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EXPLORE
July 25, 2011
A new study well worth reading by every elected official in Maryland is titled "Freedom in the 50 States. " You can find this study on the web at It ranks Maryland as 43rd out of the 50 states, meaning that Maryland is one of the least free states in the country. This study is very insightful and addresses both economic freedom (taxation) as well as unnecessary restrictions on personal liberties. A prime example of the type of bad legislation that deprives Maryland residents of their freedoms is the recently enacted HB 88, which makes the shipment of cigars and pipe tobacco into Maryland illegal.
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NEWS
May 2, 2012
Your recent article about corporate contributions to candidates is worth reading ("O'Malley weighs donor changes," April 30). However, the practice of big business being involved behind the scenes is not new. Companies with employees having expense accounts in the past have "suggested" they send personal checks for themselves and wife and carry the amount on their expense accounts showing entertainment (dinner) with clients or customers. If employees were limited by budget restrictions in the amount that could be submitted on the expense account, it was waived to accommodate the "contribution.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,Special to the Sun | May 9, 1999
Picture this: You drop by for a cup of coffee, pick up the book I've left on the coffee table and exclaim, "Haven't you read this before?" If you are near and dear to me, you may add, "At least a dozen times!"I, in turn, will glare at you before responding, "Your point being?"If you're my husband and you slip in some sly remark about my reading list of a dozen books, preferably bad, I will simply pretend not to have heard you. (You won't be surprised.)My position on the matter is simple: If a book is worth reading, it's worth reading again and again -- even if that means buying another copy after the original meets an untimely demise in the bathtub.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Stan Carey (You do read his posts, don't you? You should) has an excellent post on the whom quandary , and at Johnson R.L.G. has a follow-up worth reading. As usual, the comments on each article are instructive, though not necessarily in the way the commenters intend. I have trod this hard-packed ground myself at "For whom, the bell tolls" and return only to make some practical remarks. Historical patterns, usage authorities, questions of register and all else aside, these are things I see as a working editor and teacher.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | October 15, 1995
I was about to cancel my subscription to the Atlantic Monthly when the October issue came in. For years, I've looked to this venerable mag to provide a meaty mix of reportage, commentary and good fiction, but lately it's been drowning in dullness. Whither the articles of yesteryear, the quirky and wonderful pieces on the likes of mosquitoes and tornadoes? Now we get cover stories on reinventing government, abortion -- the Big Subjects of the day. Nothing wrong with that, certainly, but these articles' prodigious length has been enough to put the most die-hard reader to sleep.
NEWS
May 2, 2012
Your recent article about corporate contributions to candidates is worth reading ("O'Malley weighs donor changes," April 30). However, the practice of big business being involved behind the scenes is not new. Companies with employees having expense accounts in the past have "suggested" they send personal checks for themselves and wife and carry the amount on their expense accounts showing entertainment (dinner) with clients or customers. If employees were limited by budget restrictions in the amount that could be submitted on the expense account, it was waived to accommodate the "contribution.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | April 15, 1991
On Income Tax Day -- and be sure your return is postmarked by midnight tonight -- we present a mixture of items about the workplace, the area that generates much of the income we pay taxes on.GETTING STARTED: "First Job Survival Guide: Suggestions to Make Your Climb Easier" from Managing Your Career, Spring 1991, is worth reading. Excerpts: "Be a problem-solver; anyone can identify a problem but new hires who can point out solutions will garner their superiors' admiration . . . When beginning, choose a quality employer and don't leave except for the most compelling reasons . . . Keep money in perspective.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 23, 1992
Despite the recession, The Prime Rib restaurant (average dinner check $50-plus) was packed on Friday night for two sittings, with revelers also jammed three-deep around the piano and the bar. Eight blocks southwest, because of the recession, Our Daily Bread soup kitchen, 411 Cathedral St., was similarly packed Saturday and yesterday at noon, quietly feeding 650 hungry men, women and (sadly) little children. Because the soup kitchen, open 365 days a year, desperately needs money and staple food items, please phone director Steve Tuttle, 659-4000, for specific needs, delivery details, etc. (I take or send a $100.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Stan Carey (You do read his posts, don't you? You should) has an excellent post on the whom quandary , and at Johnson R.L.G. has a follow-up worth reading. As usual, the comments on each article are instructive, though not necessarily in the way the commenters intend. I have trod this hard-packed ground myself at "For whom, the bell tolls" and return only to make some practical remarks. Historical patterns, usage authorities, questions of register and all else aside, these are things I see as a working editor and teacher.
NEWS
By Sydney H. Schanberg | April 6, 1995
EVERY ONCE in a while, amid the brain-numbing, forest-destroying spew of paper that crosses a reporter's desk, there's a report worth reading. One of these landed on my desk last week.In a mere 23 pages, Oxfam America, the private, third-world development organization, has reminded us that Cambodia is still the sad, little, broken country that all the "great" powers turned it into in the 1970s.The Oxfam report is worth reading because it pulls at us to look squarely at something we all know but would rather not confront: our share of the responsibility for having made this demoralized country a monument to how powerful nations can swallow small ones and then spit them out when their usefulness is over.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
Sometimes the best thing a columnist can do is make way for the good sense of others. This is one of those times. In this case, that common sense is provided by an unlikely source — the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration. Now the MVA does a lot of things wrong. Who of us has not griped about waiting in line at one of its offices? (To be fair, on my last visit, I was in and out with a replacement driver's license in 10 minutes.) But the MVA has a new version of its Maryland Drivers Manual out on the street, and the section on bicycles is clear and well-stated.
EXPLORE
July 25, 2011
A new study well worth reading by every elected official in Maryland is titled "Freedom in the 50 States. " You can find this study on the web at It ranks Maryland as 43rd out of the 50 states, meaning that Maryland is one of the least free states in the country. This study is very insightful and addresses both economic freedom (taxation) as well as unnecessary restrictions on personal liberties. A prime example of the type of bad legislation that deprives Maryland residents of their freedoms is the recently enacted HB 88, which makes the shipment of cigars and pipe tobacco into Maryland illegal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | May 8, 2005
Time was, unsuspecting friends had only to momentarily admire the cute-kid pictures their new and not-so-new mother pals thrust into their hands. Then came the age of mother Web sites, and Mommy blogs. Now, instead of the pictures, moms are thrusting entire books -- stories of their lives as mothers -- into our arms to be cooed over just like newborns. We have entered the age of Our Babies, Ourselves. These books, in the forms of essays and memoirs -- "momoirs," they are called -- should satisfy plenty of readers, shouldn't they?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Teachout and Elizabeth Teachout,Special to the Sun | May 9, 1999
Picture this: You drop by for a cup of coffee, pick up the book I've left on the coffee table and exclaim, "Haven't you read this before?" If you are near and dear to me, you may add, "At least a dozen times!"I, in turn, will glare at you before responding, "Your point being?"If you're my husband and you slip in some sly remark about my reading list of a dozen books, preferably bad, I will simply pretend not to have heard you. (You won't be surprised.)My position on the matter is simple: If a book is worth reading, it's worth reading again and again -- even if that means buying another copy after the original meets an untimely demise in the bathtub.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 1998
"Singing in the Comeback Choir," by Bebe Moore Campbell. 374 pages. Putnam's Sons. $24.95.Black women buy books, and like to read about themselves. It took publishers forever to figure this out, but they finally got the message, and African-American readers are now among the most aggressively courted market segments in the book business.Hence the full-court press behind Bebe Moore Campbell's "Singing in the Comeback Choir," a Book-of-the-Month Club Main Selection whose author is being sent on a 20-city tour: Putnam, Campbell's publisher, obviously smells money.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 8, 1996
"MONEY MATTERS" to think about over the weekend:TAX-SAVER: "If you buy a 1-year Treasury bill or CD now, interest becomes 1997 income and not taxable until April 1998." (Straight Talk About Money)For information about new issues of Treasury bills, notes and bonds, call your broker or Baltimore Branch, Federal Reserve, (410) 576-3553.MANAGING MONEY: "Don't invest in your employer's stock through your 401(k) plan. You have enough at risk in the company's future through your job." (Moneypaper, February)
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 3, 1990
Want to keep your managers motivated? Business Week, Dec. 10, says, in part, "Offer lateral movement; make it clear that sideways moves aren't a dead end . . . Turn over more responsibility . . . Tie raises to performance, not seniority . . . Offer overseas assignments . . . Give more power . . . Provide mid-career breaks." (The issue, on newsstands this week, is worth reading.)BITS & PIECES:"A middle-income couple needs income between 60 and 80 percent of its pre-retirement income to live on at about the same level as it did while employed.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | November 26, 1990
With only five weeks left until year-end -- and so much to accomplish in your workplace between today and Dec. 31 -- do you wonder where you'll find the hours to do it all? Two current stories attack the problem:Working Woman, December issue, says, "Alec MacKenzie, author of Time for Success (McGraw Hill), surveyed the time logs of thousands of male and female executives to come up with a list of the biggest hour-eaters. Here they are, in order:"Crisis management, telephone interruptions, lack of objectives, unclear priorities, insufficient planning, attempting too much, drop-in visitors, ineffective delegation, personal disorganization, lack of self-discipline, inability to say no, procrastination.
FEATURES
By Cynthia Dockrell and Cynthia Dockrell,BOSTON GLOBE | October 15, 1995
I was about to cancel my subscription to the Atlantic Monthly when the October issue came in. For years, I've looked to this venerable mag to provide a meaty mix of reportage, commentary and good fiction, but lately it's been drowning in dullness. Whither the articles of yesteryear, the quirky and wonderful pieces on the likes of mosquitoes and tornadoes? Now we get cover stories on reinventing government, abortion -- the Big Subjects of the day. Nothing wrong with that, certainly, but these articles' prodigious length has been enough to put the most die-hard reader to sleep.
NEWS
By Sydney H. Schanberg | April 6, 1995
EVERY ONCE in a while, amid the brain-numbing, forest-destroying spew of paper that crosses a reporter's desk, there's a report worth reading. One of these landed on my desk last week.In a mere 23 pages, Oxfam America, the private, third-world development organization, has reminded us that Cambodia is still the sad, little, broken country that all the "great" powers turned it into in the 1970s.The Oxfam report is worth reading because it pulls at us to look squarely at something we all know but would rather not confront: our share of the responsibility for having made this demoralized country a monument to how powerful nations can swallow small ones and then spit them out when their usefulness is over.
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