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December 23, 1993
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Upset victories can be the turning point in a team's season, and Salisbury may have found its defining moment of the 2014 campaign in Saturday's 37-34 overtime stunner against then-No. 6 St. John Fisher. But coach Sherman Wood wants to make sure that the Sea Gulls (2-2 overall and 1-1 in the Empire 8 Athletic Conference) don't let the win go to their heads. “What we have to be careful about here is overconfidence,” Wood said Wednesday morning. “We had a great win against Christopher Newport at their place at night in front of a packed house [in the season opener on Sept.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 2, 2001
Q. I am 38 years old and have had anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) almost my entire life. I've tried many psychiatric medications, but they cause too many side effects. I constantly worry, worry, worry about my health. I'm always arranging and rearranging my desk, clothes and closets, and I make lots of lists every day. Do you know of any natural products that can help these problems? A. Ask your doctor about Saint-John's-wort. A small preliminary study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry (August 2000)
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
An overwhelming majority of Marylanders are worried about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, a new poll finds, and most are concerned enough about the bay's slumping crabs to back a moratorium on crabbing. The survey by Goucher College found 84 percent of those contacted last week said they were very or somewhat concerned about bay pollution. Just 14 percent said it worried them little or not at all. The 708 Marylanders interviewed by telephone were only a little more upbeat about the overall health of the state's environment - 62 percent rated it fair to poor, while 36 percent consider it good to excellent.
FEATURES
By Linda Shrieves and Linda Shrieves,Orlando Sentinel | November 23, 1990
If you're a worrywart, these could be the busiest days of your life.Hundreds of thousands of soldiers are camped out in the Saudi Arabian desert, poised for war. The economy's flat. Gas prices are up; housing sales are down. Unemployment is rising; the stock market is in a slump.Poachers are killing elephants for their ivory. The Everglades may be dying. Even grocery shopping offers a choice to worry about: paper or plastic?"The level of anxiety in the nation is rapidly rising," said Alan Caruba, executive director of the National Anxiety Center, a New Jersey outfit that monitors the causes of worry.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 24, 1997
RICHMOND, Va. - With trepidation, Union Theological Seminary's 250 students are beginning to circulate their resumes among search committees.Seth Weeldreyer, 27, is concerned that a congregation might not be interested enough in theology and Scripture. "I hope I won't shut the mind off totally," he said.After 10 years on college campuses, he also worries about the inconveniences of starting in a small town. "I'm sure there are not stores like Wal-Mart," he said.Second-career seminarian Tom Waltz, a former corporate executive, wonders who wants to hire a 63-year-old.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | November 25, 1991
A scholar says Jews should worry about the vitality of their own faith before worrying about the next generation.Referring to future generations, Rabbi David Hartman, who gave the closing address yesterday to the 60th General Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations at the Baltimore Convention Center, said, "you can't control their future. You're not going to control the people they're going to meet. Instead of worrying about their continuity, worry about your joy in Judaism."Hartman is the founder of an institute in Jerusalem dedicated to drawing upon the heritage of Judaism in the confrontation between Jewish identity and modern society.
NEWS
By CAROL FREY and CAROL FREY,Carol Frey is regional affairs editor for The Sun | February 3, 1991
Alot of nice people look at you differently when your husband is in a war.They cock their heads to one side or the other, smile a half smile and furrow their brows with sad eyes as they ask you how you're getting along.I began noticing this on Jan. 15, the day of the United Nations deadline, which in our house began in the dining room strewn with newspapers."That's Saddam," my 4-year-old said, pointing to a photograph of the Iraqi with a mustache who would take his country to war rather than withdraw his soldiers from Kuwait.
NEWS
By Theresa Walker and Theresa Walker,Orange County Register | September 26, 1999
Gavin de Becker's latest book, "Protecting the Gift: Keeping Children and Teenagers Safe (and Parents Sane)" (Dial Press, $22.95), is intended to help those who are the most vulnerable in our society. De Becker, an expert on predicting and preventing violence, spoke recently about the book:Q. What worries parents?A. How can I know a baby-sitter won't turn out to be someone who will harm my child? What should I do if my child is lost in public? How can I spot sexual predators? What can I do to help my child be safer at school?
FEATURES
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2003
Sgt. 1st Class Brad Bonnell isn't worried about his two brothers in Iraq. His brother Bryon is a major and, because he's an aide to the commanding general of the 3rd Infantry Division, stays a safe distance from the action. His oldest brother, Brett, is also a major; he flies helicopters, but Brad doesn't think he has done so in this war theater. It's their mother Brad worries about most. "She's never been in a conflict with all three sons," he said one afternoon last week, while sitting on the back of a Humvee in Baghdad.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Morgan State football coach Lee Hull has been seeing a little bit too much yellow for his liking. The Bears (2-2, 1-0 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) nipped league rival Howard, 38-35, on Saturday, but not without drawing 10 penalties costing them 104 yards. It marked the third time this season that Morgan State incurred more penalties than its opponent. The team is averaging 8.5 penalties per game for an average loss of 77.5 yards. “I'm real concerned because that shows a lack of focus and a lack of discipline,” Hull said this week.
NEWS
September 20, 2014
It may be reasonable to be prepared in case Ebola presents in the U.S., but would our population not do better to listen to rational information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other authoritative sources? Flu presents a real, proven threat to health, life and productivity in the U.S. ( "The Ebola threat," Sept. 16) We would do well to have our flu shot before concerning ourselves with a less-easily-contracted illness which has no record of originating here.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
August 14, 2014
If Baltimore were actually considering privatizing its water system, the 50 or so people who were protesting outside City Hall on Wednesday would have had a strong case to be upset. But it's not. Rather, Baltimore is looking for a consultant to evaluate the operation and maintenance of its aging system to find ways to increase efficiency - something that should be greatly in the public interest at a time when rates are constantly going up and broken water mains are distressingly common.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2014
Right-hander Miguel Gonzalez took being optioned to Triple-A Norfolk this weekend in stride, saying that he knows someone had to be sent down with the Orioles' current roster crunch. “We're stacked,” Gonzalez said before Sunday's game. “We have a good ballclub, and you've got to take that and be like, 'Oh, well.' You can't do anything about it. Everyone's pitching well. There's got to be a guy who's got to go down.” Gonzalez was optioned before Saturday's win to make room on the 25-man roster for right-hander Ubaldo Jimenez, who was activated from the disabled list to start the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Day after day, someone somewhere discusses the state of classical music, typically with a degree of concern about its long-term survivability. This has been going on for ages, of course, but it has generated something of a cottage industry in recent years. Trepidation about the years ahead is especially prevalent and understandable right now, thanks to such things as the testy contract negotiations going on at the Metropolitan Opera and the recent labor/management battles at the Minnesota Orchestra.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreich and Samuel Goldreich,Staff writer | January 21, 1991
Come, my beloved, with chorus of praise,Welcome Bride Sabbath, the Queen of the day.-- from L'cha Dodi, a Jewish Sabbath prayer*They arrived with the setting sun, as Jews have for thousands of years, to celebrate the Sabbath.But for the few dozen congregants at Knesseth Israel in Annapolis Friday, news of Iraqi missiles landing in Tel Aviv tempered the joy and thanks traditionally offered for the day of rest.As always, men and women and children filed through separate doors into the sanctuary of the Orthodox synagogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,COX NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 1998
Sometimes I take after my namesake, my Great Uncle Bill, a man who had only a nodding acquaintance with reality and who delighted in worrying about improbable things.For instance, he worried himself sick about meteorites and avoided going outside during the peak of meteor showers. On the other hand, he spent most of his working life in the logging fields of the Pacific Northwest, during a place and a time when the term "widow maker" was coined for cutting a tree down in a careless fashion.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Big Brother is watching you — through your smart meter? One complaint about the technology, as electric and gas utilities roll it out here and across the country, is that it offers another way for government agencies — or hackers — to snoop on us. The American Civil Liberties Union notes that at least some utilities have turned over customer data after legal demands. San Diego Gas & Electric, required by California regulators to report annually on privacy issues, said it disclosed 3,056 customers' records last year, some of which could have included "energy usage data of varying granularities.
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