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Worst Case Scenario

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | May 20, 2001
"The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook: Travel," by Joshua Piven and David Borgenicht (Chronicle Books, 191 pages, $14.95). Do not use brute force, heat, salt or insect repellant to remove a leech from your flesh -- there's a simple, safe, non-toxic method, using your fingernail. If you're lost in a jungle, follow animal trails downward to a river and raft out. If you find yourself on a runaway camel, don't try to stop it by pulling back; rather, use the reins to pull its head well to one side, forcing it to circle.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
A lawyer for the Orioles-controlled Mid-Atlantic Sports Network told a judge the network's cash reserves would be nearly eliminated and its operating margin dangerously thin if a June 30 decision by a league committee is allowed to stand, according to court documents. Documents — including affidavits, memorandums, transcripts and exhibits — describe from MASN's perspective a worst-case scenario in the television rights fee case pending before a New York judge. MASN has asked the judge to extend a temporary restraining order issued Aug. 7 blocking the panel's decision from being enforced.
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SPORTS
June 21, 2003
Who's hot Marlins starters have allowed only three walks over their past 45 1/3 innings. Who's not The Rangers have lost 17 of 19, their worst stretch since also going 2-17 from Aug. 5-25, 1973. Line of the day Shawn Estes, Cubs P IP R H BB SO 1 6 2 4 0 On deck Rodrigo Rosario today be comes the Astros' 11th starter, matching last year's total. He said it "I'm at the bottom of the barrel right now. The worst-case scenario is two weeks from now I don't have a job." Glendon Rusch, pitcher optioned to Triple-A Louisville by the Brewers after going 1-11 with an 8.61 ERA
NEWS
April 6, 2012
The Masters golf tournament, held annually at the Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, is on a collision course with reality. Here's the dilemma: The tradition-rich club is, and always has been, a men-only venue. One of their three main sponsors, IBM, has a female CEO, Virginia Rometty. This is the part where it gets a bit sticky. The four previous CEOs of IBM, all obviously males, held memberships at the club. To add a bit of fuel to the mix was Augusta National's Chairman Billy Payne's deflection of questions posed to him about the club's stodgy, antiquated rules of admission.
SPORTS
By Team previews by Ken Murray | September 4, 2003
AFC EAST Buffalo Bills Last season: 8-8, fourth place. Coach: Gregg Williams (11-21), third year with Bills. Pressing question: Will the improved defense make a big enough difference in an extremely tight division? Feeling the heat: RB Travis Henry had a Pro Bowl season, but he'll be looking over his shoulder at Willis McGahee, the Bills' surprise first-round pick. Key reinforcements: Although the rehabilitating McGahee (knee) isn't expected to be a factor until 2004, LB Takeo Spikes and DT Sam Adams are expected to upgrade the defense significantly.
NEWS
April 6, 2012
The Masters golf tournament, held annually at the Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, is on a collision course with reality. Here's the dilemma: The tradition-rich club is, and always has been, a men-only venue. One of their three main sponsors, IBM, has a female CEO, Virginia Rometty. This is the part where it gets a bit sticky. The four previous CEOs of IBM, all obviously males, held memberships at the club. To add a bit of fuel to the mix was Augusta National's Chairman Billy Payne's deflection of questions posed to him about the club's stodgy, antiquated rules of admission.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
However far-fetched, this is the fear: A rail car at a chemical plant in southern Baltimore ruptures without warning, releasing its full contents -- 180,000 pounds of chlorine -- into the atmosphere in a scant 10 minutes. The resulting toxic plume spreads for 14 miles, putting 1.6 million people at risk of property damage, injuries or worse.That worst-case scenario -- considered improbable if not impossible by experts -- was one of several disclosed yesterday morning during an awkward set of open houses at six of the state's largest chemical plants, all located near Curtis Bay.During the three-hour session, chemical executives shared with the public their worst nightmares about their plants -- and, in the next breath, insisted that residents have nothing to worry about.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | December 30, 2007
Worst-Case Scenarios By Cass R. Sunstein Harvard University Press / 340 pages / $24.95 Natural and man-made disasters, it seems, are everywhere. They come from terrorists and tsunamis. Waiting in the wings are anthrax, aerosols, asteroids, avian influenza, and Arctic ice floes. Each of them presents a "worst-case scenario:" a low-probability event that could do disastrous - and irreversible - damage to life as we know it. When risks have potentially catastrophic consequences - and reliable judgments cannot be made about probability - what steps should be taken to prevent them?
SPORTS
By PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | April 13, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- The next few months will be anxious ones for Temple forward Mark Karcher. After announcing yesterday that he is leaving school after his junior year to make himself eligible for the NBA draft, Karcher said he doesn't know exactly what his future will hold or in what round he might be drafted on June 28. "Right now, nobody knows. You don't know who is coming out," said Karcher, a St. Frances graduate who was the Owls' leading scorer for the past two seasons. "There's still a couple more weeks until the deadline for guys to put their names in for the draft.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 21, 1993
Look, I'm as happy as the next person that the warm weather is back, except it also signals the disturbing return of golfers.I watch them sling their bags over their shoulders and stumble out to their cars on Saturday mornings, an unearthly vision in their lime-green pants and tangerine polo shirts and white golf shoes.Eyes red from exhaustion, hands trembling from too many cups of 7-Eleven coffee, they stomp on the accelerator and fishtail madly down the highway in order to make that pre-dawn tee time.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 4, 2009
Seven astronauts are stranded in orbit after their shuttle is damaged during launch. Unable to repair the ship, they hunker down with dwindling supplies while four more astronauts board a second spacecraft and blast off on a daring rescue mission. NASA executives would like to keep this scenario in the realm of science fiction. But they're preparing for it just the same on the slim chance the shuttle Atlantis is crippled during the May 11 repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope. A second shuttle - Endeavour - is poised for liftoff from Cape Canaveral if there's a call for help from Atlantis.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | December 30, 2007
Worst-Case Scenarios By Cass R. Sunstein Harvard University Press / 340 pages / $24.95 Natural and man-made disasters, it seems, are everywhere. They come from terrorists and tsunamis. Waiting in the wings are anthrax, aerosols, asteroids, avian influenza, and Arctic ice floes. Each of them presents a "worst-case scenario:" a low-probability event that could do disastrous - and irreversible - damage to life as we know it. When risks have potentially catastrophic consequences - and reliable judgments cannot be made about probability - what steps should be taken to prevent them?
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2005
In backpacks across Washington County, schoolchildren bring home fliers for soccer teams and the springtime baseball leagues. Last week, kindergartner Emily Mutchler brought home a DNA-testing kit. Parents of the school system's 1,500 kindergarten pupils are being asked to keep a sample of their child's DNA in the freezer. If the child were to go missing, authorities could use the specimen to identify found remains. "We hope nobody actually has to use it because it's bad news if they do," said Brian K. Schulte, executive secretary of the Travelers Protective Association, a fraternal organization based in St. Louis that provided the kits.
NEWS
By Kathryn Hansen and Kathryn Hansen,SPECIAL TO BALTIMORESUN.COM | November 2, 2004
The year 1918 not only marked the last Boston Red Sox World Series victory, but also the worst flu pandemic in history. Eighty-six years had passed without much of a stir from either. But just as Boston's baseball team laid dormant all those years to surprise most this season with a comeback championship run, so too could another deadly flu pandemic. If the past is any indication, Baltimore is not immune to the destructive results of such an outbreak. When a new virus surfaces for the first time in humans, the population is left vulnerable to a pandemic.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2004
It was much ado about a simple case of the stomach flu. That was the diagnosis in the aftermath of Thursday night's incident at Baltimore-Washington International Airport that drew emergency vehicles -- and television news crews -- to the scene after reports of illness aboard a Southwest Airlines flight from Houston. The plane was even quarantined and boarded by a hazardous materials crew after landing about 10:30 p.m. It turned out that a sick woman had boarded the plane in Houston, vomited while on board and caused three other passengers to feel ill. She was treated at North Arundel Hospital and released early yesterday morning.
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