jockeys, the most ever, have been named to ride. They are Blythe Miller (on Cabral), Sanna Neilson (Tom Bob), Anne Moran (The Wool Merchant)
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1994
LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- Imagine the MGM Grand Hotel and Gambling Casino in Las Vegas sitting next to the Twin Spires of Churchill Downs.That's where visitors to the 2000 Kentucky Derby might be staying if legislation passes Kentucky's General Assembly in 1996 permitting the state's racetracks to operate casinos.Churchill Downs is pushing for approval of such a project.In Maryland, such an idea is just a thought. The state racing commission recently established a subcommittee to study expansion into alternative forms of gaming at Maryland's racetracks.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1994
At about 10 a.m. yesterday, Louis "Paddy" Neilson III started to feel the hackles rise on the back of his neck."That's when I realized," Neilson said, "that the Hunt Cup is now just hours away."Neilson, 52, is set to make his 19th trip around the demanding, four-mile Maryland Hunt Cup course on Saturday, more times than any other living rider.The course has 22 fences, composed of rails nearly as thick as telephone poles. Five of the fences are 4 feet 10 high. Neilson says he feels the same way about them that he did when he first rode the course in 1958, when he was 16."
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2005
It all feels familiar. The land and course haven't changed. Granted, there are McMansions now, and a Rolls-Royce might drive by the old course. But the dandelions and weather-bent trees may have been here since the 1920s, when as many as 20,000 people came out to this valley to witness a rather eccentric sporting event. There aren't bookie boards anymore, but the red and white flags are again atop the timber fences on the 4-mile course, still bisected by Tufton Avenue and owned by a man with four initials who is nicknamed, simply, Duck.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 8, 2010
Carol Helme Brewster, a former Philadelphia socialite and renowned equestrian who during her marriage to former Maryland Sen. Daniel Baugh Brewster owned Worthington Farms, where the couple hosted the annual Maryland Hunt Cup and feted celebrities from the worlds of politics, film and business, died Thursday of complications from a stroke at the Brightwood retirement community in Lutherville. She was 92. Carol Helme Leiper, the daughter of a wealthy and socially prominent lawyer and businessman, and a homemaker, was born in Philadelphia and raised in Chestnut Hill, Pa. Mrs. Brewster's father, James Gerhard "Gerry" Leiper Jr., was a talented equestrian, a master of foxhounds and co-founder of Andrew's Bridge Hunt in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | April 25, 1992
Kathy Murray has been going to the annual Maryland Hunt Cup for longer than she wants to admit, and she'll be there today for what she calls "the picnic day of the year."Organizers of the prestigious horse race expect at least 4,000 spectators to crowd to Worthington Farms, off Tufton Avenue, to watch the running of the 96th annual Hunt Cup race, which begins at 4 p.m.Just a few years ago, before organizers began requiring parking passes to be purchased before race day, the Hunt Cup drew more fans.
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